mussel

2015 US Tour

196 posts in this topic

So happy we are NOT getting Don Q here in NYC.

Thanks for the heads up, California.

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The official press release follows.

THE JOYCE THEATER FOUNDATION
presents
THE ROYAL BALLET
FIRST NEW YORK CITY ENGAGEMENT IN OVER 11 YEARS
With multiple programs featuring works by
FREDERICK ASHTON, KENNETH MacMILLAN, WAYNE McGREGOR,
LIAM SCARLETT and CHRISTOPHER WHEELDON
AT
DAVID H. KOCH THEATER
LINCOLN CENTER

JUNE 23 – 28, 2015

The Joyce Theater Foundation proudly presents the long-awaited NYC return of the UK’s Royal Ballet – first time in over 11 years – at the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center beginning with a gala performance on June 23, followed by two mix-billed programs of works by Frederick Ashton, Kenneth MacMillan, Wayne McGregor, Liam Scarlett and Christopher Wheeldon through June 28. Tickets for The Royal Ballet can be arranged online at www.DavidHKochTheater.com or by calling (212)-496-0600.

Linda Shelton, Executive Director of The Joyce Theater, said, “I take great delight in The Joyce’s success in presenting extraordinary international companies at the Koch Theater over the past three years, and I am thrilled that the tradition will continue with this engagement of The Royal Ballet. It is especially exciting to welcome the company back to New York after a more than ten year absence and to give audiences the chance to experience dance created and performed by some of the finest artists in the world.”

Director of The Royal Ballet, Kevin O’Hare, said, “Since The Royal Ballet, known at the time as the Sadler’s Wells Ballet, first visited New York in 1949, we have enjoyed a wonderful relationship with audiences there. We very much look forward to returning this year after an 11 year absence at the kind invitation of The Joyce Theater. We will be celebrating the talents of the Company’s current dancers and the wealth of its choreographic achievements past and present with 20th century classics from Frederick Ashton and Kenneth MacMillan and recent works from Wayne McGregor, Christopher Wheeldon and Liam Scarlett.”

From June 23 through 28, The Joyce Theater Foundation will proudly present The Royal Ballet in its first New York appearance since 2004. The engagement opens with a gala performance of Frederick Ashton’s 1964 classic ballet The Dream, inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and created to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth. For its premiere, Ashton cast two young dancers, Anthony Dowell and Antoinette Sibley, as Oberon and Titania and it proved to be the start of one of the most celebrated partnerships of 20th century ballet. This engagement also coincides with the 50th anniversary of the first performance of The Dream in the USA.

The New York engagement also includes two programs celebrating the work of British choreographers closely associated with The Royal Ballet. Program One features Kenneth MacMillan’spowerful Song of the Earth which was created in 1965. Set to Gustav Mahler’s great song cycle, MacMillan explores the fragility of human life and features six episodes which are atmospheric rather than literal interpretations of the text. Song of the Earth will be performed with Frederick Ashton’s The Dream from June 24 – 26.

Program Two is a mixed bill comprised of Infra by Royal Ballet Resident Choreographer Wayne McGregor, The Age of Anxiety by Royal Ballet Artist in Residence Liam Scarlett, and highlights from The Royal Ballet’s repertory, or Divertissements, including the central pas de deux from Royal Ballet Artistic Associate Christopher Wheeldon’s award winning Aeternum.

Infra, meaning “below,” premiered at the Royal Opera House in 2008. McGregor collaborated with artist Julian Opie who created digital images of walking figures below which McGregor’s choreography unfolds through solos, pas de deux and group ensembles as dancers meet, pass and move on. The haunting electronica score by Max Richter sets the tone of an impersonal cityscape. The ballet is about people, a fragmented narrative exploring partial views of humanity and emotion.
Liam Scarlett’s most recent work for the Company takes its name from Leonard Bernstein’s Symphony No2 The Age of Anxiety, and is inspired by WH Auden’s 1946 poem of the same name. John Macfarlane’s lavish set and costume designs create a backdrop of 1940s wartime New York against which four disparate characters meet in a bar and try to make sense of their shifting worlds.

The Joyce Theater Foundation’s presentation of The Royal Ballet marks a continued presence of programming by The Joyce Theater Foundation at Lincoln Center. Since April 2012, The Joyce has successfully presented annual week-long engagements at the David H. Koch Theater, beginning with Sylvie Guillem’s 6000 miles away. Nederlands Dans Theater followed in 2013, Ballet Preljocaj’s Snow White last April (2014) and the National Ballet of Canada’s production of Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in September 2014. The Joyce plans to continue to present at the Koch Theater, helping to ensure that New York City experiences a diversity of outstanding large-scale dance productions while increasing The Joyce’s capacity to engage new audiences.

