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Friday, November 22

10 posts in this topic

Alastair Macaulay reports from the nosebleed seats at New York City Ballet.

Time was when I could identify most dancers even from the farthest rows. Yet now that some faces are blurry from there, other aspects of dancing grow only clearer. It’s astonishing how distinct — to my eyes, certainly — necks, feet, waists, thighs prove. Phrasing and dynamics grow in significance. And footwork beams out, like reflective glass catching sunlight from an opposite hillside.

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A review of "Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty in The Orange County Register (article is subscription-only, but the accompanying photo gallery is not).

Related.

"Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty" is indeed "grown-up-ier," but the Center Theatre Group presentation is a-okay for kids 10 and up, says the production people. Why not start the older children on a path to rethinking and questioning tales long told?

Related.

The place was truly packed, a rump in every seat. I too couldn't take my eyes off the ballet. It was beautiful and exciting and old (Tchaikovsky) yet very new (hoodies).

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A Daily Mail/Reuters story on Joy Womack and the Bolshoi.

Joy Womack, 19, was born in California, but moved to Russia at the age of 15 to train with the school and graduated in May 2012.

This week she explained her struggles and isolation at the world's leading ballet institution and how she was told that a payment of at least $10,000 would be required just for a minor role.


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Reviews of the Royal Ballet in "Romeo and Juliet."

The Guardian

While Osipova's first scene might strain towards babydoll cuteness, the character's tragedy is subsequently inscribed in the very guts of her dancing. From the ball scene onwards, she makes us feel the extreme precariousness of Juliet's youth, both in the dreamy, defenceless way she lifts her face to drink in the excitement and in the hungry fascination with which she reaches out to touch the beautiful stranger, Romeo.

The New York Times

The success of this version of “Romeo” depends on the force of Juliet’s will: she is not passively poetic. Despite Juliet’s long absences from the stage in Act II, her rebelliousness can seem to carry the whole three-act ballet. The role finds its true climax not in its dance passages with Romeo but in two Act III acting soliloquies of despair. Ms. Osipova was captivating in both vulnerability and ardor.

The Independent

In the tomb scene, MacMillan’s Romeo can’t accept Juliet’s death, half-carrying, half dragging her through the steps of their earlier duets. Osipova and Acosta are a little careful here, but Acosta dies with touching determination. He tries but fails to keep hold of her hand as the poison hits him.

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A review of the Stuttgart Ballet by Neil Norman in The Daily Express.

There are plenty of delights, albeit intermittent ones. A couple of muscular male solos seem too similar for comfort in the first section until a third shows us how it should be done.

The remarkable Marijn Rademaker, blonde mop flying and swaying, shakes, rattles and rolls through a work of juddering intensity set to songs sung by Johnny Cash, including Trent Reznor's brutally painful Hurt.

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The Lafayette Dance Academy presents its Nutcracker.

This year, the Lafayette Dance Academy has been in the final months of promoting its campaign for updating costumes. Organizers hope those who come out this year to see the performance will see much of the result with mostly new costumes on stage. Some of the costumes that have been continually used in the annual performance have been in use since the 1983 debut.

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An item on the new documentary about Tanaquil Le Clercq, "Afternoon of a Faun."

After the nationwide theatrical release, Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil Le Clercq will be available on digital platforms, DVD and Blu-Ray later on in 2014. It will also be available for educational distribution.

PBS strand ‘American Masters’ owns the U.S. broadcast rights.

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A review of Carlos Acosta's "Pig's Foot" by Jude Webber in The Financial Times.

escribing the novel as a “fantastical alternate version of Cuba inspired by the landscapes, the different cultures, the rough magic and the turbulent history of my country,” Acosta does a good job of keeping the reader hooked, though the story of the significance of the amulet itself, and Oscar’s long-awaited return to Pata de Puerco, end up feeling rushed and are probably its least successful passages.

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Ilona Landgraf reviews John Neumeier's "The Little Mermaid" danced by the Hamburg Ballet:

http://danceviewtimes.typepad.com/ilona_landgraf/2013/11/the-triumph-of-love.html

The under­water world created by Neumeier is a beau­tiful yet also mys­ter­ious and fierce play­ground for sea crea­tures. Never­the­less Auerbach's lon­ging sounds give an idea of the mer­maid's deep wish to leave. High above at the water sur­face huge ships occa­si­o­nally pass by, one of which later carries Edvard – the prince – and his crew. For the mermaid's costume Japanese Kabuki- and Noh-Theater were source of inspiration: a special overlong trouser conveys the impression of a lissome fishtail.

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A review of "Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty" by Jean Lenihan in her blog, "Fresh Pencil."

The choreography has no discernible leitmotif, and stage design is awkward in Act I because dual conveyer belts (used to transport fairies) consume the back half of the space. The belts are a likely nod to the constant whisper of Petipa’s bourée feet, but the action loses flavor immediately and one wishes that upstage corners were available for diagonal patterns. There is some impressive petit allegro by the fairies in Act I, but otherwise the dances are surprisingly unremarkable.

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