Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Dmitrichenko, Zarutsky, Lipatov Trial


  • Please log in to reply
120 replies to this topic

#16 solo

solo

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts

Posted 06 November 2013 - 05:05 PM

RAPSI broadcasts Filin’s acid attack testimony live:

http://www.rapsinews.../269522223.html

I am puzzled with this phrase, which exists in Russian version but is missing in the English version:

“17:35 On the whole, dear friends, we are short of words to make at least some sort of evaluation of what we hear at the Meshchansky Court today. Make sense of it just as you like.”

#17 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 06 November 2013 - 05:10 PM

It is also possible that he was so happy to be alive right after the attack that he said this after being visited by a priest and realizing that he'd survive.

The newspaper quoted him at the time as saying that God would judge him.

#18 Alayna

Alayna

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts

Posted 09 November 2013 - 08:38 AM

Quoted from the Guardian's report on Filin's testimony:

 

 

Filin described Dmitrichenko's allegations that he slept with several ballerinas as an "absolute lie", and said the idea that "roles were handed out through my bedsheets" was nonsense. "I never had any intimate relations with any of these women. I want to repeat that I find it an insult to me and to these women because nothing of the sort ever happened."

 

http://www.theguardi...ck-dancer-trial

 

I take that to mean that he denies sleeping with ballerinas - period. Not that he might have been sleeping with them but just didn't promote them because of it.

 

What purpose did that line of questioning serve?  Even if Dmitrichenko can prove that everything he accuses Filin of is true, is that supposed to justify the acid attack?  Who's the one on trial here - Dmitrichenko or Filin?



#19 Amy Reusch

Amy Reusch

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,795 posts

Posted 09 November 2013 - 07:48 PM

Perhaps both are on trial... and more than just Dmitrichenko & Filin.... there always seems to yet another scandal unfolding..... everytime we take another look something else crawls out. Is it all lies on one side amd all truth on the other? Seems overly simplistic. Hopefully Mercutio isn't dying somewhere.

#20 Alayna

Alayna

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:49 AM

Shaun Walker, the Moscow correspondent for The Guardian, has been covering the trial and he tweeted:

 

"Weird thing about Bolshoi trial is that questioning more about whether Filin *deserved* to be attacked than on whether Dmitrichenko did it"

 

Whether or not Filin is guilty of anything that Dmitrichenko has accused him of, he's already been severely punished.  And it appears to be a life sentence, since his father-in-law testified that doctors told him that Filin will need treatment on his eyes for the rest of his life.



#21 Drew

Drew

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,334 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:26 AM

His father-in-law testifies about what the doctors told him?  Well, I don't know anything about Russian law, but surely it would make more sense to have the Doctors testify and/or submit affidavits from the Doctors in Germany. I wonder if they are doing that as well. I myself  believe Filin's eyesight is permanently and seriously damaged and that a horrible crime has been committed against him--but lots of things about this trial as reported are odd to read about.



#22 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:11 PM

I assume the laws about hearsay, personal knowledge, and the right to confront and cross-examine witnesses are different there.



#23 California

California

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,587 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:33 PM

We got a glimpse of the dysfunctional Russian court system during the Pussy Riot Trial last year. Here's a Russian columnist from the NY Times describing the shameful system (and there is extensive documentation elsewhere of the Russian court system). I can't imagine it's gotten any better in the last year:

http://latitude.blog...-putins-courts/



#24 Alayna

Alayna

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 03:00 PM

Filin's father-in-law was testifying about the impact the attack had had on his family as well as his health when he spoke about being told that Filin would need lifelong treatment for his eyes.  But I assume (and hope) that the prosecution plans to have some of the doctors who've been treating him testify about his medical condition.



#25 Drew

Drew

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,334 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 04:38 PM

Filin's father-in-law was testifying about the impact the attack had had on his family as well as his health when he spoke about being told that Filin would need lifelong treatment for his eyes. 

 

That makes more sense (to me at least...). Though of course (as noted by puppytreats & others) the laws would be quite different in any case.



#26 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:07 PM

We got a glimpse of the dysfunctional Russian court system during the Pussy Riot Trial last year. Here's a Russian columnist from the NY Times describing the shameful system (and there is extensive documentation elsewhere of the Russian court system). I can't imagine it's gotten any better in the last year:

http://latitude.blog...-putins-courts/


Regarding the condition of and treatment in the penal system, see the open letter regarding the Pussy Riot hunger strike.

#27 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,470 posts

Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:12 PM

Update on Day 5 of the trial in Ismene Brown's blog:

 

http://ismeneb.com/B...confession.html

 

Witnesses of the day were:  Filin associate Dilmara Timergazina, who did not take kindly to the accusation that her daughter-in-law, Olga Smirnova, was sleeping with Filin for parts, Vlademire Ageyev, the car park security guard who first encountered Filin after the attack, Filin's building concierge Antonina Proshkina, and Dmitrichenko friend Batyr Annadurdyev, whose testimony and written statements were not always consistent and who seemed to have difficulty testifying [as if he were an articulate actor in a TV script]. 