Kevin O’Hare is Director of The Royal Ballet. Appointed in July 2012 following the retirement of Monica Mason, he is responsible for driving the artistic direction of the Company. He is committed to the promotion of outstanding creativity and artistic excellence, developing talent and widening the Company’s performing platform. O’Hare was born in Yorkshire, England. He trained at The Royal Ballet School and, through an exchange program, with the Royal Danish Ballet. He began his performing career with The Royal Ballet’s sister company Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet, and stayed with that company as a Principal during its transformation to Birmingham Royal Ballet. During this time he performed extensively in the UK and internationally, including as a guest artist with many leading companies. His repertory included all the leading classical roles, such as “Prince Siegfried” (Swan Lake), “Prince Florimund” (The Sleeping Beauty), “Albrecht” (Giselle) and “Romeo” (in BRB’s first performance of Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet). O’Hare has worked with many leading figures in the ballet world, including Ninette de Valois, Peter Wright, Frederick Ashton, MacMillan and David Bintley, and created several roles, including “Amynta” (in Bintley’s Sylvia). He also produced many galas and choreographic evenings. O’Hare retired from the stage in 2000, entering into a traineeship in company management with the Royal Shakespeare Company. This led to the post of Company Director with BRB in 2001, and in 2004 he joined The Royal Ballet as Company Manager. He was made Administrative Director in 2009 before being appointed to his current role. In 2013 he was appointed to the board of Dance UK.

Kenneth MacMillan (Choreographer) (1929–1992) was one of the leading choreographers of his generation. His close association with The Royal Ballet began when he joined The Sadler's Wells School (now The Royal Ballet School) at age 15. He was Director of the Company 1970–1977 and Principal Choreographer 1977–1992. His ballets are distinguished by their penetrating psychological insight and expressive use of classical language. These qualities are demonstrated in his many works for the Company, which include Romeo and Juliet, Gloria, Manon, Mayerling and Requiem. MacMillan was born in Dunfermline, Scotland and discovered ballet while evacuated to Rutford during World War II. At age 15, he forged a letter from his father to Ninette de Valois requesting an audition. He joined Sadler’s Wells School on a full scholarship, later entering the Company. He created his first major work, Danses concertantes, in 1955 and went on to become one of the world’s leading choreographers. Positions away from the Company included Director of Deutsche Oper Ballet Berlin (1966–1969) and Associate Director of American Ballet Theatre (1984–1990). He continued to create masterpieces throughout his life, including The Prince of the Pagodas (1989) and his last work, The Judas Tree, in 1992. He died backstage at the Royal Opera House during a revival of Mayerling. Some of MacMillan's most significant muses included Lynn Seymour, Christopher Gable, Monica Mason, Marcia Haydée, David Wall, Darcey Bussell and Irek Mukhamedov.

Frederick Ashton (Choreographer). Founding Choreographer of The Royal Ballet Frederick Ashton (1904–1988) was one of the most influential dance figures of the 20th century. In his work with the Company, he developed the distinctive “English style” and left a vast corpus of works that are regularly performed by The Royal Ballet and companies around the world, among them La Fille mal gardée, Marguerite and Armand and Symphonic Variations. Ashton was born in Ecuador to British parents. He first saw ballet when Anna Pavlova performed in Lima in 1917, later claiming, “From the end of that evening I wanted to dance.” In England, Ashton was tutored by Leonid Massine and made his choreographic debut for Marie Rambert in 1926. After working with Rambert and Ida Rubinstein he was appointed principal choreographer of Vic-Wells Ballet (later The Royal Ballet) by Ninette de Valois in 1938. With De Valois Ashton played a crucial role in determining the course of the Company and The Royal Ballet School. In 1963 he took over from De Valois as Director of the Company and introduced several significant works, including Nijinska's Les Noces and Balanchine's Serenade, and commissioned MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet. He retired in 1970 but continued to choreograph throughout his life, producing his last major work, Rhapsody, in 1980. Ashton's style is distinctive for its épaulement (the way the head and shoulders are held) and fleet footwork. All are notable for their combination of elegance and breathtaking technical demands.

Christopher Wheeldon (Choreographer). English choreographer Christopher Wheeldon is Artistic Associate of The Royal Ballet. He trained at The Royal Ballet School and danced with the Company 1991 through 1993. For The Royal Ballet, he created the one-act ballets Tryst (2002), DGV: Danse à grande vitesse (2006), Electric Counterpoint (2008), ‘Trespass’ (Metamorphosis: Titian 2012, in collaboration with Alastair Marriott) and Aeternum (2013, winner of the Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production), as well as the full-length ballets Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in 2011 (The Royal Ballet's first full-length commission in 20 years) and The Winter's Tale in 2014. Wheeldon was born in Yeovil, England and trained at The Royal Ballet School. In 1991 he won gold medal at the Prix de Lausanne with a solo of his own creation and that year entered The Royal Ballet, where Kenneth MacMillan encouraged him in his choreographic work. In 1993 Wheeldon joined New York City Ballet and was promoted to soloist in 1998. He created his first work for NYCB, Slavonic Dances, in 1997 and became the company’s first Resident Choreographer in 2001. Works for NYCB include Polyphonia (2001, winner of a London Critics’ Circle Award and the Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production), An American in Paris (2005) and The Nightingale and the Rose (2007). Wheeldon choreographs regularly for leading companies, including Boston Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Dutch National Ballet and Pennsylvania Ballet. In 2007 he founded Morphoses/The Wheeldon Company and became the first British choreographer to create a new work for the Bolshoi Ballet. In 2012 he collaborated with Alastair Marriott on the closing ceremony of the London Olympic Games, watched by 23.2 million people worldwide.

