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Tuesday, January 21


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10 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:42 AM

Mikhail Baryshnikov performs "Man in a Case" at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre.
 

 

A veteran of the spotlight, he also craves the high-wire act of live performance.

 

"I love it because it scares me. Every time I step onstage, I get the same empty stomach, the same butterflies. You have to live up to the material, to do it justice."

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:44 AM

Janos Gereben corresponds with Shinji Eshima in Moscow.

 

From the note, it appears the Joffrey Ballet is taking on RAkU, Yuri Possokhov's ballet for which Eshima composed the score. Premiered in 2011 by the San Francisco Ballet, and reprised the next year, the work is certain to be produced by other companies as well.

 

Right now, Eshima must be approaching the West Coast, ready to land in time for the S.F. Ballet's Wednesday gala.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:45 AM

A review of the Finnish National Ballet by Gerald Dowler in The Financial Times.

 

The Four Temperaments remains one of George Balanchine’s most satisfying ballets and sees the choreographer experiment with new shapes, movements and poses, pushing against the boundaries of classical dance; now almost 70 years old, it remains fresh and quixotic and a serious test for any troupe. This was a confident performance by the company, carefully danced and true to the spirit of the work, but it lacked the mordant attack of the finest interpretations. The dancers were at their best in the gentler, more enigmatic episodes – Ilja Bolotov a fine-hewed Melancholic and each of the three introductory Themes outlined with care. And it was a performance with real bite of Hindemith’s eponymous composition by the Ooppera orchestra under Ollitapio Lehtinen.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:47 AM

A look at the musical selections for San Francisco Ballet's season.

 

West singles out "the Shostakovich 'tryptich' — three exceptional pieces of Shostakovich to show off the different styles of his art. For Stravinsky, both Firebird and Rite of Spring in the same season — is an impressive amount for the orchestra play. Rite of Spring calls for the largest orchestra ever assembled by the ballet.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:49 AM

Sophia Lee's hometown paper notes her casting as  Juliet.

 

Sophia Lee, a rising star with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet — who lived and trained in Langley (at the Cameron Academy of Classical Dance) — will dance the role of Juliet, as the famed Canadian dance company brings an enduring tale of love, longing and loss to the Queen Elizabeth Theatre, with choreographer Rudi van Dantzig’s exquisite classical ballet Romeo and Juliet, running from Jan. 30 to Feb. 1.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:50 AM

Will Tuckett makes a new piece for the Sarasota Ballet.

 

Taking his cue from the music (from which he also drew the ballet's title), a multi-layered canon that is both melodic and moody, Tuckett used as his starting point the fact that 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of Europe's entry into World War I. He was reluctant to attribute any narrative element or even specific characters to the abstract work, but rather portrayed it as a reflective musing on what was to have been "the war to end all wars" and tribute to "all the anonymous fallen soldiers."

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:51 AM

Travel plans for Houston Ballet II and the Houston Ballet Academy.

 

From February 15 – 23, 2014, four students from Houston Ballet Academy have been invited to Dresden, Germany to participate in the prestigious German dance education conference “Fourth Dance Education Biennale 2014 Dresden,” which this year will focus on “Education Profession – The Creative Process.” From February 15 to 23, more than 150 participants – students, lecturers and teachers – will address to this topic in workshops, performances and a symposium.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:53 AM

A review of Cape Town City Ballet by Beverley Brommert in Tonight.

 

Staged under a summer sky in the leafy intimacy of Maynard-ville’s al fresco theatre, CTCB’s first offering of the year (the 80th year of its existence) is a winner.

 

With no plot to distract from the dancing, technical demands made on executants of Les Sylphides are considerable, and the artists of CTCB exhibit not only the requisite stamina, but also the discipline and precision that make this ultimate “ballet blanc” a visual delight.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 10:54 AM

The National Ballet of China celebrates the fiftieth anniversary  of "The Red Detachment of Women" with a tour.

 

The new tour will see 50 performances, apt considering it marks the 50th anniversary of the piece. The tour will take the company to various cities around the country, before it comes back to the capital for the last performance at the Great Hall of the People.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 03:31 PM

A review of Whim W'Him by Charlotte Hart for Seattle Dances.

 

The program ended on a lighter note, with Wevers’ Les Sylphides serving as the evening’s sitcom offering. Set to the Chopin score from the early 20th century ballet of the same name, Les Sylphides revolved around an intimate dinner party for seven, each guest a stock character from comedy: the flirtatious host and her weak spouse, the drunk couple, the host’s love interest and his mostly unsuspecting wife, and the unwelcome “friend.” Clever use of a long table as the sole set piece (as table, walls, and door) completed the scene.

 

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 06:19 PM

Richard Kaye remembers David Daniel , among others, in The New York Review of Books' blog.

 

.......Or else he would phone me very late at night and tell me, between drags on his cigarette, about his day scraping together an income with various magazines but also about the world. It usually involved some of the celebrated people in his life—particularly three women, “Suzanne,” “Arlene,” “Pauline,” an imposing cultural law firm of abbreviated assonance. David was not only a lover of ballet but also a serious-minded critic of dance, although one with a serious writer’s block and some legendary setbacks. He once explained to me that he had completed a manuscript, a biographical/critical account of the ballerina Suzanne Farrell that had been under contract, but he had left it in a taxi. He was never able to retrieve it and he had no copy.  

 

 




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