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Sunday, January 26


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#1 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:42 AM

A story on JR's new art installation at New York City Ballet by Michael Cooper in The New York Times.

 

J R, 30, said that he liked that his work was creating a reverse migration, where the patrons in the expensive seats were going up to the cheaper seats for the views. “Now you’re inviting everyone to come up there,” he said. “And I like that, that it breaks boundaries — that anyone should be on any floor, it doesn’t matter.”

 

The installation will be opened to the public free for several hours each day from Sunday through Feb. 9.

 

 

 From the Wall Street Journal:

 

http://stream.wsj.co...99/SS-2-436517/

Stepping on a dancer''s toes is quite all right at the David H. Koch Theater this season.

 

New York City Ballet dancers, or at least life-size images of them, are lounging in a 6,500-square-foot photographic mural affixed to the floor of the upstairs lobby. Walking all over them is encouraged.

 


#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:46 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Allan Ulrich in The San Francisco Chronicle.

 

That ideal seemed to linger in the air Saturday for this cleanly scrubbed revival of the 1999 production. Tomasson set his own choreographic seal on early versions of "Giselle" byMarius Petipa, Jules Perrot and Jean Coralli with a few emendations. He transformed the peasant pas de deux in Act 1 to a quintet (very nice) and added a duet for the doomed Giselle and her cad of a lover Albrecht, which offers superior choreography-and was lusciously danced Saturday by Yuan Yuan Tan and Davit Karapetyan-but tells us nothing we didn't already know about these characters and delays the cataclysmic events at the end of the scene. The second act goes right to the heart of the tragedy, however.

 

 

 



#3 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:51 AM

A review of Alonzo King's company in Texas:

 

http://www.dallasnew...ents-ballet.ece

George Balanchine cast such an enormous shadow over neoclassical ballet that his 1983 death caused panic. What would happen to the art form with its master gone? One of the answers: Alonzo King was already reinventing it.

 

Three decades after founding Alonzo King Lines Ballet, the San Francisco choreographer has established his own style, filtering traditional ballet movement through an interest in ancient, non-Western cultures.

 



#4 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:54 AM

A story on the revival of Ballet Kelowna.

 

 

The announcement comes a year after Ballet Kelowna’s then board of directors announced it would close the company’s doors after 10 years of operation, citing insurmountable financial challenges.

That outlook has changed due to an outpouring of support from audiences, members, and donors, together with a new board of directors, which have combined to breathe new life into the organization, said Ballet Kelowna’s new board president Deborah Ward.

 

 

 

 

 



#5 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:58 AM

A review of New York Theatre Ballet by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

After intermission, the critic and historian David Vaughn entertained with a reading of Remy Charlip’s “Ten Imaginary Dances.” Then came two more substantial dances: Richard Alston’s “Light Flooding Into Darkened Rooms” and Pam Tanowitz’s “Short Memory.” These two works, the highlights ofperformances last February, remained revelatory: Mr. Alston’s evoking the 17th century and Vermeer while staying bracingly modern, Ms. Tanowitz’s honoring ballet while wittily turning it inside out. New York Theater Ballet gives these excellent pieces a home. Here’s hoping the company finds one for itself. 

 

 

 

 



#6 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 07:01 AM

A review of Ballet Memphis in "The Wizard of Oz" by Calvin Wilson in The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

 

On Saturday afternoon at the Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, Ballet Memphis made a persuasive case that even with a different soundtrack, the land of Oz is a fascinating place. More than 1,300 people turned out for the second of three performances presented by Dance St. Louis. With choreography by Steven McMahon, the ballet stuck to the familiar story of Dorothy, a Kansas girl who gets caught up in a tornado and transported to a magical land where she meets a Cowardly Lion, a Scarecrow and a Tin Man. Against the backdrop of Robert Andrew Kovach’s simple yet poetic set design, the three companions — with Dorothy’s dog, Toto, hitching a ride in her basket — took to the Yellow Brick Road to seek the Wizard’s help in returning the farm girl to Kansas. 

 

 

 

 




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