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Saturday, November 16


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#1 dirac

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 11:49 AM

An item from Gawker summarizing the latest complications at the Bolshoi.

 

Womack also complained that as an American she was treated unfairly, given short-term contracts instead of the "state" contracts the Russian dancers received. She said she was often not paid, and when she was it was always in cash. As an American, Womack also had to pay $18,000 a year in tuition, a fee not required of Russian students.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 11:51 AM

A review of Miami City Ballet by Susan Fulks in The Palm Beach Daily News.

 

First Ventures is composed of three immaculately coached ballets: two choreographed by Balanchine – Ballo della Regina and Serenade – and Christopher Wheeldon’s Polyphonia. All three works were staged and prepared with care, precision and attention to detail. The other undeniable highlight of the program was the presence of some talented young dancers – Nathalia Arja in particular – who are getting recognized and featured in leading roles.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 11:53 AM

BalletX rehearses a new piece by Matthew Neenan.

 

BalletX’s co-artistic director Christine Cox, also observing, said that this program also marks the return of BX dancer Colby Damon to the dance stage, recovered from a knee injury a year ago. He will be dancing in all three works and in “There I Was” he is playing his on music on guitar. Cox commented that “Everyone is really thrilled that Colby is dancing in this program, he has been missed so much,” she said.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 12:17 PM

A review of the Royal Ballet by Giannandrea Poesio for The Spectator.

 

There was a time when the term ‘world première’ was not as fashionable as it is these days. Great works simply ‘premièred’, and their artistic status was not diminished by the fact that the opening had not been advertised as a globally significant event. Which is what ‘world première’ implies, even though it is seldom the case. The term has a sensationalistic ring to it, and should therefore be used carefully and sparingly. According to a recent press release, David Dawson’s The Human Seasons is the second of the five ‘world premières’ that the Royal Ballet will perform this season. Fortunately, this new creation deserves global recognition and admiration, for it is a splendid example of theatre and choreographic composition.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 05:24 AM

A review of the Royal Ballet by Luke Jennings in The Observer.

 

He's not afraid to gild the lily. Dancers rush about, carried on a flood-tide of lyricism, carving decorative flourishes as they go. At moments, the influence of Frederick Ashton is detectable, both structurally – ghostly traces of Symphonic Variations – and in the swooping lushness of the upper body work. But The Human Seasons is not pastoral in the Keatsian sense, nor does it strive for the emotional reverberation of Symphonic Variations. What engages the choreographer here is form. Rigorously adhering to Greg Haines's orchestral score, Dawson creates a succession of fast-evolving, fast-dissolving sculptural moments. There's a fine, clear duet for Edward Watson and Lauren Cuthbertson and another for Eric Underwood and Melissa Hamilton.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 19 November 2013 - 05:46 AM

A review of Ballet San Jose's gala by Janice Berman for the San Francisco Classical Voice.

 

Be of good cheer: Ballet San Jose’s gala Saturday night at the Center for Performing Arts was an exceptionally brilliant exception. Yes, the artists were guests summoned in the name of José Manuel Carreño, the former American Ballet Theatre principal named artistic director last June. No, it doesn’t mean that Ballet San Jose will suddenly blossom into world-class-ness. However, it spoke well for the company’s future. For one thing, the evening, with Music Director George Daugherty conducting Symphony Silicon Valley, was beautifully paced.

 




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