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Sunday, December 1


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#1 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:23 AM

Alastair Macaulay reviews ENB in Le Corsaire:

 

http://mobile.nytime....html?from=arts

 

This staging, while no more Byronic than any of the four others I have seen, is actually the least irksome. One reason is that Anna-Marie Holmes — who has staged it and who is also responsible for American Ballet Theater’s current production and the one before that — has gone on improving the tone of its comedy. There is no jokey depiction of Muslims at prayer; and the big “Jardin Animé” dancing-flowers divertissement is effectively staged as the opium-induced fantasy of the Pasha, who, though aged, is a devotee of female pulchritude.

 

 



#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:27 AM

Brian Seibert reviews NYCB in Nutcracker for the New York Times:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...acker.html?_r=0

 

Rapt attention is what this “Nutcracker” tends to inspire among children in the audience, too, including the children who have grown into adults. Of course, it’s not just the tree that draws viewers in. There’s the detail-rich party scene, the battle with the mice, the journey by bed, the snowstorm, and then all the dancing in the Land of Sweets. And, oh yes, Tchaikovsky’s magical score.

 



#3 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:30 AM

Ballet as training for starting a business:

 

http://www.crainsnew...LLBIZ/312019967#

 

After winning her first ballet contract with the Joffrey Ballet at age 9, Allison Patel was dancing professionally in dance troupes and Off-Broadway shows by her early 20s. But that meant financial struggle. "My first year I netted $20,000," said Ms. Patel. "Given that $11,000 of that went to rent, how did I survive?"

 



#4 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:33 AM

A new clinic for dance injuries has opened in Birmingham:

 

http://www.birmingha...ospital-6359081

Research has shown 80 per cent of professional dancers suffer an injury that stops them working each year, so fast, affordable, specialist healthcare is critical to keeping dancers in employment.

 

The new specialist service, which has cost around £140,000 to set up, will be based at the NHS’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham.

 



#5 Alexandra

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 07:26 PM

Review of the Joffrey Ballet's "Nutcracker" by Alexandra Tomalonis on danceviewtimes:

 

http://www.danceview...tmas-treat.html

 

 

As a holiday family treat, the Joffrey’s “Nutcracker” is a good show. But if one looks at it as a classical ballet (and the first production was created for the Mariinsky at the end of the 19th century) it falls a bit short. The dancing in the snow scene and Kingdom of the Sweets divertissements is an interesting case study of what happens when today’s dancers, chosen for and accustomed to dancing so much contemporary work, have to tackle a classical piece. These dancers can perform the steps — the Nutcracker Prince (Dylan Gutierrez) landed consistently clean fifth positions and was a supportive partner — but torsos and shoulders weren’t always engaged in the dancing. The cavaliers were rather wooden, as though correct posture was a metaphor for nobility. April Daly, as the Sugar Plum Fairy, had beautifully clean pirouettes, yet did not dominate her Kingdom as a ballerina would. One has the sense that classical ballet is not these dancers’ native language, but something put on, like party clothes, for special occasions.



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