dirac

Monday, February 10

9 posts in this topic

A review of Jenifer Ringer's farewell performance by Alastair Macaulay Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

The performance was a reminder of Ms. Ringer’s rare warmth and generosity. Her face, with a beauty that reliably catches the light, is particularly expressive, her eyes part of her strong connection with everyone else onstage. When, during one of her romantic duets, a child in the theater cried out, “Mama,” that might have been jarring (if touching — it may have been one of Ms. Ringer’s two young children). But it fit right into the atmosphere of love flowing from and to the woman of the hour.

Edited by dirac
Corrected to reflect the right author. Thanks to alert reader Jayne for pointing out the error!

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A review of the Royal Ballet by Zoe Anderson in The Independent.

McGregor’s dancers do him proud. For the first time since she joined The Royal Ballet this season, Osipova was dancing in an ensemble rather than as a superstar. She takes on McGregor’s style with commitment and grand authority. She hid her accident well on stage: there was no sign that she had been injured. McRae is taut and composed, while Cuthbertson danced with fiery attack. Despite its dancers, despite Auerbach’s modish designs, the whole ballet feels muted and dull.

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A story on José Manuel Carreño taking the reins at Ballet San Jose by Karen D'Souza in The San Jose Mercury News.

On the eve of its 2014 program -- the first under his stewardship -- the cash-strapped troupe had to tighten its belt in the wake of sagging ticket sales and donations. That means there will be no live orchestra for its "Neoclassical to Now" program, which runs Friday through Sunday at San Jose's Center for the Performing Arts. Still, Carreño is not one to be fazed by obstacles.

"Right now, it is hard but we are surviving. My job is to raise enough money to make us healthy," said the 45-year-old, who took the helm last fall. "It will not be easy. But that has never stopped me before. I think it is doable."

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Janice Berman's list of "10 to Watch in Dance" for San Francisco Classical Voice.

5. Ballet San Jose soldiers on. Financially strapped as it nears its season opener, the company’s had to cancel its plans for live music for the opening program of the season, eliminate Saturday matinees, and delay one premiere until next season. But there are reasons for hope, notably efforts to establish chaperoned housing at San Jose State for students in its summer ballet school, as well as artistic director Jose Manuel Carreno’s Young Male Dancer initiative to identify and train promising dancers, with an eye toward offering them places in the company. Too, there’s the ongoing relationship with American Ballet Theatre to raise BSJ’s artistic quality. All the company needs is money, and what dance troupe doesn’t? The season begins Friday, Valentine’s Day, at San Jose Center for the Performing Arts.

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A review of Ballet West's "The Sleeping Beauty" by Heather Hayes in The Deseret News.

Ballet West’s long-time principal dancer Christiana Bennett snagged the part of Aurora once again. She’ll share it with Katherine Lawrence, Arolyn Williams and Beckanne Sisk during the run.

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Q&A with Stephanie Saland.

Q. What about your repertory?

A. I believe that many of the Balanchine roles given to me were apropos of the way that my physiology and spirit translated onstage. For the most part I joke that I had all the feminine "swooning" and glamorous roles early on, and they held me in good stead over the years. Additionally, I had and have a comic bent and find that it is a wonderful tool in which to open up. So anything tongue in cheek, or with a comic arc, was always a bonus for me.

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An interview with John Neumeier.

Yet you do seem to work with text frequently, or at least with story (Neumeier's oeuvre includes ballets based on the Odyssey, Hamlet, Othello, Alexandre Dumas's Lady of the Camellias, Thomas Mann's Death in Venice, and Ferenc Molnar's Liliom).

I refer to text in the sense that I do not say this is Shakespeare's Midsummer Night's Dream -- I say that this is after a play by Shakespeare, which means I have read this play, it has moved me, and it's moved me to move dancers, whom I hope will move an audience.

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Boston Ballet visits Harvard.

Held in the Dance Center at Harvard, the Boston Ballet talk offered dancers, students, and members of the Cambridge community not only the chance to see movements of these pieces in a close, intimate setting, but also the opportunity to hear the dancers and choreographers—including José Martinez himself, through a video clip—talk about the process and answer questions from the audience about these more contemporary ballet pieces.

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A story on Kayla Rowser of Nashville Ballet by Rainesford Alexandra for The Huffington Post.

Rowser is quick to note that she sees herself as a dancer -- not necessarily an African American dancer. She does not view her race as an obstacle she must overcome, but does allow it to act as a catalyst for a broader conversation about a shift in ballet's culture. In order for ballet to keep up with it's changing audience, ballet better be ready to bridge the gap between fantasy and reality, maintaining its otherworldly escapism but including the variety represented in the people buying tickets. That, Rowser believes, is key: "For it to be more relatable, you want to see all different types of body types, different lines, all different things on stage."

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