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Monday, November 11


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#1 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:02 PM

Reviews of the Royal Ballet.

 

The Guardian

 

The Human Seasons, the Royal Ballet's first work by David Dawson, is different on every level. Above all, it has a sense of coherence and continuity: the dancing follows the musical lines of Greg Haines's lyrical score; the balletic style is stretched but never broken; duets are always embedded within a wider sense of the ensemble; there is a clear arc. The curtain rises on four couples, with the women held high. Through the course of the work, each couple will come to the fore, will embody a different dynamic – breezy ease, swooping dives, skating slides – and will return to their opening position.

 

 

The New York Times

 

In the way they push ballet to its formal extremes, both Mr. McGregor and Mr. Dawson are strongly influenced by William Forsythe, whose company Mr. Dawson danced in for two years. But “The Human Seasons” has a romanticism and sense of drama that bring an unusual emotional charge to the dance. Those qualities are amplified by Mr. Haines’s score, which alternates slow, shivery lines of string sounds with more propulsive, urgent rhythms.

 

Metro

 

Time, though, is not treating MacMillan’s The Rite Of Spring kindly. Stravinsky’s carnal rhythms have inspired some blood-stirring interpretations in the half century since MacMillan tackled it. Despite Zenaida Yanowsky’s full-blooded portrayal of sacrificial victim The Chosen One, compared with Pina Bausch’s primeval life force, this felt pallid and pedestrian.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:05 PM

More reviews of the Royal.

 

The Financial Times

 

 http://www.ft.com/cm...l#ixzz2kMxJZ2kL

 

He might learn from the example of Kenneth MacMillan, who looked at his first weeks’ work on Le Sacre du printemps, felt all was not well, and started again. To what tremendous effect we know, and saw again on Saturday. This great work, driven by its music, is still devastating, and finds in Zenaida Yanowsky a strong Chosen One. The Royal Ballet’s cast is grandly disciplined and responsive to Stravinsky and MacMillan – albeit I would welcome more urgent tempi at moments. But great admiration to all involved.

 

 

The Evening Standard

 

The Human Seasons is Dawson’s first commission for the Royal Ballet — seen here in a triple bill with two favourites, Wayne McGregor’s Chroma and Kenneth MacMillan’s The Rite of Spring — and it arrives fully formed. His work is a gorgeous thing to look at. Finished to a very high spec, you could say. Classy costumes, vast black and matte gold walls, a string-laden score that tugs at some non-specific emotions. It’s modern luxe, in fashion speak.

 

 

The Stage

 

The Royal Ballet’s first mixed bill of its 2013-14 season opens with Chroma, Wayne McGregor’s ballet that has become a modern classic. Often revived since its 2006 premiere, the piece is an expert combination of music, design and dance that has that rare combination of romantic longing and intellectual, physical and visual rigor. John Pawson’s set design and Lucy Carter’s lighting are exemplary, while the cast is excellent, with Steven McRae, Sarah Lamb and Federico Bonelli especially good on opening night.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:09 PM

An obituary for Australian dancer Laurel Martyn, who has died at age 97.

 

Born Laurel Gill, Martyn trained in Toowoomba and Brisbane before going to London in 1933. There she quickly established herself, winning several awards and joining the Vic-Wells (later Sadler's Wells) Ballet in 1936. She was - the first Australian woman to be accepted into the company led by fellow Australian Robert Helpmann and Fonteyn.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:11 PM

An interview with Boris Eifman.

.....While his relatives could not understand his aspiration to become a choreographer, he was already aware of his creative genius.

 

"It is impossible to say clearly when the flash of genius exactly visited me and I realized that I must connect my life with arts of dance," Eifman said, "Similarly, I cannot answer when and why the idea of one or another ballet flashes in my mind. I came into the world with the ability to comprehend the world, its emotional content through movement. This is the essence of my creative self."

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:12 PM

Alicia Alonso returns home from Spain.

 

There is a whole Cuban generation of excellent first dancers and ballerinas, said Alonso, who added that a part of her company will perform in the Basque country, while a season is being prepared for Havana to mark the 65th anniversary of the Cuban National Ballet.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:16 PM

A review of San Francisco Ballet's 'Cinderella' by Michael Popkin for danceviewtimes.

 

If the lovers were formulaic as characters, they still got three beautifully constructed pas de deux that progressively built in force over the final two acts of the drama, culminating in a deeply happy betrothal duet in the shade of Basil Twist’s magical tree. Athletic, contemporary, and very tender, the dances had the couple circling each other, seeming to swim in the richly colored, French orchestration of Prokofiev’s score, with the circles leading to dramatic press lifts, each of which was different and displayed the ballerina magnificently. Yet effective as they were within the piece the duets themselves remained generic because they revealed nothing about either character. Cinderella and her love were no more specifically developed dancing than acting. 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 01:05 PM

Alabama Ballet offers a sneak preview of its Nutcracker.

 

 One of this year's highlights is a new Mother Ginger costume -- stilts and a dress that eight children can fit under.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:14 PM

An overview of American Ballet Theatre's fall season by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

In this short season, several established stars (notably Marcelo Gomes, Julie Kent, Gillian Murphy) were at their finest. A number of younger principals (Polina Semionova and James Whiteside) and eminent soloists (especially Stella Abrera, Isabella Boylston and Sarah Lane) made important advances, deepening their artistry. And several corps dancers (above all, Gemma Bond, Skylar Brandt, Joseph Gorak, Calvin Royal III, Eric Tamm and Roman Zhurbin) made powerful impressions.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:33 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Moira Macdonald in The Seattle Times.

 

As “Black Swan” reminded us in the movie theaters not long ago — ballet, with its spindly pointed feet and endless limbs, can easily cross into the realm of creepy. Canadian choreographer Crystal Pite makes use of this quality in “Emergence,” a ballet that darkly plays with the idea of the swarm. It made its Pacific Northwest Ballet premiere Friday night, sharing a bill with three dances by Netherlands choreographer Jiri Kylian — and, while “Emergence” was greeted with an enthusiastic standing ovation, it was the Kylian works that remained with me, days later.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:36 PM

The new installment of the New York City Ballet web series "city.ballet" focuses on apprentices.

 

What does it take to be an apprentice with a world-class ballet company? In the latest episode of our series on the New York City Ballet, featuring executive producer Sarah Jessica Parker, we follow trainee dancers determined to make it to the next stage of their career...

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:50 PM

A review of ABT by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

 

 ...Xiomara Reyes and Cory Stearns were debuting as the mismatched couple.  Reyes bubbled through Ashton's "La Fille" when ABT performed that gem a number of years ago, and she is a passionate and moving Juliet, but she didn't quite get the measure of the bored, spoiled Petrovna, making her more of a perky flirt than a mature, self-centered woman.  There were telling moments that floated by unaccented; she seemed more upset for Vera when she came across the younger couple, and just closed the door quietly, whereas Julie Kent closes it as if she were going to strangle someone.  But the final moment, when Natalia drops the flower, all that is left of her brief unsatisfactory fling, was harrowing.  How powerfully Ashton shows that vain, silly people can suffer too. 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:54 PM

A review of Ballet West by Heather Hayes in The Deseret News.

 

Completely opposite is Kylian’s “Petit Mort,” which followed. A contemporary ballet, its Utah debut a few years ago left fans begging for more. This will be the company’s third time performing it in three years. It stands as my current favorite in the repertoire. Flesh-colored costuming and stark lighting meant to darken faces and define limbs creates an entirely different feeling from the preceding story-ballet’s pomp and pageantry.

 




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