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Dmitrichenko, Zarutsky, Lipatov Trial


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#61 puppytreats

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 09:32 AM

Is this broadcast on TV?



#62 volcanohunter

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 09:40 AM

No. No cameras in court for this trial.

#63 volcanohunter

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 10:45 AM

Here is RAPSI's running coverage in English of today's proceedings, including the first half of Pavel Dmitrichenko's testimony. RAPSI promises similar coverage of Nikolai Tsiskaridze's testimony on Monday.

http://www.rapsinews.../269754563.html



#64 volcanohunter

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 09:29 AM

It's not all that easy to follow, but this is an English-language log of today's testimony by Pavel Dmitrichenko, Nikolai Tsiskaridze, Andrei Uvarov and Anzhelina Vorontsova.

http://www.rapsinews.../269787308.html



#65 Helene

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 11:57 PM

Ismene Brown has posted translations of the Russian version of the feed from the last two days to her blog:

Trial day 10: Dmitrichenko questioned, Tsiskaridze, Vorontsova testify

Trial day 9: Dmitrichenko testifies

#66 Helene

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 11:23 AM

According to Ismene Brown's blog entry with commentary and a translation of an article in ITAR-TASS, noticeably not Izvetsia, senior coach Maria Kondratieva and group of dancers want to testify to rebut Tsiskaridze's characterization of Filin on behalf of themselves and other Bolshoi dancers. The group includes Obraztsova, Smirnova, Rebetskaya, Lantratov, Ovcharenko, and Medvedev.

http://www.ismeneb.c...e_in_court.html

#67 Stecyk

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 11:53 AM

According to Ismene Brown's blog entry with commentary and a translation of an article in ITAR-TASS, noticeably not Izvetsia, senior coach Maria Kondratieva and group of dancers want to testify to rebut Tsiskaridze's characterization of Filin on behalf of themselves and other Bolshoi dancers. The group includes Obraztsova, Smirnova, Rebetskaya, Lantratov, Ovcharenko, and Medvedev.

http://www.ismeneb.c...e_in_court.html

 

 

http://www.ismeneb.c...e_in_court.html

 

Helene's link didn't work for me. I am posting a slight modified link above. Perhaps the blog changed its link afterward.

 

Mods, if desired, please feel free to update Helene's link and delete my post.



#68 volcanohunter

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 12:22 PM

Olga Smirnova is already on the list of witnesses scheduled to appear. Initially the prosecutor had asked the court to accept her written testimony since she and half the troupe were in Singapore last week performing Swan Lake, but Dmitrichenko insisted that she appear in person, and the judge denied the prosecution's motion.

 

The prosecutor asked the judge to allow the testimony of Bolshoi Theater leading soloist Olga Smirnova to be read aloud, because "she cannot personally appear in court due to being on tour in Singapore from November 17 to 26."

Lawyers for the victim said they supported the petition because "the law allows for the reading of testimony of witnesses who are traveling."

Dmitrichenko protested against the initiative, noting that Smirnova is "a witness to the events of January 17, having spent the evening with Sergei Filin."

The leading soloist was supported by defense lawyers, who noted that Article 281 of the Criminal-Procedural Code of the Russian Federation contains an exhaustive list of circumstances under which testimony may be read aloud. But Olga Smirnova is "on a business trip, alive and well, and will arrive soon."

Judge Maksimova ultimately rejected the prosecutor's motion.

http://izvestia.ru/news/561004



#69 Helene

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 12:28 PM

There seems to be a difference between witnesses brought forth by Filin's lawyers and the prosecutor. Smirnova was being summoned by the prosecutor, and I wonder if she has to be listed as Filin's witness to be able to testify to Filin's character, due to the monetary damage part of the trial.

#70 volcanohunter

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 12:34 PM

The prosecutors and Filin's attorneys appeared to agree on the Smirnova motion. Neither side seemed to want her there in person. But the court decided she must appear, so she will be able to use the occasion to rebut Tsiskaridze's testimony, as well as to relate what she knows of the events of January 17. She will also have to answer Dmitrichenko's inevitable questions about how often Filin used to drive her home at night.



#71 Turandot

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 05:35 PM

Forgive me if this question has been addressed elsewhere in related threads. But my question is this, why was it considered okay for Bolshoi Ballet dancers to not attend regular class? In the links above, Dmitrichenko rebelled against Filin making class attendance a must. For those who do not attend, Mr. Filin wished to impose fines. Dmitrichenko was particularly incensed about this rule. I thought major companies such as NYCB and others all have stipulations about class attendance, mandatory and what is excusable, spelled out in contracts. I am very surprised that a company like the Bolshoi did not have such requirement. If dancers there were used to such laxity, no wonder many supported Mr. Dmitrichenko fighting for their so-called rights.

#72 Jayne

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 08:15 PM

When you look at that youtube video of Christopher Wheeldon choreographing at the Bolshoi, and the "excuses" that Tsiskaridze came up with to miss choreography sessions (the choreo was making him unwell) then you can begin to understand Filin's predicament.  



#73 volcanohunter

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 08:20 PM

I would not make generalizatons based on Tsiskaridze's behavior. What is pretty obvious from that documentary is that the other dancers in the production did not act that way.

#74 Jayne

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 08:23 PM

Per the Ismene Brown article:  

 

Tsiskaridze also commented that Filin 'would do anything for publicity'

 

jawdrop.gif



#75 Helene

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 09:32 PM

Dancers weren't contractually required to go to Company Class in Balanchine's time. However, he mostly made decisions about dancers when they were right in front of them, even going so far as to have an optional Monday class on the dancers' day off for a while that was legendary to those who went. (Farrell and Ashley wrote about it in their books.) It was not considered a career move to skip class when Balanchine gave it.

Villella and some of the dancers when they were older wrote that they could no longer do Balanchine's class physically later in their careers and stopped taking class. Villella's description in "Prodigal Son" of having to crawl into the bathroom to soak in the bathtub and then having a very long massage in the morning so he could stand upright and walk was frightening.

Stephen Manes wrote in "Where Snowflakes Dance and Swear" that there were classes that were essentially auditions for stagers and choreographers. These weren't announced, and dancers lost and gained parts by the impression they made, sometimes unknowingly.


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