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Monday, January 27


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10 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:08 AM

The Russian State Ballet of Siberia presents "Swan Lake" in Bristol.

 

There was a similar battle for our attention between Nikolay Chevychelov's finely self- assured Prince Siegfried and Demid Zykov's eye-catchingly flamboyant villainous Von Rothbart, with once again the villain just coming out on top.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:10 AM

The winners of the National Dance Awards are announced.

 

The Stage

 

Russell Maliphant has taken home the prize for best modern choreography at this year’s National Dance Awards, seeing off competition from Matthew Bourne, Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui and Guilherme Botelho.

 

 

BBC News

 

Rambert's Dane Hurst won best male dancer and Natalia Osipova best female.

Osipova won the prize for her performances with the Mikhailovsky Ballet, which also won outstanding company, and has also danced as a guest artist with the Royal Ballet and Bolshoi Ballet.

 

 

The Guardian

 

 

The winners of this year's Critics' Circle National Dance awards were announced today at the Place theatre – a list of 13, whittled down from more than 200 nominated performances. With 60 voting members, all with different tastes and viewing schedules, some of the initial variety – and surprise – of those original nominations may have been lost. Yet there are still intriguing names among the final cut.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:15 AM

Production is scheduled to begin on a new ballet-themed cable drama from Starz, previously announced, 

 

Created by Moira Walley-Beckett, Flesh and Bone follows Claire, a ballet dancer who has a distinctly troubled past, as she joins a prestigious ballet company in New York. The dark and gritty series will unflinchingly explore the dysfunction and glamour of the ballet world. Dancer Sarah Hay (Black Swan) has been cast in the lead role as Clare. She leads a cast which includes a number of world-renowned dancers, such as former American Ballet Theatre principal dancer Irina Dvorovenko and current soloist Sascha Radetsky.

 

 

Related.

 

The series, which is to debut in 2015, centers on a talented but emotionally fragile ballet dancer and her fellow dancers in a ballet company in New York. Professional dancer Sarah Hay (above right with Walley-Beckett) has landed the lead role of Claire. Hay appeared in"Black Swan" as a member of the ballet company, but this will be her first on-camera acting role.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:16 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet in "Giselle" by Irene Hsiao for SF Weekly.

 

The disguises were thin in opening night's cast, which featured Yuan Yuan Tan in the role of Giselle, with Davit Karapetyan as Count Albrecht. While Albrecht's irrepressible nobility might be understood -- indeed indicated in an instinctive reach for his absent sword in an altercation with Hilarion -- Tan, whose delicate spidery limbs so suit her to unearthly and abstract roles, makes an implausible rustic. That she and Albrecht should be drawn to each other seems less a product of real attraction than the simple fact that neither of them belongs in this town.

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:19 AM

An Associated Press obituary for the conductor Ottavio de Rosa, who has died at age 91.

 

De Rosa played in and later conducted the orchestra at the New York City Ballet for choreographer George Balanchine. When former NYCB star Edward Villella founded the Miami ballet in 1986, de Rosa was his first choice for music director. De Rosa also held similar positions at the Pittsburgh and Boston ballets.

 

 


 


#6 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:22 AM

A review of David Parsons and Ballet Next by Robert Gottlieb in The New York Observer.

 

What Reeder shows us is a distinctive imagination, a strong response to music and a sophisticated vocabulary of steps. Is this great choreography? It isn’t, but it’s more valid than most of what we see from most ballet companies in their desperate search for repertory. If the School of American Ballet, or Juilliard, were to commission work from him, he would do them proud.

 

As for Wiles, she was front and center in all three ballets, and that was overkill (as well as leading to interminable intermissions). She’s too quirky to be so ubiquitous. Let’s hope that she continues to expand her company’s horizons, not only with worthy repertory but with other ballerinas with whom to share the honors. 

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:24 AM

A review of the Royal Ballet in "Hansel and Gretel" by Clement Crisp in The Financial Times.

 

The strong cast we saw last year is largely returned for the present revival, which opened on Friday. And, as I regretfully observed last year, and must in all conscience reiterate now, the staging is dramatically predictable and interminable, with an hour-long first act and somewhat slimmer second. Liam Scarlett, be it unequivocally said, has a fine, clear talent. He can produce long passages of choreography that delight the eye, live in their music and offer great hopes for his future as a maker of ballets in a developed classic-academic manner. His plotless works know the truth of ballet’s traditions – his first creations at Covent Garden won my (and every other observer’s) heart, and promise a future for our national troupe.

 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 10:43 PM

Vadim Muntagirov jumps ship to join the Royal Ballet.

 

Muntagirov trained at the Royal Ballet Upper School but was not taken on when he graduated. Instead he joined the ENB in 2009, where he was promoted to male principal dancer in 2011 and lead principal a year later.

 

However, in interviews he hinted at being unhappy with the ENB’s often unglamorous touring schedule

 

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#9 dirac

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 10:48 PM

A review of the New York Theatre Ballet by Kia Makarechi for The Huffington Post.

 

The NYTB's take on the Lewis Carroll tale is bereft of sadness, as Alice appears to have no concerns with having fallen through the looking-glass and gets along quite well with the White Rabbit, Cheshire Cat and Mad Hatter. Even the Queen of Hearts proves mostly unthreatening, save for a singular "off with their heads." The show is presented as a vaudeville ballet, set in the New York of the early 20th century and comprised of many forms of dance. At one point, an extended presentation of "Jabberwocky" offers a hambone break, and bits of step dancing interrupt the otherwise classical ballet.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 10:15 PM

Heather Ogden and Guillaume Côté appear in an ad for the Canadian retailer Roots.

 

The cute couple, who got married in 2010, also pose in comfy Roots clothes including grey sweats, double-knit tees and peach sweaters which make us want to run to the closest store and try them on so we can channel our inner ballerina.

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:23 PM

Emily Coates writes on the position of the ballerina in relation to history and power in the ballet world for The Huffington Post.

 

The complex answer is that the relationship between young female dancers and male company directors positions the man as a mix of father figure, lover and the mutually created illusion that he is an all-knowing god. This relationship affects the sense of self and voice -- at its best it shapes and supports it; at its worst it chips away at and degrades it. Women tend not to be cultivated as leaders. The very definitions of "director" and "ballerina" sit in uneasy conflict. One well-meaning teacher from whom I sought counsel disregarded my own ambitions, and instead assured me: "Your boyfriend is going to fly." I left the ballet world soon after for modern dance, which isn't utopia but it is still more egalitarian.

 

 




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