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Friday, January 24

9 posts in this topic

An interview with Kaori Nakamura, who plans to retire at the end of this season.

“I’ve had a great, long career,” said Nakamura, between rehearsals last week. “I think it’s time.” Though she’s been fortunate to have had few absences from the stage (most notably, before and after the birth of her daughter Maya, three years ago), she’s beginning to notice that certain roles are becoming more difficult.

“A lot of ballets I can still dance,” she said. “But I don’t want to keep dancing until I look bad.”

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A profile of Liam Scarlett at work with New York City Ballet by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

Peter Martins, the company’s ballet master in chief, said that he had “had an eye” on Mr. Scarlett since the Choreographic Institute. “I was contemplating inviting him back, and suddenly he was in Miami and everywhere, and I thought I had better hurry up,” he said in a telephone interview. “I love to use the orchestra, and I said to him, ‘You are coming to New York City Ballet, you should think big.’ ”

Mr. Scarlett has taken Mr. Martins at his word. The ballet has three principal couples, a lone principal man and a corps de ballet of 10. Unusually, Mr. Scarlett is rehearsing two full casts, because, he said, there were so many dancers that he wanted to work with.

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A story on changes at Orlando Ballet by Michael W. Freeman in the Journal-Sentinel.

Taborrak said the Orlando Ballet was also lucky that when they had to leave the OUC building, a list of local businesses agreed to help them remodel the new building to meet the needs of a ballet school, all done free of charge.

“We’ve been lucky,” she said. “The building next door, the new home for the Orlando Ballet School, was completely redone, and that work was done pro bono. These companies stepped up and gave us huge service with all kinds of construction work. The move would have been tragic for us financially if people didn’t step up.”

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A review of Louisville Ballet by Kathi E.B. Ellis for NPR station WFPL.

In an attempt to compensate for the bitter cold outside, the studio was decidedly toasty for this year's salute to company choreographers, which will be the final showcase under artistic director Bruce Simpson, who retires at the end of this season. This program has grown in scope under Simpson’s leadership. It is now a regular part of the season – and a popular part, if the number of people who braved subzero temperatures is a testament – and has the support of the costuming department, who are to be applauded for bringing so many different looks to these seventeen dances so soon after the complex costuming needs of The Nutcracker. It is to be hoped that as the board seeks a successor to Simpson, they will seek a leader who will also embrace the energy and importance of growing a future generation of choreographers.

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A review of BalletNext by Marianne Adams for danceviewtimes.

Both daring and self-contained, BalletNext’s presentation of An Evening by Brian Reeder was an intriguing visual delight that left just enough unsaid. The program featured three works choreographed by Reeder: the New York premiere of “Different Homes,” the world premiere of “Surmisable Units,” and an older work, “Picnic,” from 2012. All three were performed to live music and offered a creative depth that came from a keen exploitation of minimalism, proving that less can indeed be more.

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A review of the Bolshoi and NYCB in "Jewels" by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

In both Moscow and New York, "Rubies" now suffers from the bizarre notion that the lead female character is a gum-cracking ingénue. Ekaterina Krysanova is elastic and powerful, but as things stand, Bolshoi soloist Ekaterina Shipulina dominates "Rubies" with her cleverness and energy.

Olga Smirnova gives a stagey but moving account of "Diamonds." She turns to face her heroic partner, Semyon Chudin, as if startled out of a reverie, and then leads him with an arrow-like gesture into the empyrean.

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A preview of upcoming dance events by Rebecca Ritzel in The Washington Post.

There are many ways you can measure the high-water mark of modern dance, but one method might be to pinpoint the moment at which its European predecessor, ballet, started inviting the distinctly American artform into the highbrow fold.

If you can settle on when that moment was.

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A new documentary focusing on dancers and their injuries will have its premiere at the Prix de Lausanne.

But Britain will be contributing in another way. As part of the programme of events surrounding the competition, Patrick Rump: Sports Scientist, a remarkable new short documentary film produced by Angela Bernstein and Nigel Wattis, will be screened for the first time.

It focuses on the work of the titular character – a staggeringly handsome young German with a background in martial arts, who has pioneered radically new programmes for rehabilitating injured dancers which also improve performance, endurance and technique.

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Judith Mackrell reprints selected reader comments in her blog.

The first week of Resolution!, by contrast, elicited thoughts on the internal logic of choreography, the nuts and bolts of dance.

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