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Wednesday, February 5


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#1 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:40 AM

A post in Judith Mackrell's blog about the results of a recent Dance Gazette survey asking artistic directors their views about the state of the repertory.

 

In identifying future classics, the survey shows remarkable agreement on the main contender, Wayne McGregor's Chroma. According to Karen Kain (National Ballet of Canada) this 2006 work is "a true modern classic. It's made such a great impact on our audience and it's now danced everywhere." 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:06 AM

The Tokyo Ballet celebrates its fiftieth anniversary.

 

To launch a full year’s commemoration of its ethos — creative exchanges in dance on a national and global stage — the company’s party kicks off with the Japan première of “Romeo and Juliet” by the U.S. dancer/choreographer and artistic director of the Hamburg Ballet, John Neumeier. The production runs at Tokyo Bunka Kaikan in Ueno from Feb. 6-9.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:07 AM

An interview with Edward Clug.

"Radio and Juliet began simply, with a duet to Radiohead's Life in a Glasshouse from Amnesiac," he says. "It won a bronze medal. One of the jury members told me that the duet reminded him of Romeo and Juliet. So I thought I should think about Radiohead and Romeo and Juliet."

 

Clug's decision to use Radiohead's music for his interpretation of Romeo and Juliet was both about his personal connection to the music and his belief that the music connects with the narrative. "Some of the songs I could only listen to late at night when I was happy or depressed. They just put me back together."

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:08 AM

Ballet Nebraska launches its new Encore series.

 

The series takes place in a new performance space called Encore, bringing audience members into an intimate, informal atmosphere. Ballet Nebraska artists will introduce each work, and audience members will have an opportunity to meet the performers.

 

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:04 PM

Reviews of "Tanaquil Le Clercq: Afternoon of a Faun."

 

The Village Voice

 

But if polio ended Le Clercq's run as a dancer, Buirski clearly shows that the spark that made her great couldn't be snuffed out so easily. Even in a wheelchair, Le Clercq, who died in 2000 at age 71, commands authority with little more than her captivating, wicked smile. But then, being a dancer is dependent on knowing which muscles to use, and which are most important.

 

 

The Huffington Post

 

Balanchine imagined he had brought on the illness. Just before a European tour, many in the corps de ballet were inoculated against polio. She, however, wanted to wait. She collapsed in Copenhagen, ending up in an iron lung. Balanchine did what he could to restore her spirit. Her friendship with Robbins is evoked in letters read by the actors Marianne Bowers and Michael Stuhlbarg.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:22 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Melody Datz in The Stranger.

 

On opening night, PNB ballerina Kaori Nakamura danced the role of Princess Aurora. In this role, Nakamura is perfection: The precision with which she finishes every single movement from the tiniest bourrée to ass-whooping series of leaps or turns is both artful and a physical marvel. Some dancers will ride the sparkles and spotlight of the role of fairy princess so hard that you just wind up staring at a tiara and a toothy smile, but Nakamura’s technical abilities and her passion for the art are visible in her facial expressions, her fingertips, her movements, and the way she relates to both the audience and her fellow dancers.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:29 PM

The Francia Russell Center will be demolished to make way for a light rail route.

 

The East Link light rail alignment at 136th Place Northeast and Northeast 16th Street will run a line around that corner, slightly east of the academy. Because Sound Transit prefers a 30 mph curve — to mitigate noise and reduce maintenance needs — complete demolition of the FRC is required.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:35 PM

A review of Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater by George Jackson for danceviewtimes.

 

The problem with randomized choreography, not just McGregor’s but also that of his predecessor, Merce Cunningham, is that the mind abhors chaos. We imposes pattern, shape, order on dancing that seems to be arbitrary, haphazard, chance. For “Chroma”, John Pawson’s set of flat and spacious oblongs in intense un-colors (grey, white, black) gives McGregor’s movement more form than do the muted colors of Moritz Junge’s costumes. The musical score by Jack White and Joby Talbot, although harsh, remains background sound. Despite the set and our mental suppositions, McGregor’s motion doesn’t end up dancing as intriguingly as Merce Cunningham’s. Is the latter’s knack due to his initial choices of movement material and not to his arrangement procedure?

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:37 PM

Q&A with Teresa Reichlen.

Rail: What has been most challenging about learning the role ["Diamonds"]?

 

Reichlen: The aura around it. It’s one of the grand Balanchine ballerina roles, along with the second movement of Symphony in C and a few others. There are high expectations. The music is also so amazing—it’s a challenge to live up to it, and to the dancers who’ve done it before. It can be a challenge to make it your own.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:39 PM

American Contemporary Ballet celebrates Balanchine.Q&A with Lincoln Jones.

Why did you select Chaconne for this program?

 

Lincoln Jones: Chaconne is one of Balanchine's lesser-known masterpieces, and it is a ballet that I think is going to become increasingly recognized as time goes on. I chose it for two reasons. The first was for the audience. DANCE+DESIGN is largely about helping our audience learn about ballet, and Chaconne is great for that. It is very pure. It isn't complex, but it is masterfully constructed. The second reason was for the dancers. Chaconne is pure dancing but made of classical steps. There are no big tricks; the entire ballet rests on the dancers' ability to musically shape the phrases.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 09:08 PM

An interview with Alexandra Cunningham.

 

“It's very demanding,” she said speaking of her chosen profession. She told me training under Barbara Crockett, the founder of the Sacramento Ballet, helped “instill the discipline” in me. “She made me realize that dancing isn't all pretty and tutus and easy. It takes a lot of work.”

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 09:09 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

 

In “DGV: Danse à Grande Vitesse,” Christopher Wheeldon is driven by the momentum of Michael Nyman’s score, “MGV (Musique à Grande Vitesse),” which was written in honor of the inauguration of the speedy French train the TGV. With its mechanized corps and four pas de deux, the ballet seems as if it were made in a factory.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 09:22 PM

BalletBoyz: The Talent perform this week.

 

Their latest outing features two carefully choreographed pieces, Fallen and Serpent, put together by Russell Maliphant and Liam Scarlett.

 

“The performance is youthful and exciting and the energy really comes across,” co-founder Michael Nunn says.

 

 

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 12:48 AM

A preview of Ballet San Jose's season opener.

 

In budget-balancing moves, Ballet San Jose recently announced an end to its Saturday matinees, as well as the postponement until the 2015 season of its premiere of Jorge Amarante's Grapa Tango. There will also be no live music for the season opener--recorded soundtracks will be substituted--which runs 8 p.m. Feb. 14 and 15, and 1:30 p.m. Feb. 16, at the Center for the Performing Arts, 255 S. Almaden Blvd., San Jose.

 



#15 dirac

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:04 AM

A report on a benefit for the Youth America Grand Prix by Marjorie Liebert for Broadway World.

On January 27, 2014, in a large studio at New York's City Center, I had the pleasure of attending a benefit for YAGP, hosted by Barbara Brandt. American Ballet Theatre principals, Marcelo Gomez and James Whiteside, and soloist Misty Copeland gave up their day off to participate in this exhibition.

 

 

 




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