Liam Scarlett (Choreographer). English choreographer Liam Scarlett trained at The Royal Ballet School and danced with The Royal Ballet, retiring as a dancer in 2012 to focus on his choreographic career. That year he was appointed The Royal Ballet’s first Artist in Residence. His works for The Royal Ballet include Despite and Vayamos al Diablo (2006), Consolations and Liebestraum (2009 – nominated for a Critics’ Circle Award), Asphodel Meadows (2010 – nominated for a South Bank Award and an Olivier Award, and winner of a Critics’ Circle Award), Sweet Violets, ‘Diana and Actaeon’ from Metamorphosis: Titian 2012 (2012), Hansel and Gretel (2013) and the Jubilee pas de deux in celebration of HM The Queen's Diamond Jubilee. In the 2014/15 Season, he returned to create a new work, The Age of Anxiety. Scarlett was born in Ipswich, England and trained at the Linda Shipton School of Dancing before joining The Royal Ballet School, White Lodge. While at the School, he won both the Kenneth MacMillan and Ursula Moreton Choreographic Awards, and was the first recipient of the De Valois Trust Fund Choreographers’ Award. He graduated into The Royal Ballet in 2005 and was promoted to First Artist in 2008. His repertory as a dancer included “Peter Rabbit” (Tales of Beatrix Potter), “Vicar/The March Hare” (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland) and roles in Swan Lake, The Prince of the Pagodas, and La Fille mal gardée. Scarlett's works for other companies include Hinterland (2007) and Indigo Children (2008) for Ballet Black, Gargoyles for New York City Ballet (2009), Viscera (2012) and Euphotic (2013) for Miami City Ballet (also designed by Scarlett), Promenade Sentimentale for K-Ballet (2013), Serpent for BalletBoyz: The Talent (2013) and No Man's Land for English National Ballet (2014).

The Joyce Theater Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization, has proudly served the dance community and its audiences for three decades. The founders, Cora Cahan and Eliot Feld, acquired and renovated the Elgin Theater in Chelsea, which opened as The Joyce Theater in 1982. The Joyce Theater is named in honor of Joyce Mertz, beloved daughter of LuEsther T. Mertz. It was LuEsther’s clear, undaunted vision and abundant generosity that made it imaginable and ultimately possible to build the theater. One of the only theaters built by dancers for dance, The Joyce Theater has provided an intimate and elegant home for more than 320 domestic and international companies. The Joyce has also commissioned more than 130 new dances since 1992. In 2009, The Joyce opened Dance Art New York (DANY) Studios to provide affordable studios for rehearsals, auditions, classes, and workshops for independent choreographers, non-profit dance companies, and the dance/theater communities. New York City public school students and teachers annually benefit from The Joyce’s Dance Education Program, and adult audiences get closer to dance through informative Dance Talks and post-performance Dance Chat discussions. The Joyce Theater now features an annual season of approximately 48 weeks with over 340 performances for audiences in excess of 135,000.

The Royal Ballet, based at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, is Great Britain’s most prestigious ballet company and one of the great classical ballet companies of the world. Led by Director Kevin O’Hare, the Company has a wide-ranging repertory that showcases the great 19th century classics alongside heritage works including those of its two great 20th century choreographers, Frederick Ashton and Kenneth MacMillan. In addition, The Royal Ballet performs new works by Royal Ballet Resident Choreographer Wayne McGregor and Royal Ballet Artistic Associate Christopher Wheeldon, two of the foremost international choreographers of today. The Royal Ballet continues to create and encourage new choreography and appointed Liam Scarlett as Royal Ballet Artist in Residence in 2012.

The Joyce Theater presents The Royal Ballet of London at the David H. Koch Theater from June 23 – 28. The engagement opens with a Gala performance of Frederick Ashton’s The Dream on Tuesday, June 23 at 6:30pm. Program One (The Dream / Song of the Earth) will be Wednesday, June 24 & Thursday, June 25 at 7:30pm and Friday, June 26 at 8pm; Program Two (The Age of Anxiety / Highlights from The Royal Ballet’s repertory / Infra) will be Saturday, June 27 at 2pm & 8pm and Sunday, June 28 at 2pm & 8pm. Tickets, ranging in price from $35-$150, can be purchased through www.DavidHKochTheater.com or by calling (212)-496-0600. Please note: ticket prices are subject to change. For more information, please visit www.Joyce.org.

* * *

Major foundation support for Joyce Theater Presentations at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater has been provided by the Ford Foundation, The Howard Gilman Foundation, and The Pasculano Foundation. Major individual support has been provided by David Herro and Jay Franke. Additional major individual support has been provided by Kerry Clayton and Paige Royer. Additional major corporate support has been provided by First Republic Bank.

Leadership support for The Joyce Theater 2014–2015 season has been received from the LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trust. Major support has been provided by the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, and The Shubert Foundation. Additional major support has been provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance, Northern Trust, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, The SHS Foundation, and the Windhover Foundation.

