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Tuesday, February 11


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#1 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:16 AM

A preview of Grand Rapids Ballet's Valentine's Day program.

Balanchine's athletic choreography, set to Stravinsky's neo-classical, jazz-flavored capriccio for solo piano and orchestra, has dancers racing across the stage. "It's an incredible work by George Balanchine," Barker said.

 

"The Moor's Pavane," based on the tale of the ill-fated Moor of Venice from Shakespeare's "Othello," is a mid -20th century classic of American modern dance.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:17 AM

Orlando Ballet presents "Romeo and Juliet."

“My career started with ‘Romeo and Juliet,’” he explains. “I have always wanted to do my own ‘Romeo and Juliet.’ I know the score inside and out. I feel this inside my cells.”

 

In the early 1980s, Hill was a dancer with American Ballet Theatre. He was understudying Romeo when the unexpected happened. “The Romeo went down, the understudy got a chance, and I went on,” Hill recalls.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:19 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

 

Though he has limited stage time, the lone male figure establishes a memorable presence, one perhaps suggesting some mythological, Hermes-like, Guide of the Dead character. As danced by a mercurial Anthony Huxley, who performs his flourished choreography with a flamelike flicker, this character becomes the ballet’s most distinct and memorable individual.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:22 AM

A look at three young male dancers of New York City Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

Mr. Catazaro is one of three young male dancers who have suddenly gained new eminence during City Ballet’s winter season of multiple debuts: Russell Janzen and Joseph Gordon are the other standouts. Although Mr. Catazaro is still a corps dancer and has evident limitations in virtuosity, his partnership with Ms. Mearns has brought to mind a nickname applied over 30 years ago by Edward Gorey to the appearances of Peter Martins and Suzanne Farrell in certain Balanchine ballets: “Mr. and Mrs. God.”

 

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:24 AM

An interview with Matthias Bodnar, the chef of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre's school.

“It gets pitched,” says Bodnar with a laugh as he prepares to feed the nearly two dozen students dinner. “It's part of what they have to accept.”

 

Bodnar of the Mexican War Streets neighborhood has been with the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre for four seasons serving as chef for students of the school and summer intensive programs. The job appealed to the personal chef, who was looking to expand his healthy-cooking repertoire.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:25 AM

A review of Ballet West by Kathy Adams in The Salt Lake Tribune.

 

The onstage rapport between Tilton and principal dancer Christiana Bennett as Princess Aurora is intimate, regal and playful. They share a similar movement quality and gather energy from one another. Bennett is an elegant dancer, and her characteristic strength has found an inner softness this season. Her dancing became more confident in Acts II and III, although in the Rose Adagio her pirouette into a complete upper-body drop over and return to center was big and inspired.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:29 AM

A photo gallery of José Manuel Carreño with his charges at San Jose Ballet.

San Jose Ballet Artistic Director José Manuel Carreño teaches a company class at Ballet San Jose, in San Jose, Calif. on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:30 AM

A review of Atlanta Ballet in "Romeo et Juliette" by  Cynthia Bond Perry for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

 

In 1996, when Maillot’s version received its premiere with Les Ballets de Monte-Carlo, there had been at least 85 dance productions based on Shakespeare’s play. Unlike many of these, Maillot shies away from realism. The ballet isn’t set in 14th-century Verona or any specific place or time. Instead, Maillot highlights Prokofiev’s music. He structures his ballet like a film narrative, where characters’ impulses, actions and reactions drive the story. This leads the audience from rough-handed carousing to playful humor, to love, complicated by murder and revenge.

 

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:38 AM

Two reviews of New York City Ballet from danceviewtimes.

 

Mary Cargill

For me, many recent performances are haunted by ghosts of former dancers, and it has seemed to be a series of unconnected slightly saccharine exercises. But it burst alive again this season, with a newish, beautifully rehearsed cast.  One of my ghosts is Jenifer Ringer, with Christopher Wheeldon, soaring through the so-called giggle dance--also known as Apricot.  The music seemed to come directly from her back, float through her arms, and served to the audience with grace and charm.  Ringer has graduated from Apricot to Pink, and she danced this at her farewell performance.  Pink is a much larger and richer role, but her early qualities still shown through.  She danced simply and graciously, with eloquent and soft arms, focusing on her fellow dancers.  There were a few small pauses, as if she were savoring this last performance; rarely have I seen the moment when Pink offers her hand to Mauve (the elegant Jared Angle) performed with such elegant deliberation,....

 

 

 

Leigh Witchel

 

Scarlett has set a similar, stronger, work at Miami City Ballet, “Euphotic.” There are echoes of the earlier work here: facing away from us at the opening, the cast took a slow walk from the back that revealed a soloist. Here again, the corps was a mass, but it was revelation, not anonymity that Scarlett was after. Another device he likes: there was often one couple in the back echoing the solo couple – again not for anonymity, but universality. Somewhere down the hall, across the street or across an ocean, someone is having the same argument as you.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 06:00 PM

Dancers of today have it easy, say Gillian Lynne and Beryl Grey.

 

Emphasising that ballet is not a "soft touch", Lynne said: "I don't buy this new thing that everybody says they're overworked. Dance is a hard world. You can't be pushed enough. I've always had to watch my food. There's nothing wrong with it. Most dancers want to be slim. Quite honestly, dancers have to diet. You have to be underweight."

 

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:39 AM

A story on the film "La Passion Noureev" by Marjorie Liebert for Broadway World.

 

Fabrice Herrault, a dance collector/historian/film-maker with an impressive history as a dancer and ballet teacher, was commissioned by Les Etés de la Danse in Paris to make this film. All of the film clips, many from the 1960's and 1970's, came from Herrault's own collection.

 

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:28 AM

A review of "Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq" by Diana Barth in The Epoch Times.

 

She did survive. She was later moved to Warm Springs, Ga., America’s foremost treatment center, where Balanchine nursed her, creating movements to help her regain control of her muscles. Jerry Robbins also visited, taking some remarkable photographs. Some of these photos are included in the film, along with special archival footage by both Robbins and Martha Swope.

 

 

 




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