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Pete Seeger has died


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#1 sandik

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 11:10 PM

So says the NYT

 

"The key to the future of the world,” he said in 1994, “is finding the optimistic stories and letting them be known.”



#2 Helene

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 01:37 AM

Oh, no: he was supposed to live to be 1,000.

 

Rest in peace, Mr. Seeger.



#3 Drew

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 01:35 PM

Very sad...



#4 sandik

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 04:57 PM

Seeger and his wife produced a UHF television folk music series in the 1950s called Rainbow Quest, and a number of them have made their way onto YouTube (no surprise there) -- here's one of the episodes, with the Clancy Brothers as guest



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 10:28 PM

Thank you for posting the news, sandik. Assuredly we will never see his like again.

 

Little birdie, little birdie,
Come sing to me your song.
Got a short time to stay here
And a long time to be gone.

Little birdie, little birdie,
What makes you fly so high?
Dissatisfied, dissatisfied
And a-caring never a bit to die.

Little birdie, little birdie,
What makes your wings so blue?
It's nothing else but grieving,
But grieving over you.

Fly down, fly down, little birdie,
And sing to me your song.
Sing it now, while I'm with you,
Can't hear you when I'm gone.



#6 kfw

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 09:53 AM

Fifteen of the umpteen musicians Seeger influenced talk about him in this NY Times article: ‘Loud, Strong, Committed and Always in Search of America’.

 

I've been listening to a wonderful concert Pete did with Big Bill Broonzy in 1956. It's easy to find online.



#7 sandik

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 11:26 AM

And I've been listening to lots of Rainbow Quest, which is such a sweet collection of folk musicians.

 

Thanks for the link to the NYT tributes -- it's full of lovely stuff, but I giggled at this, from Arlo Guthrie:

 

"I also bought my first car from Pete. It was actually his son’s car, a 1957 MGA – the kind Elvis Presley drove in the movies. When I told my mother I was buying it, she said, ‘Arlo, folk singers don’t drive sports cars!’ And I said, ‘Mom, Pete Seeger is selling me this car,’ and there was nothing more she could say."



#8 dirac

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 10:28 AM

"Umpteen"? At least. :) Thank you for that link, kfw. I note with pleasure that Bruce Springsteen's appreciation, the first in the list, mentions the name of John Hammond, one of the great behind-the-scenes heroes of American music.

 

“When Pete was on the blacklist in the early ‘60s, his old friend, the legendary music man John Hammond, came to the rescue and signed him to a Columbia Records contract. In the early ‘70s, the same John Hammond signed an unknown kid from New Jersey to a Columbia record contract. When John died in 1987, both Pete and I were asked to play at his funeral and that was the first time I laid eyes on Pete.

 



#9 sandik

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 03:32 PM

 

"Umpteen"? At least. smile.png Thank you for that link, kfw. I note with pleasure that Bruce Springsteen's appreciation, the first in the list, mentions the name of John Hammond, one of the great behind-the-scenes heroes of American music.

 

“When Pete was on the blacklist in the early ‘60s, his old friend, the legendary music man John Hammond, came to the rescue and signed him to a Columbia Records contract. In the early ‘70s, the same John Hammond signed an unknown kid from New Jersey to a Columbia record contract. When John died in 1987, both Pete and I were asked to play at his funeral and that was the first time I laid eyes on Pete.

 

 

I think there was an American Masters program (or some other PBS profile) on Hammond several years ago -- I only saw part of it and was still gobsmacked at how much he accomplished.



#10 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 08:42 AM

In memoriam, PBS / American Masters is rebroadcasting "The Power of Song," a film about Pete Seeger. Check your local listings for broadcast times.

 

You can also stream the film in its entirety here on the American Masters website. I don't know how long they plan to leave it up, so if you're really interested in watching it, don't put it off for too long.

 

While you're there, you can see what other full episodes are available for streaming here. One of them is "Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance."



#11 sandik

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:25 AM

and if you rummage around on YouTube, you can watch the documentary on the Weavers, "Wasn't That A Time."



#12 kfw

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 12:33 PM

and if you rummage around on YouTube, you can watch the documentary on the Weavers, "Wasn't That A Time."

 

Ah, thanks for the reminder! I saw that when it was released and loved it. 



#13 AlbanyGirl

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 07:49 PM

Thank you for this thread.  I, too, am in mourning over the great Pete, a man of enormous convictions who eloquently and correctly told the House Un-American Activities Committee exactly what to do with their interrogations and black-listings, a man who saved a great river and a humanitarian who knew the power of song to make positive change.  I've been listening to so many songs lately, songs I listened to in my youth as a 'folkie' and they resonate now more than ever.  Where have all the flowers gone, indeed.  Rest in Peace, Mr. Pete Seeger.  We will miss you forever.    



#14 diane

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 07:38 AM

As a young child in the 60s I grew up listening (and dancing) to Pete Seeger (and others in the same "vein") on LPs and '45s. 

 

I am glad he was around as long as he was and that he kept on singing and saying what needs to be sung and said. 

 

We need more like him. 

 

-d-




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