The Joyce’s presenting initiative at the David H. Koch Theater is supported by a grant award from the National Endowment for the Arts; and made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; as well as supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

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I'll be curious to see what people think of Scarlett's Age of Anxiety -- I don't know enough about the Robbins work to make a comparison, but I imagine there are still people around who do.

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Have people noticed that tickets are already on sale? http://www.davidhkochtheater.com/moreinfoRB.html

Unfortunately, you can't use seat selection on-line. I wonder if that's available if you go to the ticket office.

Pricing is a puzzle. For the opening night gala, it looks like the prime seats in orchestra and first tier aren't listed. Perhaps those will be sold at super-premium prices later. The remaining seats actually look a little cheaper than the rest of the week. Odd.

Another puzzle: in the several notices about their visit in the last couple of days, there hasn't been any mention of the Lincoln Center Festival. I wonder if it's possible the Festival is bringing another company in July. I have googled "Lincoln Center Festival" every which way and haven't been able to turn up any hints.

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This is not being presented by Lincoln Center festival. The Joyce Foundation, with additional funding from other sources, rented the Koch Theater for that week. I think most of the tickets for the first night are being held from sale because the first night is a gala to raise money for the Joyce Foundation. The gala program is only the Dream (a one hour ballet), without any additional ballets on the program. That's why the regular seats are a little cheaper than other nights. You are essentially getting half an evening of ballet. On the other nights the Dream is being presented along with the MacMillan work.

From what I recall, the Scarlett work was not well reviewed.

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This is not being presented by Lincoln Center festival. The Joyce Foundation, with additional funding from other sources, rented the Koch Theater for that week. I think most of the tickets for the first night are being held from sale because the first night is a gala to raise money for the Joyce Foundation. The gala program is only the Dream (a one hour ballet), without any additional ballets on the program. That's why the regular seats are a little cheaper than other nights. You are essentially getting half an evening of ballet. On the other nights the Dream is being presented along with the MacMillan work.

From what I recall, the Scarlett work was not well reviewed.

Ah, so that's how it works.

I remember the reviews of the Scarlett work from its premiere, but there really wasn't any comparison with the Robbins, except to note that R had used the score in the past. In NYC, I think they'll get an audience that has more knowledge about the earlier work...

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This is not being presented by Lincoln Center festival. The Joyce Foundation, with additional funding from other sources, rented the Koch Theater for that week. I think most of the tickets for the first night are being held from sale because the first night is a gala to raise money for the Joyce Foundation. The gala program is only the Dream (a one hour ballet), without any additional ballets on the program. That's why the regular seats are a little cheaper than other nights. You are essentially getting half an evening of ballet. On the other nights the Dream is being presented along with the MacMillan work.

From what I recall, the Scarlett work was not well reviewed.

Neither was the McGregor. What a strange assortment of work to present to a NY audience. Still, it's not the "same old, same old". I just purchased a seat for Wednesday (day after Gala). Got second Ring, first row! Yeah!

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Some ticket buying advice: CALL THE BOX OFFICE if you want to pick out your seats. I tried ordering online and kept getting put into seat D118 for the ring I chose, which didn't seem like it would be one of the best seats available in that price range this far in advance. So, I called the box office and the very helpful and patient agent put me in seat A105 -- same date, same ring, same price as the seat in Row D.

FYI, here's a seating chart to refer to if you call: http://www.davidhkochtheater.com/Downloads/DHKT-FullChart.pdf

Per the agent, although the Joyce Foundation is renting the theater for the Royal Ballet run, it's not using the house ticketing system and that's why you can't select your seats online as you can for NYCB etc.

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Another puzzle: in the several notices about their visit in the last couple of days, there hasn't been any mention of the Lincoln Center Festival. I wonder if it's possible the Festival is bringing another company in July. I have googled "Lincoln Center Festival" every which way and haven't been able to turn up any hints.

Usually we'd hear any news about a major company as part of LCF by now. By processing elimination we can rule out Mariinksy as they're here right now, no Bolshoi as they were here last year. The only news I've faintly heard is Hamburg may bring Liliom to NYC this year. 2014/15 is a banner year, we've had Bolshoi, NBoC, Mik, now Mariinsky, and then RB, not to mention NYCB churns out amazing performances night after night and the upcoming 75th ABT season, may be it's time for my bank account to recuperate a bit.

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If it were not for this thread, then it would not even have occurred to me that tickets were already on sale! So, thanks to...everyone. I did call box office, as Kathleen O'Connell suggested...got just the seats I wanted at reasonable price. So reasonable, that if I end up not able to use every single ticket--always a risk when I buy this far out--I will consider it a sound investment in getting good seats for the other performances.

I also would have preferred to know casts and Lincoln Center festival plans before making final decisions, but am very well satisfied. Also--any presenters/impresarios reading this thread take note: I'm very pleased with the decision to bring mixed bill programs showing the 'classic' Royal (Ashton/Macmillan) and 'new' Royal (Macgregor, Scarlett, Wheeldon) and even, with the highlights evening, a chance to see what I assume will be a range of dancers. (With full length ballets it is very rare that I would be willing to buy tickets without knowing casts.)

Also: "The Dream" -- that's as close to a perfect ballet as there is. Even with less than perfect casting.

