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Thursday, February 13


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#1 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:16 AM

Reviews of the Royal New Zealand Ballet.

 

The New York Times

I don’t know what these dancers looked like before Mr. Stiefel got his hands on them, but they’re spruce now, with pleasing manners and crisp classical technique. Where Mr. Millepied catches the music, they do, too. The women look particularly good: the springy Lucy Green, the sweet Tonia Looker. It’s telling that they do not pale in the presence of a world-class ballerina dancing flawlessly: the Ballet Theater principal, guest artist and fiancée of Mr. Stiefel, Gillian Murphy.

 

 

 

Broadway World

If the three ballets on the bill on Wednesday are any indication, he is wisely aiming for a wide range of styles and genres in the company's ever-expanding repertory. Not only that, but his dancers proved to be eminently capable of both classical and contemporary works. The first offering of the evening, "28 Variations on a Theme of Paganini", was choreographed by Benjamin Millepied in 2005 for students at the School of American Ballet. Five couples, the ladies in pointe shoes and pastel mid-length tutus and the gentlemen in complementing hues, all had star turns as well as ensemble work with a hint of Balanchine.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:23 AM

A review of Hamburg Ballet by Ann Murphy in The San Francisco Chronicle.

 

John Neumeier is one of those talented cooks who knows how to spoil his own soup. It's not that this Milwaukee-born director of the Hamburg Ballet lacks for ingredients. In his 1977 "A Midsummer's Night Dream," which opened in San Francisco Wednesday at War Memorial Opera House, he abounds in a near chaos of stuff, from fevered drama to burlesque to Balanchine-isms to 1970s-style sci-fi cum Busby Berkeley. But thanks to excess, he manages to take most of the elegance and poetry out of Shakespeare, which is rather like taking most of the broth out of the chowder.

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:26 AM

Wayne Sleep gets in trouble for using a new "F" word.

The group soon decide to advise Sleep on his future terminology, deciding the idea of "real women" is more appropriate.

 

Prima ballerina Monica Loughman adds: "He did put his foot in it, but he didn't mean any malice by it."

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:32 AM

The BBC discovers old footage of Margot Fonteyn in "The Sleeping Beauty."

 

That princess was Margot Fonteyn and the scene offers a rare glimpse of her beauty and presence. It is one of several delightful moments from recently rediscovered footage of a 1959 BBC broadcast of “The Sleeping Beauty,” found in a BBC archive, the network reported on Friday.

 

 

 

The Guardian. Video clip.

 

The ballet is being cut to an hour to be broadcast on BBC4 but the full 95-minute version will be watchable online. It will be shown as part of a wider ballet season on BBC2 and BBC4 in March. Programmes include a documentary exploring how the second world war proved the making of British ballet; Darcey Bussell telling the story of ballerinas through history she has been inspired by; and Tamara Rojo, artistic director of English National Ballet, dancing Swan Lake.

 

 

 

The Telegraph

Although not the best quality – it is not a master tape, but was taken from the TV monitor filming the ballet – it is being digitally enhanced by the corporation to make the images clearer.

 

 

 

The Daily Mail

 

BBC News



#5 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:18 PM

Reviews of the Joffrey Ballet in a mixed bill.

 

The Chicago Tribune.

 

Floor work is just one of the challenges Clawson has for these classical dancers, though he also exploits their ballet training, especially in the unison sections. Despite the occasional detour into conflict, expressed in duets that could be danced with a bit more abandon, "Crossing Ashland" is overall a blessed shot of sun.

 

 

Chicago Now

 

One of the repertory pieces from Contemporary Choreographers is Christopher Wheeldon’s Continuum. I did not like it. I don’t doubt Wheeldon’s masterful ability to choreograph—I’ve seen and enjoyed his other pieces, including Morphosis—but this one was distracting and overthought. The choreography itself wasn’t the problem; it was the dizzying score (by Gyorgy Ligeti) that accompanied it. The piece is described as “a stunning abstract rendering of music into movement and patterns.” It certainly was abstract, but I found it more of a sensory attack than stunning.

 

 

The Chicago Sun-Times

 

It takes immense daring to stage a triumvirate of works as challenging to both the Joffrey’s dancers and audiences as the one assembled here by artistic director Ashley Wheater. But the risk will unquestionably pay off. The mix of Chicago choreographer Brock Clawson’s “Crossing Ashland,” British choreographer Christopher Wheeldon’s “Continuum,” and Swedish choreographer Alexander Ekman’s “Episode 31” turns out to be a brilliant, multifaceted showcase of the nearly impossible-to-define term “contemporary ballet.” It also reveals some truly eye-popping facets of the Joffrey company.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:21 PM

Dancer Lawrence Gradus is dead at age 76.

In 1961, he became a soloist with Jerome Robbins’s Ballets U.S.A., performing around the world, and returned after a couple of years to rejoin American Ballet Theatre in Manhattan.

 

During Expo 67, in Montreal, he accepted an offer to dance a modern tap routine on a Maurice Chevalier show and never looked back.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:23 PM

Terry Teachout writes on the controversy over Picasso's "Le Tricorne" in The Wall Street Journal.

 

Justice Matthew F. Cooper of the New York State Supreme Court issued a temporary injunction last Friday preventing RFR Holding from moving the painting, which had been scheduled to be taken down two days later, until the case can be heard on March 11. "I don't want to be the judge who has a Picasso destroyed," he said. And Belmont Freeman, an architect who worked on a 2008 restoration of the Four Seasons, published a piece in Architectural Record claiming that RFR Holding wasn't telling the truth when it said that the wall could collapse. "The terrible prospect of a slab of travertine [marble] delaminating from the wall and ripping through the curtain, as RFR claims, is utterly specious," he wrote.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:05 PM

Comment by Philip Kennicott in The Washington Post on the nomination of Jane Chu as the head of the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

But the President has put her in a box. Obama allowed 13  months to pass between the departure of former NEA Chairman Rocco Landesman and his appointment of Chu yesterday. That not only leaves her with little time to make a mark on the agency, it is distressing evidence that the president and his administration are not particularly interested in the wellbeing of the NEA or the role of the arts within American culture........

 

 

Related.

 

"The NEA has been without a leader for too long — and the institution has suffered as a result," said Gioia, who served as NEA chairman from 2003 to 2009. He is a professor of poetry and public culture at USC.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:10 PM

Irina Dvorovenko and Maxim Beloserkovsky perform at the Sochi Winter International Arts Festival.

 

The couple is originally from Ukraine, where they met at ages 10 and 11 in the Kiev Ballet School. About three weeks ago, they were invited to the festival and thought it would be fun to return to this seaside report, even if only for a two-day stint. “The last time I was in Sochi was in 1986,” said Beloserkovsky. “I was a kid. My mom made it happen. I saw foreigners for the first time.”

 

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 12:57 AM

The Australian Ballet prepares a revival of "Manon."

But while Cinderella was created from scratch, at a cost of $1.75 million, and performed for the first time in 2013, Manon will feature on the Australian Ballet’s roster for the fifth time in 2014.

 

The set and costume is just back from Japan, where it was hired out to another ballet company. This means that Car and the 22-person strong wardrobe department have been working furiously since late 2013, restoring hundreds of costumes for busy scenes filled with beggars, prostitutes and thieves.

 

“Even the beggars have hats!” Car exclaims.

 

 




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