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Monday, December 2


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#1 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:23 PM

An interview with Amy Wolfe of Manassas Ballet Theatre.

 

In creating “Colin: The Ballet,” Amy Wolfe choreographed a work to celebrate her son’s short life in dance. A collaboration with composer Mark Menza, the four-part ballet debuted in March and has been performed four times, including once in Bakersfield, Calif.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:26 PM

Ballet Apetrei presents its Nutcracker.

 

As St. Tammany’s own resident ballet company, their nonprofit organization has presented numerous seasonal ballets over the years, including excerpts from “Giselle,” “Raymonda,” and Constantin’s original ballet, “Edward Scissorhands.” The later premiered in 1998 and was performed in July to honor of this year’s 25th anniversary of the company and the Apetrei Dancenter, which begins training dancers at age 3.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:28 PM

A review of the Ballet Boyz by Eric Karoulla for The Skinny.

 

Part one, choreographed by Liam Scarlett, is called Serpent. True to its name, it involves fluid, slithering movements, accompanied by music by Max Richter. Nonetheless, aside from a few repetitions that become tiresome and the occasional lack of timing as an ensemble, Scarlett's choice of not portraying the all-male dance troupe as a brutal mob but rather giving them a sensual, fluid - at times almost sexual - aesthetic is an interesting one. Admittedly however, the dancers' partial nudity felt superfluous and did not add anything to the dancing.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:32 PM

Heather Ogden appears in a new short film. Video included.

 

Starring Richmond's own Heather Ogden (who is now a principal dancer with The National Ballet of Canada), "Lost In Motion II" is the sequel to Shirinian's successful 2012 film "Lost In Motion."

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:33 PM

A preview of Alabama Dance Academy's Nutcracker and related events by Michael Huebner in The Birmingham News.

 

Dancers from Alabama Dance Academy have already been making the rounds in preparation for its annual production of "The Nutcracker." Based in Hoover, ADA has three large studios where a variety of styles from ballet to pilates are taught by a faculty of six, each with an extensive dance background. Founder Pamela Merkel trained at the Royal Ballet Centre and School of American Ballet, danced with State of Alabama Ballet and several companies on the east coast, and has taught at Alabama School of Fine Arts.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:36 PM

An item on this week's episode of "city.ballet," "Principals," with link.

 

In this week's episode of city.ballet, the talented dancers of the New York City Ballet explore the physical and mental battles they are forced to endure to obtain the highly coveted roles they so long for. As expected, things get intense.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:44 PM

The Bolshoi loses its music director and leading conductor.

 

The New York Times

 

Vassily Sinaisky, a graduate of the Leningrad Conservatory who has headed the Bolshoi’s music program since 2010, resigned after speaking privately with the theater’s director, Vladimir Urin, on Monday, said Katerina Novikova, the press secretary for the Bolshoi Theater. In an interview with a the state-run RIA Novosti news service, Mr. Urin did not say why Mr. Sinaisky left, but it was suggested that he was being courted by the St. Petersburg State Symphony Orchestra, which short-listed Mr. Sinaisky for a position as musical director in October.

 

 

RIA Novosti

 

Urin did not elaborate on the reason for the resignation, but said it came two weeks before the expected first night of an opera in which Sinaisky was both the musical director and the conductor.

 

AFP

 

Sinaisky's abrupt departure comes as a surprise. Only recently he enthusiastically talked about the theatre's production plans, and in October, he conducted the premiere of Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman" to mostly positive reviews.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:44 PM

Bolshoi dancers and staff make a plea for Pavel Dmitrichenko.

"In the open trial, the public has heard absolutely no evidence confirming his guilt," dozens of performers and other staff at the Bolshoi said in an open letter published on the website of the daily Izvestia newspaper.

 

Dancer Natalya Vyskubenko said it was signed by about 150 people.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:48 PM

A listing of local dance offerings from TimeOut Chicago.

