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Wednesday, December 25


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#1 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:23 PM

A follow-up story on Clara Bergs, the little girl whose ballet dancing caught on video caused a YouTube sensation.

 

Unbeknownst to the family, Clara had taught herself every step of large sections of the ballet, after hours spent watching it on DVD. When the video was posted online last fall, it was picked up by media in Taiwan, Australia, the United States and Great Britain.

 

Given her physical and mental challenges, Clara’s musicality and memorization skills were an inspiration. In addition to autism, Clara also has a genetic disorder known as DiGeorge syndrome, which can affect learning and cause facial deformity. Together, the diseases inhibit her comprehension, movement and speech.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:26 PM

An interview with Tetsuya Kumakawa by Kris Kosaka in The Japan Times.

 

Since returning to Japan from the Royal Ballet in 1999 to start his K-Ballet company in Tokyo, Hokkaido-born Kumakawa has industriously expanded his artistic domain. With five ballet schools across the nation, from Yokohama to Fukuoka, his realm extends into adult classes in dance and a company named Body Alignment U-Be that features massage and wellness services.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:27 PM

Nevada Ballet Theatre photo gallery.

 

Nevada Ballet Theatre made the magic come alive for a second year at The Smith Center during a 10-performance run. The company is shown here during dress rehearsals at Reynolds Hall.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:28 PM

An interview with Carlos Acosta.

 

“Oh Romeo, Romeo... what a great ballet. And Natalia is very refreshing to dance with. She has a lot of passion,” he grins. “I might have finally been tamed!”

Off stage, the dancer who once had a reputation for enjoying himself behind the scenes has also finally been called to heel, and lives in London with his fiancée, Charlotte, and daughter, Aila, who is nearly two. So, on Christmas Day, will they be watching his perform-ance in the Royal Ballet’s Don Quixote from earlier this year, which he also choreographed?

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:40 PM

A TV interview with Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre costumier Janet Groom. Video.

 

“The partners have to move in close to principal dancers and the tutu has to collapse when then when he moves away, it has to go right back where it was before,” Groom said.

Many of the costumes are worn by several different dancers over the 24 performances, so they’re made with extra hooks and elastic. And some costumes are harder to dance in.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:43 PM

Armenian ballet dancer Ludwig Ispiriyan is granted Israeli citizenship.

 

Vestnik Kavkaza found out that the dancer requested citizenship for the first time several years ago, when he married Israeli ballerina Shani Perez

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:49 PM

National Public Radio recycles a story about E.T.A. Hoffmann. Audio and text.

 

SIEGEL: In the 1980s, the Pacific Northwest Ballet wanted to return to the Hoffmann version. They asked an illustrator and writer who was famous for his own dark voyages with childhood demons to take a look. Maurice Sendak, who created "Where the Wild Things Are."

 

MAURICE SENDAK: So when I did read it, I became very interested, 'cause it was a very bizarre story, is a very bizarre story and that, of course, would appeal to me. It meant something. I mean, it had bite and muscle the way the Grimm fairy tales do. So I thought, if we could put up on the stage in Seattle, anything approximating Hoffmann - without diluting or bashing Tchaikovsky - then perhaps we would have something that was interesting.

 




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