#28 diane

diane

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 377 posts

Posted 15 November 2013 - 04:02 AM

This is all pretty riveting, and also depressing. 

 

Thank you very much for all those reporting on this here. 

 

-d-



#29 Catherine

Catherine

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 183 posts

Posted 15 November 2013 - 11:47 PM

What relevance does it have to the case to what extent Filin has lost, regained, or will regain his eyesight? The fact that acid was thrown in his face is documented by medical and surgical photos that are available online. In my view, legally speaking, and not legally speaking, it bears no relevance how severe the damage is or was, then or now -- because there IS damage and acid WAS thrown. And it was ordered thrown by someone other than Dmitrichenko. Those are facts. I don't understand the focus (in the courtroom) on that or the focus on whether or not Filin was carrying on a casting couch situation. Unless that is going to determine the amount (in monetary funds) of compensation for his suffering. Other than that I think that line of questioning by the courts/attorneys is a bit irrelevant. Or is that just me?

 

Secondarily, as a journalist, I can tell you that the coverage in certain US papers is decidedly slanted against or for certain pieces of news. As a journalist I've personally been asked by US national papers to find more "dirt" on someone when there was no dirt to be found (and when the someone in question was Russian). I just say that to suggest we should take with a grain of salt whatever is in print by a national paper (US or otherwise). Look at the source and look at what their typical political views are in most articles on said topic, and then seek out a paper with the opposite views and you will likely find the facts in order to piece together the story.



#30 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 16 November 2013 - 07:47 AM

Nothing justifies throwing acid in Sergei Filin's face or causing him pain and suffering.   From a legal standpoint, I can think of a range of reasons why a trial might involve different types of testimony and evidence on the issues you raise.

 

The degree of injury could be relevant for a number of reasons.  If one needs multiple operations and continuing care, that could cost more money and require payment to cover larger medical costs, cause a longer period of time out of work with more lost wages, and generate greater pain and suffering.  In criminal cases, the degree of injury may affect the degree of a crime.  By analogy, one could commit petit larceny or grand larceny, depending on the amount in question. 

 

I don't understand the discussion of dancers demanding the right to solo roles in a number of different scenarios discussed here.  I thought the prosecutor or the press had raised it, to show a motive for animosity toward Sergei Filin.  However, it seemed tenuous, unless they are suggesting a Nancy Kerrigan type situation.  If you are asking why the defense would raise it, emotional distress could affect the degree of a crime in America.  If one were to demand sexual favors from a man's wife or girlfriend, I can imagine the husband/boyfriend taking serious offense or wanting to protect his girlfriend and responding physically.  The defendant's emotional state would be at issue, and he would need to show why.

 

I can imagine a number of reasons why one would inquire into Sergei Filin's theatre management and labor negotiation activities.  I will pose a few hypotheticals.  If someone in negotiations at the theatre with a labor leader, hypothetically, threatened a union leader, or his girlfriend or family, and law enforcement is not a reliable source of protection for political or economic/corruption reasons, then one could imagine the union leader asking for protection for himself or his girlfriend from a thug, to give an appearance that one is not to be further threatened, not knowing or intending that the thug would harm anyone or throw concentrated battery acid in his face.   Alternatively, one could imagine the thug might have wanted something from the theatre or its head or its affiliates, and approached the union leader as a way to have an excuse to approach the theatre head.   As another alternative, the thug may even have used the name of the union leader or his girlfriend as a way to get himself to the head of the theatre, wholly unbeknownst to the union leader or his girlfriend.  Under another scenario, one could imagine the union head being introduced to the thug and saying he was scared for his girlfriend, and asking what to do, and then the thug offering to talk to someone, or do something else, and being rejected.  The thug could have proceeded on his own, intending maybe to demand payment for his services thereafter, or attain the benefit of access to the theatre head, regardless.  These all could affect questions of proof of the defendant's mental intent or involvement in any action.

 

One can imagine a range of similar scenarios.  However, I raise them to address the issue of relevance to a trial.   Even the prosecution is asking why, and trying to show intent, as well as knowledge and participation in various actions.  The defense is trying to show a lack of intent, and even lack of knowledge of or involvement in the wrongful action, and why.

 

I can also imagine a lawyer would try to introduce such evidence to counter evidence of the prosecution.  For example, imagine a golden child is injured.  The personal injury attorney or criminal prosecutor will appeal to the jury to see the wrongdoer as evil incarnate, harming a defenseless, perfect, beautiful, innocent child.  This would consciously and subconsciously lead to a greater monetary award or harsher criminal sentence.  However, if the defense attorney shows or insinuates that the victim is not pure, and maybe even provoked a response or left the defendant with no reasonable alternative but to fight, then the jury could consciously and subconsciously be influenced to modify the harsh view of the accused.    

 

Again, I don't know how rules of evidence operate in Russia. 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):