 

With designs that suggest a pop-up book come to life and choreography that honors both the narrative and Tchaikovsky's score, Robert Joffrey's 1987 Nutcracker (with contributions by Gerald Arpino) is among the country's best versions of the holiday ballet. The Chicago Sinfonietta provides live accompaniment, along with a children's choir, which performs in the lobby before curtain and during the intermission.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:49 PM

Three Joffrey dancers chat about the holiday season.

 

Favorite holiday tradition:
Erica:
"[My friend] Carrie and I exchange advent Christmas gifts, so we get to open a gift everyday from Dec. 1 through Christmas Day."
Shane: "I celebrate Christmas and my father's birthday at the same time."
Amber: "The Joffrey has a Christmas Eve matinee and every year since I joined the company, my mother has driven to Chicago Christmas Eve morning to take me home after for Christmas with my family."

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:51 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet's Nutcracker by Moira Macdonald in The Seattle Times.

 

The PNB company dancers, generously augmented by PNB Professional Division students, acquitted themselves with grace and poise, but it’s the children on stage that draw your gaze. After 30 years, surely some of those original party guests and small servants were in the audience, perhaps with children of their own, perhaps remembering a brightly lit stage and a beautiful costume, perhaps still dreaming a “Nutcracker” dream.

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:33 AM

A review of Maine State Ballet's Nutcracker by Jennifer Brewer in The Portland Press Herald.

 

As the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Cavalier, Janet Davis and Glenn Davis performed the pas de deux with their usual precision and panache. Glenn Davis’ leaps and turns showed great elasticity and sustain. Janet Davis, in a luscious new rose-pink tutu, was gracious and delicate, with fabulous balances and turns. Their well-matched lines, smooth partnering and musical understanding were on display in the lovely adagio.

 

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 10:58 AM

A report from the front line of New York City Ballet's Nutcracker by James Wolcott in his blog.

 

I thought Robert La Fosse was a bit too preeny as Drosselmeier, showing off his fine leg extension as if wanting to hit the elevator button with his toe, but Megan Fairchild, as Sugarplum Fairy, began as a bon-bon and ballerina'd her way into swelling vibrancy in the second half. The New York Times reviewer complained that Fairchild's "customary caution remained a hindrance; when the music expanded, she didn’t." I am unacquainted with Fairchild's customary caution, whatever that might be, but the criticism that comes after the semi-colon strikes me as completely, totally, 100 % Bizarro-world wrong. Expanding with the music, taking bodily possession of it, is exactly what she did Friday night. ....

 

 



#14 Alexandra

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 05:09 PM

Ilona Landgraf posted a new review on her danceviewtimes blog of Ballet Zurich's new "Woyzeck."

 

http://danceviewtime...ilona_landgraf/

 

“Woyzeck” is Christian Spuck's second work of choreography based on a piece by the German writer Georg Büchner. In 2008 Spuck already had staged the comedy “Leonce and Lena”, two years later the gloomy “Woyzeck” pre­mie­red in Oslo. Formerly re­si­dent cho­re­o­gra­pher of Stuttgart Ballet and since 2012 artistic director of Ballet Zurich, Spuck literally brought “Woyzeck” home. Büchner, who died well ahead his time in 1837 at the age of twenty-three due to a typhus infection, spent his last month in Zurich and moreover was buried there. Yet “Woyzeck”, the last piece of his small oeuvre, couldn't be finished. The handwritten fragments later were assembled and underwent several edits.


#15 dirac

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 03:25 PM

A review of the Australian Ballet's Cinderella by Jill Sykes in The Sydney Morning Herald.

 

Intriguingly, there were plenty of opportunities. Not only because the company was dancing with tremendous verve and precision worthy of applause, but also because New York's Russian-born Alexei Ratmansky often choreographs in bite-size chunks with a strong ''da-dah'' finish. These are shaped and delivered for easy consumption, like numbers in a musical, and they get an immediate response.

 

Fair enough, if that's his style. But in a three-act ballet they make a bitty and monotonously predictable alternative to a coherent structure.

 




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