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I bought tickets for the days when I knew there was no chance I would have any interest in seeing the competing SL across the plaza at ABT. Sadly, there are an increasing number of ABT dancers that I have zero interest in seeing in SL. Hoping that they announce casting for RB soon. At this point I'm much more interested in the program with the Dream than the other program. Since the Wheeldon ballet was so well reviewed, I wish they were doing the Wheeldon work in its entirety.

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Since the Wheeldon ballet was so well reviewed, I wish they were doing the Wheeldon work in its entirety.

I wonder if presenters are thinking that "Age of Anxiety" is appropriate as a New York themed ballet...But in any case the overall programming is more intriguing/thoughtful than we sometimes get--credit to the Royal and Joyce foundation for that.

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Some ticket buying advice: CALL THE BOX OFFICE if you want to pick out your seats. I tried ordering online and kept getting put into seat D118 for the ring I chose, which didn't seem like it would be one of the best seats available in that price range this far in advance. So, I called the box office and the very helpful and patient agent put me in seat A105 -- same date, same ring, same price as the seat in Row D.

FYI, here's a seating chart to refer to if you call: http://www.davidhkochtheater.com/Downloads/DHKT-FullChart.pdf

Per the agent, although the Joyce Foundation is renting the theater for the Royal Ballet run, it's not using the house ticketing system and that's why you can't select your seats online as you can for NYCB etc.

Kathleen, I wish I had remembered your advice when I booked my ticket early but online. I was assigned a seat in the last row of the 2nd Ring. I knew I would be in NYC last Sunday so phoned in advance to see if I could exchange my seat. (I had looked at the seating availability online and could see there were seats in Row A of the 3rd Ring though nothing closer up front in 2nd Ring) The ticket agent had to check with a supervisor but said yes, I could exchange the seat but not the date. I was sorely disappointed when the box office agent told me in emphatic terms that NO exchanges were possible and that this was a Royal Ballet decision. I pressed the point but to no avail. He also admitted that there were plenty of seats available but would not be swayed. I really don't see the necessity of such a strict exchange policy and I told him I thought it was a terrible example of customer relations. Grumble.

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Kathleen, I wish I had remembered your advice when I booked my ticket early but online. I was assigned a seat in the last row of the 2nd Ring. I knew I would be in NYC last Sunday so phoned in advance to see if I could exchange my seat. (I had looked at the seating availability online and could see there were seats in Row A of the 3rd Ring though nothing closer up front in 2nd Ring) The ticket agent had to check with a supervisor but said yes, I could exchange the seat but not the date. I was sorely disappointed when the box office agent told me in emphatic terms that NO exchanges were possible and that this was a Royal Ballet decision. I pressed the point but to no avail. He also admitted that there were plenty of seats available but would not be swayed. I really don't see the necessity of such a strict exchange policy and I told him I thought it was a terrible example of customer relations. Grumble.

Ugh! It would be one thing if you were demanding all of your money back because you didn't like the casting or something. But if there are empty seats, I really don't see why they can't accommodate you. Plus, it sounds like the left hand (the ticket agent's supervisor) told you one thing and the right hand (the box office agent) told you something different, which is not a good thing for all kinds of reasons -- not the least of which is inconveniencing a valuable audience member such as you!

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The people at the Koch box office are very rigid in connection with any exchanges for companies other than NYCB. I've experienced it first hand in reference to ABT and Paul Taylor. For the ABT engagement at the Koch last year, I wanted to exchange my single tix for two seats together at the same performance, same price level. No, not allowed. We had to sit separately.

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Usually we'd hear any news about a major company as part of LCF by now. By processing elimination we can rule out Mariinksy as they're here right now, no Bolshoi as they were here last year. The only news I've faintly heard is Hamburg may bring Liliom to NYC this year. 2014/15 is a banner year, we've had Bolshoi, NBoC, Mik, now Mariinsky, and then RB, not to mention NYCB churns out amazing performances night after night and the upcoming 75th ABT season, may be it's time for my bank account to recuperate a bit.

Several months ago I received a flyer regarding the LCF. The National Ballet of China will be at the 2015 LCF. They will be bringing two ballets - “The Peony Pavilion” and “The Red Detachment of Women”. See URL below and click on DANCE.

http://www.lincolncenterfestival.org/

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Casting has been posted for the Kennedy Center performances:

Marianela Nunez, Carlos Acosta – Tue., June 9 & Fri., June 12 at 7:30 p.m.
Sarah Lamb, Federico Bonelli – Wed., June 10 at 7:30 p.m.
Iana Salenko, Steven McRae – Thu., June 11 at 7:30 p.m., Sat. June 13 at 1:30 p.m.
Natalia Osipova, Matthew Golding – Sat., June 13 at 7:30 p.m.
Roberta Marquez, Alexander Campbell – Sun., June 14 at 1:30 p.m.

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Any news of casting in NYC? I wonder if Osipova will be allowed to perform, given that Kevin has some kind of non-compete clause in the ABT contracts. That's why the Mikhailovsky performed in the fall instead of last spring.

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Any news of casting in NYC? I wonder if Osipova will be allowed to perform, given that Kevin has some kind of non-compete clause in the ABT contracts. That's why the Mikhailovsky performed in the fall instead of last spring.

