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Bolshoi BabylonBolshoi to let the cameras inside


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#46 sohalia

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Posted 24 December 2015 - 01:56 PM

I would like to say to Sohalia that the dancers who Felin invited to join the Bolshoi as well as the dancers he promoted are all extraordinary.
Extraordinary. And the remark about the quality of their dancing which Maria Allash made in the film made her look pathetic. It was sad

 

Thank you, this is the kind of details that got lost of me so I am glad you mentioned this.

 

Thank you Helene and volcanohunter for all the links. I will definitely read into everything as soon as I can.



#47 Stecyk

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 10:14 AM

TheGuardian.com "'​If the Bolshoi is sick, it’s because Russia is too': the ballet company's backstage dramas"

 

Follow the link for the complete article.

 

(Apologies, this link was already covered in the links section.)

 

From 2013 to 2014, a small film crew was allowed unprecedented access to the Bolshoi ballet company, partly to tell the story of the shocking acid attack on its artistic director, Sergei Filin, in January 2013, but also to probe the background to that event. Bolshoi Babylon is a stylish fly-on-the-wall account of conditions within the Moscow company, but it’s also a chilling evocation of the larger politics that govern its home theatre. No one who’s seen Nick Read and Mark Franchetti’s film will be surprised to learn that, shortly after its completion, Filin was served notice that his job at the Bolshoi was over.
 
The criminal investigations and internal soul-searching that followed the acid attack opened a can of worms at the Bolshoi – and a few of them are captured on camera. Dancers hostile to Filin talk candidly about their reasons for resenting their director, and discuss chronic problems in management style – although many of these Filin inherited. But the film also goes wider and deeper in looking at the problems within the Bolshoi theatre itself, and at its historically close and dysfunctional connection with the state. As one interviewed source puts it: “If the Bolshoi is sick, it’s because Russia is sick too.”


#48 zobeide

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Posted 06 January 2016 - 08:07 PM

I would like to say to Sohalia that the dancers who Felin invited to join the Bolshoi as well as the dancers he promoted are all extraordinary.
Extraordinary. And the remark about the quality of their dancing which Maria Allash made in the film made her look pathetic. It was sad


I completely agree. I'm sure Allash was referring not just to Obraztsova, Smirnova and Hallberg but also to dancers who came with Filin from the Stanislavsky like Semyon Chudin (who I think is wonderful). And not once was the name Grigorovich mentioned. If Alexei Ratmansky's is to be believed (and I'm sure he is) Grigorovich is really the behind the scenes player who has divided the Bolshoi.

Personally, I found the film rather boring and not at all insightful. I also thought the interviews the filmmaker Nick Reade gave before the film aired (which kind of trashed Filin) were uncalled for. Your film should speak for itself.

#49 Mashinka

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 03:45 AM

As Grigorovich is now eighty nine and has been increasingly frail for some years, why should he be mentioned in a documentary about the current state of affairs in the company?



#50 Natalia

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 04:37 AM

I guess that the filmmaker didn't want to wake up with the head of a horse on his bed?

#51 sandik

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Posted 08 January 2016 - 09:17 PM

As Grigorovich is now eighty nine and has been increasingly frail for some years, why should he be mentioned in a documentary about the current state of affairs in the company?

 

Frail or not, he and his cohort are still a potent force in the company.



#52 Mashinka

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 04:14 AM

His cohort?



#53 sandik

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Posted 09 January 2016 - 05:05 PM

As I understand it, there are still people in the administration of the company who advocate for his work.



#54 Mashinka

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 02:36 AM

Although it seems his ballets don't travel. the home supporters can't get enough of him so wouldn't have thought he needed advocates.  On the other hand we could do with some of those in London where Ashton's work consistently takes second place to MacMillan's.



#55 Drew

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Posted 10 January 2016 - 11:22 AM

Spartacus travels...and some of G's productions of nineteenth-century ballets. His works and productions have also been featured, including Legend of Love, in the international HD broadcasts.

(At the Mariinsky Fateyev has said he hopes to bring Legend of Love on tour soon. I have been wondering if it will turn up at Kennedy Center on their annual visit.)


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