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Mme. Hermine

Sunday, February 2

3 posts in this topic

Alastair Macaulay reviews the New York City Ballet in a new work by Liam Scarlett:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/03/arts/dance/underworld-notes-in-the-homeric-sense.html?ref=dance&_r=0

Now, in his intense but murky debut creation for New York City Ballet that received its world premiere on Friday night at the David H. Koch Theater, Mr. Scarlett returns to the Greek underworld. Its name is “Acheron,” after one of the five rivers that ran through the realm of the dead.

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A new reality show is reviewed in the Guardian:

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/feb/03/big-ballet-c4-plus-size-swan-lake-reality-tv

Five hundred people replied to the advert. "Have you ever dreamt of being a ballet-dancer but feel your size holds you back?" it asked. "Have you ever imagined dancing on a big stage in front of an adoring crowd? We are looking for talented dancers aged 18-55 to take part in our new series about ballet. No previous ballet experience necessary. If you're interested to hear more, we'd love to talk to you!"

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Two reviews of the Mariinsky Ballet in "Swan Lake" from danceviewtimes.

George Jackson

....Often the tempi of Tchaikovsky’s music for the Odette role’s great adagio are made monotonously slow. Esina and conductor Alexey Repnikov treated the timing aptly, it was as natural as breathing. To portray the story’s villainess, Odile - the Odette imposter – Esina danced also with her eyes. She relished being evil. The looks she shot her victim Siegfried – prince, hunter, deceived hero – could have hypnotized him as much as did her dancing. She was a sharp and precise Odile although she could have given her turns a more expansive freedom.

Alexandra Tomalonis

There’s a tiny new change that I don’t remember seeing the last time the company brought this ballet: the omission of one of the few remaining mime fragments, the Princess Mother’s reminder to the Prince that he has come of age and must marry. This was once probably a full conversation; it had been reduced to about two gestures [“You must marry.” “I don’t want to.”] and without it, Siegfried’s role disappears. There’s no opportunity for him to be introspective, much less exhibit the fabled melancholy. The first act is now merely about a birthday party and the gift of a crossbow (over which much is made).....

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