Osipova is no longer on the ABT roster; she is appearing as a guest performer. I doubt that the non-compete clause applies to her.

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For what it's worth, here's some casting information on the NY portion of the tour:

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/04/23/royal-ballet-sets-cast-for-lincoln-center-visit/?ref=arts

This little Artsbeat piece leave lots of info up in the air. Not buying any additional tickets until they come up with some actual info about casting for all the performances. Why is this taking so long? Also, why haven't they announced what divertissments are going to be performed.

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Official release:

CASTING ANNOUNCED FOR

THE JOYCE THEATER’S PRESENTATION OF

THE ROYAL BALLET

THE COMPANY’S FIRST NEW YORK CITY ENGAGEMENT IN OVER 11 YEARS



AT

DAVID H. KOCH THEATER

LINCOLN CENTER



JUNE 23 – 28, 2015



ENGAGEMENT OPENS WITH JUNE 23 GALA PERFORMANCE

HONORING

CHRISTOPHER WHEELDON



(NEW YORK, NY) The Joyce Theater Foundation, Linda Shelton, Executive Director, announced today casting for the highly anticipated NYC return of the UK’s Royal Ballet – first time in over 11 years – at the David H. H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center beginning with a gala performance honoring Christopher Wheeldon on June 23, followed by two mix-billed programs of works by Frederick Ashton, Kenneth MacMillan, Wayne McGregor, Liam Scarlett and Christopher Wheeldon through June 28. Tickets for The Royal Ballet can be arranged online at www.DavidHKochTheater.com or by calling (212)-496-0600.



Casting for The Joyce Theater’s presentation of The Royal Ballet

June 23, 7:30pm – Gala Performance supporting The Joyce Theater and The Royal Ballet

The Dream -- Sarah Lamb/Steven McRae





PROGRAM ONE

June 24, 7:30pm

The Dream -- Sarah Lamb/Steven McRae

Song of the Earth -- Marianela Nuñez/Nehemiah Kish/Carlos Acosta

June 25, 7:30pm

The Dream -- Natalia Osipova/Matthew Golding

Song of the Earth -- Laura Morera/Nehemiah Kish/Edward Watson

June 26, 8pm

The Dream -- Natalia Osipova/Matthew Golding

Song of the Earth -- Lauren Cuthbertson/Rupert Pennefather/Edward Watson







PROGRAM TWO

June 27, 2pm

The Age of Anxiety -- Sarah Lamb/Alexander Campbell/Johannes/Stepanek/Federico Bonelli



Divertissements:

Voices of Spring -- Akane Takada/Valentino Zucchetti

Borrowed Light -- Marcelino Sambé

The Dying Swan -- Calvin Richardson

Le Train Bleu

‘Le beau gosse’ -- Vadim Muntagirov

Aeturnum pas de deux -- Claire Calvert/Ryoichi Hirano

Carousel pas de deux --Lauren Cuthbertson/ Matthew Golding



Infra Meaghan Grace Hinkis/Olivia Cowley/Yasmine Naghdi/Sarah Lamb/Fumi Kaneko/Camille Bracher/Matthew Ball/Tristan Dyer/Federico Bonelli/Nicol Edmonds/Sander Blommaert/Luca Acri



June 27, 8pm

The Age of Anxiety -- Laura Morera/Steven McRae/Bennet Gartside/Tristan Dyer



Divertissements:

Voices of Spring -- Yuhui Choe/Alexander Campbell

Borrowed Light -- Marcelino Sambé

The Dying Swan -- Matthew Ball

Le Train Bleu

‘Le beau gosse’ -- Vadim Muntagirov

Aeturnum pas de deux -- Marianela Nuñez/Federico Bonelli

Carousel pas de deux -- Sarah Lamb/Carlos Acosta



Infra -- Francesca Hayward/Natalia Osipova/Marianela Nuñez/Lauren Cuthbertson/Melissa Hamilton/ Yuhui Choe/Edward Watson/Ryoichi Hirano/ Ricardo Cervera/Eric Underwood/James Hay/Paul Kay



June 28, 2pm

The Age of Anxiety -- Sarah Lamb/Alexander Campbell/Johannes

Stepanek/Federico Bonelli

Divertissements:

Voices of Spring -- Akana Takada/Valentino Zucchetti

Borrowed Light -- Luca Acri

The Dying Swan -- Matthew Ball

Le Train Bleu

‘Le beau gosse’ -- James Hay

Aeturnum pas de deux -- Claire Calvert/Ryoichi Hirano

Carousel pas de deux -- Lauren Cuthbertson/Matthew Golding



Infra -- Meaghan Grace Hinkis/Olivia Cowley/Yasmine Naghdi/Sarah Lamb/Fumi Kaneko/Camille

Bracher/Matthew Ball/Tristan Dyer/Federico Bonelli/Nicol Edmonds/Sander Blommaert/
Luca Acri



June 28, 7:30pm

The Age of Anxiety -- Laura Morera/Steven McRae/Bennet Gartside/Tristan Dyer



Divertissements:

