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Tuesday, December 3


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#1 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:42 AM

Pavel Dmitrichenko gets six years.

 

The Voice of Russia

 

Moscow's Meshchansky Court has sentenced Bolshoi Theatre ballet dancer Pavel Dmitrichenko to six years in prison for organizing an attack on Bolshoi choreographer, Sergei Filin.

Dmitrichenko will serve his term in a high-security prison. Driver Andrei Lipatov, charged with complicity in the attack, will spend four years in a high-security prison. Yury Zarutsky, who actually attacked Filin with acid, will go to a high-security prison for ten years, according to the sentence, read out by Judge Yelena Maximova.

 

 

 

Associated Press

 

 

Lawyers said they would appeal.

In his testimony, Filin called Dmitrichenko a volatile and threatening employee who was always stirring up trouble, but stopped short of accusing him of plotting the attack.

 

 

Irish Independent

 

The dancer pleaded not guilty but has admitted "moral responsibility" because he spoke badly of Mr Filin in front of Zarutsky. Dmitrichenko had claimed he was passed over for the best parts in the theatre.

"I didn't know about what was going to happen to you," Dmitrichenko told Mr Filin during a court session in November. "I still don't relieve myself of moral responsibility."

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:45 AM

More.

 

The New York Times

 

During the trial, Mr. Dmitrichenko has seemed hardly to step off the Bolshoi stage, where he was best known for playing villains like Ivan the Terrible, as he has stood, seemingly bemused, behind the metal bars of the defendant’s cage in court.

As the guilty verdict was read on Tuesday, he nodded, looked down and then licked his lips nervously.

 

 

The Independent

 

Judge Yelena Maksimova found Pavel Dmitrichenko guilty of conspiring to cause grievous bodily harm to artistic director Sergei Filin because the dancer “was unhappy with the way Filin allocated roles and bonuses to dancers.” Although the charge carries a maximum of 12 years, state prosecutors had sought nine years for Dmitrichenko, who is best known for his portrayal of villains in Swan Lake and Ivan the Terrible.

 

 

The Los Angeles Times

 

It remains unclear whether any of the defendents will appeal Tuesday's verdicts. The case has exposed in-fighting and favoritism in the Bolshoi, damaging the company's international reputation.

 


 



#3 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:46 AM

Vassily Sinaisky  explains his resignation.

 

"Now, the new general manager – Mr. Urin – is a completely different person. And of course, his four months have shown me that we have very-very different opinions about many-many musical things. He could organize the process, I hope so."

"But he wasn’t understandable for me in his actions concerning music, our future, repertoire and so on. I felt a gap between us more and more and I didn’t want there to be a real conflict. So, I decided to leave the theatre," Mr. Sinaisky explained.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:49 AM

A BBC News story on the recent tribulations of the Bolshoi Ballet.

 

"This is normal, theatre is not a cathedral," says Vladimir Kotykhov, deputy editor of Ballet magazine.

But the extent of the conflict at the Bolshoi took him by surprise: "It was always the scene of conflicts, but for an attack like this to happen, it probably means that the times and morals of the entire country are changing," he said.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:51 AM

A review of the Boston Ballet's Nutcracker by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe.

 

At times it’s almost too adult. The Red Cross stretcher is gone from the battle scene; so is the baby mice’s parody of the Dance of the Cygnets in “Swan Lake,” and the owl clock from which Drosselmeier used to emerge. Some ideas work, like having Clara’s parents give her toe shoes rather than a doll, and having her use the nutcracker to shell nuts for her guests. Some are puzzling: Fritz seems way too old to be getting a floppy stuffed bunny, which he hates. (The bunny, grown to life size, does turn up in the battle scene to rescue a gingerbread man, but he looks out of place there, too.) And the balloon in which Clara and the Nutcracker Prince arrive in his kingdom has become a unattractively dark snow cloud.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:56 AM

A preview of Alabama Ballet's Nutcracker.

 

As with most ballet companies from Moscow to New York, Alabama Ballet's production of "The Nutcracker" is the season highlight, the professional company's top revenue generator and biggest attendance draw. But what makes this production unique is the company's relationship to the George Balanchine Trust in New York.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:13 PM

A review of LakeCities Ballet Theatre's Nutcracker by Cheryl Callon for TheaterJones.

 

Act Two reveals the headlining guest stars from American Ballet Theatre, Julie Kent and Sascha Radetsky as the Sugar Plum Fairy and her cavalier, respectively. Kent returns for her 15th and final Nutcracker with LBT. It’s a shame she’ll no longer be dancing the role of the Sugar Plum Fairy for the company. She’s absolutely stunning to watch. Her years as an ABT principal have refined her technique to an exquisite peak. While she may not reach for the highest attitudes or spine-breaking arabesques, her mature movement quality truly makes the art form look effortless. Radetsky, as usual, excites with his gravity-defying leaps. 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:14 PM

Martha Clarke writes about her new piece, an adaptation of Colette's Cheri.

 

I was fortunate to reacquaint myself with ballerina Alessandra Ferri two years ago.....Alessandra and I had a conversation after a performance of Angel Reapers, my collaboration with Alfred Uhry, at the Joyce Theater. She had not appeared in New York for seven years, and she said to me, “I’m ready for you.” At about the same time I was in rehearsal at American Ballet Theatre. As I was leaving I peeked into a studio and saw Herman Cornejo, a dancer I had never seen before. I was utterly dumbstruck by his presence and introduced myself—it really was love at first sight. His spirit and beauty completely mesmerized me. As I was walking to the theater one evening shortly thereafter, I came up with the idea of Cheri for Alessandra and Herman.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:35 PM

A story on Wayne McGregor's staging of "Chroma" for the Ailey company by Siobhan Burke in The New York Times.

 

Mr. McGregor, 43, had similar questions. He has staged “Chroma” for a host of prestigious ballet companies but never, until now, a modern-dance troupe. After working with classically trained dancers, Mr. McGregor was drawn to the Ailey company’s “different range of physical histories,” he said. “There’s something about the dancers, a kind of raw physicality, that you don’t get in many places around the world.”

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:35 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet's Nutcracker by Philippa Kiraly for The SunBreak.

 

This is the first time I’ve seen Dec, a company soloist, in the lead role, and she more than rose to the occasion. She phrased her movements to mirror the music, each one gracefully carried through with her arms and body, and as though she had all the time in the world to execute it. Her balance was firm, she was light as a feather on her feet, and she gave character to her role. Lee-Yin was an able partner: supportive when needed, but good in his solo moments, also.

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 04:29 PM

Another review of PNB by Sandra Kurtz for Seattle Weekly.

 

Yet in the best tradition of fairy tales and Hollywood musicals, ticket presales were strong, the show was a hit, and PNB has been hip-deep in the Stowell/Sendak production ever since.

Theirs was a very specific vision for Nutcracker: Unlike so many productions that borrow here and there from other sources, PNB’s has a unique and distinct style, going back to the original E.T.A. Hoffmann story—as spooky as it is sweet—for a scenario that puts young heroine Clara at the cusp of adulthood.....

 




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