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Friday, February 7


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#1 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:14 PM

A feature on Ethan Stiefel and the Royal New Zealand Ballet by Marina Harss in The New York Times.

 

 

The company’s commitment to local audiences runs deep. In addition to frequent international tours, each year the troupe zigzags the islands for weeks at a time. Every two years, it splits into two groups and visits 50 locales. In the smaller towns, the dancers often find themselves performing in school auditoriums, gyms and town halls. Because there are no ranks (an anomaly), a dancer might perform a leading role one day, then melt into the ensemble the next. Life on the road builds a plucky spirit. “I think there’s a lot of personality and gutsiness to the collective energy,” Ms. Murphy said recently in a cafe near Union Square.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:22 PM

A review of the Royal Ballet's new triple bill by Hanna Weibye for The Arts Desk.

 

Unfortunately, as with most of the new McGregor I’ve seen in the last couple of years, Tetractys was probably far more fascinating to make than it is to watch. On a mostly black stage, varying configurations of dancers duet, trio and sextet with each other, their patterning related to the complex geometry of the music........ Changes in the colour of both glyphs and costumes (predictable primaries give way to honeycomb, custard, parma violet and azure) cipher changes in the music’s tonality and construction. Twelve dancers must twist and stretch themselves through McGregor’s kinetic choreography to bring this elaborate 3D fugue to life for 40 whole minutes (at least 10 too many in my book). Yes, it’s thoughtful and careful and must have been a hell of a lot of work. It’s just cold, cold, cold.

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:28 PM

Wendy Whelan cancels performances of "Restless Creature."

“Following hip surgery that took place just one week after the Aug. 14, 2013, premiere of ‘Restless Creature,’ Wendy Whelan, in consultation with her doctors, concluded that her body needs more time to heal,” said Dance Council executive director Paul Organisak in a statement.
 
“I have worked diligently following my surgery to meet my deadline for being rehearsal ready, but I simply need more time to strengthen and heal. I have to honor my body’s wishes,” Ms. Whelan said in a statement.

 
Related.
 

Rescheduled tour dates will be announced later. Ms. Whelan said she still intends to dance the work in London in July at the Royal Opera House’s Linbury Studio Theater. And she said that she was working for at least three hours each day dancing, strengthening her body and getting physical therapy, and that she plans on dancing in City Ballet’s spring season.



#4 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 05:36 PM

Ballet and dance have a prominent place in the opening ceremonies of the Olympic Winter Games in Sochi.

 

The music included pieces by Alexander Borodin, Georgy Sviridov, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky, with selections from “Swan Lake” and “The Nutcracker.” There were roles for the opera soprano Anna Netrebko; the prima ballerina Diana Vishneva; and Russia’s best-known conductor, Valery Gergiev of the Mariinsky Theater. There were Cossack dancers and singers from the more than 600-year-old Sretensky Monastery Choir.

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 06:05 PM

A television interview with Gen Horiuchi. Video.

 

But in 1998, the Olympics were all he could think about. Horiuchi choreographed the ballet part of the Winter Olympics opening ceremony in Nagano.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 06:07 PM

A preview of Miami City Ballet's "West Side Story Suite" by Jordan Levin in The Miami Herald.

Staging this musical-ballet hybrid added several layers of demands to the exacting process of mounting a Robbins work. Miami City Ballet had to get permission not just from the Jerome Robbins Trust, which holds the copyrights to his dances and hires people to teach them, but from organizations overseeing the work of Bernstein, Sondheim and Arthur Laurents, who co-wrote the libretto with Robbins. Even the set and costumes must match the original. The company had to cast dancers who fit the characters and submit recordings of them singing.

 

Jean-Pierre Frohlich, an advisor to the trust and a former NYCB dancer who was Robbins’ assistant, spent four weeks teaching West Side Story Suite to MCB last summer.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 09 February 2014 - 06:08 PM

Susan Roemer starts an athletic apparel business.

 

Roemer, a Milwaukee native, joined Smuin in 2007 and took up sewing on a used machine purchased through Craigslist in late 2011, using patterns traced on Christmas wrap. "I brought the machine home, took it out of its case and stared at it," she recalled. "Referencing YouTube tutorials and hours of trial and error - many errors - I learned to thread the machine and sew a basic stitch."

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:21 AM

An interview with Ethan Stiefel by Gia Kourlas in Time Out New York.

 

Are you thinking of staying on?

What I can say is that I’m open to the discussion, and that we’re going to have that discussion. My main objective, and has been here from day one, is to make the most out of the opportunity that’s been presented and to go step by step in the way that I didn’t think ever—really, it never crossed my mind that I’d be living and working in New Zealand. It came to me and that opportunity was presented and so now I’m here doing that. So in the same sense, I’d like to look ahead a little bit. But at the same time, I just have to be focused on what I’m doing right now, and make sure that I’m doing the best job that I can, to let the work speak for itself. What I could say is that I don’t think that this is where I’ll spend the rest of my life. That much I do know.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 10 February 2014 - 01:25 AM

An obituary for Jean Babilée by Clement Crisp in The Financial Times.

 

..... Of his appearances in more recent times (he was performing until a decade ago and motorcycling until he was 85 – his life, like his art, seemed ever touched by physical daring) the most extraordinary was his return to Le Jeune Homme et La Mort at the age of 60.

 

....The curtain rose on Babilée. He raised his arm to look at his watch. An audience of devotees was transfixed as four decades disappeared. His hair was grey but the body was as lean and powerful as ever, the physical drive astonishing, the intensity of emotion prodigious.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:58 AM

Q&A with Sarah Tallman of Wonderbound.

 

Tell me about the choreographic process. Where do you draw inspiration? Do you have a general idea as you go into the studio to work?

 

The choreographic process for this particular ballet has been very different for me. The Confluence String Quartet gathered several post modern string quartets that I had the opportunity to choose from. All of them were beautiful, but I was drawn to and slightly familiar with Leos Janacek’s “Intimate Letters”, and was delighted that this piece was in their repertoire. The composition is deliciously scattered, intense, and in some cases a bit cacophonous, all of which I find exhilarating and challenging.....

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:27 AM

A plea for ballet and dance to be more accessible to a broader range of students by Deborah Orr in The Guardian.

What's not obvious, however, is why ballet should be so single-mindedly in thrall to professionalism, while football comes in all shapes and sizes, accessible to all. Given that so many little girls want to go to ballet classes, and that it's good exercise, why is it that dance remains so peripheral to physical exercise at school, for example? There's obviously a big gender element here, but maybe it's even bigger than we quite realise.

 

 




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