Voices of Spring -- Yuhui Choe/Alexander Campbell

Borrowed Light -- Marcelino Sambé

The Dying Swan -- Calvin Richardson

Le Train Bleu

‘Le beau gosse’ -- Vadim Muntagirov

Aeturnum pas de deux -- Marianela Nuñez/Federico Bonelli

Carousel pas de deux -- Sarah Lamb/Carlos Acosta



Infra -- Francesca Hayward/Natalia Osipova/Marianela Nuñez/Lauren Cuthbertson/Melissa Hamilton/Yuhui Choe/Edward Watson/Ryoichi Hirano/ Ricardo Cervera/Eric Underwood/James Hay/Paul Kay



The Royal Opera House reserves the right to change the cast and program due to events beyond its control



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From June 23 through 28, The Joyce Theater Foundation will proudly present The Royal Ballet in its first New York appearance since 2004. The engagement opens with a gala performance of Frederick Ashton’s 1964 classic ballet The Dream, inspired by Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and created to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth. For its premiere, Ashton cast two young dancers, Anthony Dowell and Antoinette Sibley, as Oberon and Titania and it proved to be the start of one of the most celebrated partnerships of 20th century ballet. This engagement also coincides with the 50th anniversary of the first performance of The Dream in the USA.



The New York engagement also includes two programs celebrating the work of British choreographers closely associated with The Royal Ballet. Program One features Kenneth MacMillan’spowerful Song of the Earth which was created in 1965. Set to Gustav Mahler’s great song cycle, MacMillan explores the fragility of human life and features six episodes which are atmospheric rather than literal interpretations of the text. Song of the Earth will be performed with Frederick Ashton’s The Dream from June 24 – 26.



Program Two is a mixed bill comprised of Infra by Royal Ballet Resident Choreographer Wayne McGregor, The Age of Anxiety by Royal Ballet Artist in Residence Liam Scarlett, and highlights from The Royal Ballet’s repertory, or Divertissements, including the central pas de deux from Royal Ballet Artistic Associate Christopher Wheeldon’s award winning Aeternum.



Infra, meaning “below,†premiered at the Royal Opera House in 2008. McGregor collaborated with artist Julian Opie who created digital images of walking figures below which McGregor’s choreography unfolds through solos, pas de deux and group ensembles as dancers meet, pass and move on. The haunting electronica score by Max Richter sets the tone of an impersonal cityscape. The ballet is about people, a fragmented narrative exploring partial views of humanity and emotion.



Liam Scarlett’s most recent work for the Company takes its name from Leonard Bernstein’s Symphony No2 The Age of Anxiety, and is inspired by WH Auden’s 1946 poem of the same name. John Macfarlane’s lavish set and costume designs create a backdrop of 1940s wartime New York against which four disparate characters meet in a bar and try to make sense of their shifting worlds.



The Joyce Theater Foundation’s presentation of The Royal Ballet marks a continued presence of programming by The Joyce Theater Foundation at Lincoln Center. Since April 2012, The Joyce has successfully presented annual week-long engagements at the David H. Koch Theater, beginning with Sylvie Guillem’s 6000 miles away. Nederlands Dans Theater followed in 2013, Ballet Preljocaj’s Snow White last April (2014) and the National Ballet of Canada’s production of Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in September 2014. The Joyce plans to continue to present at the Koch Theater, helping to ensure that New York City experiences a diversity of outstanding large-scale dance productions while increasing The Joyce’s capacity to engage new audiences.



Kevin O’Hare is Director of The Royal Ballet. Appointed in July 2012 following the retirement of Monica Mason, he is responsible for driving the artistic direction of the Company. He is committed to the promotion of outstanding creativity and artistic excellence, developing talent and widening the Company’s performing platform. O’Hare was born in Yorkshire, England. He trained at The Royal Ballet School and, through an exchange program, with the Royal Danish Ballet. He began his performing career with The Royal Ballet’s sister company Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet, and stayed with that company as a Principal during its transformation to Birmingham Royal Ballet. During this time he performed extensively in the UK and internationally, including as a guest artist with many leading companies. His repertory included all the leading classical roles, such as “Prince Siegfried†(Swan Lake), “Prince Florimund†(The Sleeping Beauty), “Albrecht†(Giselle) and “Romeo†(in BRB’s first performance of Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet). O’Hare has worked with many leading figures in the ballet world, including Ninette de Valois, Peter Wright, Frederick Ashton, MacMillan and David Bintley, and created several roles, including “Amynta†(in Bintley’s Sylvia). He also produced many galas and choreographic evenings. O’Hare retired from the stage in 2000, entering into a traineeship in company management with the Royal Shakespeare Company. This led to the post of Company Director with BRB in 2001, and in 2004 he joined The Royal Ballet as Company Manager. He was made Administrative Director in 2009 before being appointed to his current role. In 2013 he was appointed to the board of Dance UK.



Kenneth MacMillan (Choreographer) (1929–1992) was one of the leading choreographers of his generation. His close association with The Royal Ballet began when he joined The Sadler's Wells School (now The Royal Ballet School) at age 15. He was Director of the Company 1970–1977 and Principal Choreographer 1977â–1992. His ballets are distinguished by their penetrating psychological insight and expressive use of classical language. These qualities are demonstrated in his many works for the Company, which include Romeo and Juliet, Gloria, Manon, Mayerling and Requiem. MacMillan was born in Dunfermline, Scotland and discovered ballet while evacuated to Rutford during World War II. At age 15, he forged a letter from his father to Ninette de Valois requesting an audition. He joined Sadler’s Wells School on a full scholarship, later entering the Company. He created his first major work, Danses concertantes, in 1955 and went on to become one of the world’s leading choreographers. Positions away from the Company included Director of Deutsche Oper Ballet Berlin (1966–1969) and Asssociate Director of American Ballet Theatre (1984–1990). He coontinued to create masterpieces throughout his life, including The Prince of the Pagodas (1989) and his last work, The Judas Tree, in 1992. He died backstage at the Royal Opera House during a revival of Mayerling. Some of MacMillan's most significant muses included Lynn Seymour, Christopher Gable, Monica Mason, Marcia Haydée, David Wall, Darcey Bussell and Irek Mukhamedov.



Frederick Ashton (Choreographer). Founding Choreographer of The Royal Ballet Frederick Ashton (1904–“1988) was one of the most influential dance figures of the 20th century. In his work with the Company, he developed the distinctive “English style†and left a vast corpus of works that are regularly performed by The Royal Ballet and companies around the world, among them La Fille mal gardée, Marguerite and Armand and Symphonic Variations. Ashton was born in Ecuador to British parents. He first saw ballet when Anna Pavlova performed in Lima in 1917, later claiming, “From the end of that evening I wanted to dance.†In England, Ashton was tutored by Leonid Massine and made his choreographic debut for Marie Rambert in 1926. After working with Rambert and Ida Rubinstein he was appointed principal choreographer of Vic-Wells Ballet (later The Royal Ballet) by Ninette de Valois in 1938. With De Valois Ashton played a crucial role in determining the course of the Company and The Royal Ballet School. In 1963 he took over from De Valois as Director of the Company and introduced several significant works, including Nijinska's Les Noces and Balanchine's Serenade, and commissioned MacMillan's Romeo and Juliet. He retired in 1970 but continued to choreograph throughout his life, producing his last major work, Rhapsody, in 1980. Ashton's style is distinctive for its épaulement (the way the head and shoulders are held) and fleet footwork. All are notable for their combination of elegance and breathtaking technical demands.



Christopher Wheeldon (Choreographer). English choreographer Christopher Wheeldon is Artistic Associate of The Royal Ballet. He trained at The Royal Ballet School and danced with the Company 1991 through 1993. For The Royal Ballet, he created the one-act ballets Tryst (2002), DGV: Danse à grande vitesse (2006), Electric Counterpoint (2008), ‘Trespass’ (Metamorphosis: Titian 2012, in collaboration with Alastair Marriott) and Aeternum (2013, winner of the Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production), as well as the full-length ballets Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in 2011 (The Royal Ballet's first full-length commission in 20 years) and The Winter's Tale in 2014. Wheeldon was born in Yeovil, England and trained at The Royal Ballet School. In 1991 he won gold medal at the Prix de Lausanne with a solo of his own creation and that year entered The Royal Ballet, where Kenneth MacMillan encouraged him in his choreographic work. In 1993 Wheeldon joined New York City Ballet and was promoted to soloist in 1998. He created his first work for NYCB, Slavonic Dances, in 1997 and became the company’s first Resident Choreographer in 2001. Works for NYCB include Polyphonia (2001, winner of a London Critics’ Circle Award and the Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production), An American in Paris (2005) and The Nightingale and the Rose (2007). Wheeldon choreographs regularly for leading companies, including Boston Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Dutch National Ballet and Pennsylvania Ballet. In 2007 he founded Morphoses/The Wheeldon Company and became the first British choreographer to create a new work for the Bolshoi Ballet. In 2012 he collaborated with Alastair Marriott on the closing ceremony of the London Olympic Games, watched by 23.2 million people worldwide.



Liam Scarlett (Choreographer). English choreographer Liam Scarlett trained at The Royal Ballet School and danced with The Royal Ballet, retiring as a dancer in 2012 to focus on his choreographic career. That year he was appointed The Royal Ballet’s first Artist in Residence. His works for The Royal Ballet include Despite and Vayamos al Diablo (2006), Consolations and Liebestraum (2009 – nominated for a Critics’ Circlle Award), Asphodel Meadows (2010 – nominated for a South BBank Award and an Olivier Award, and winner of a Critics’ Circle Award), Sweet Violets, ‘Diana and Actaeon’ from Metamorphosis: Titian 2012 (2012), Hansel and Gretel (2013) and the Jubilee pas de deux in celebration of HM The Queen's Diamond Jubilee. In the 2014/15 Season, he returned to create a new work, The Age of Anxiety. Scarlett was born in Ipswich, England and trained at the Linda Shipton School of Dancing before joining The Royal Ballet School, White Lodge. While at the School, he won both the Kenneth MacMillan and Ursula Moreton Choreographic Awards, and was the first recipient of the De Valois Trust Fund Choreographers’ Award. He graduated into The Royal Ballet in 2005 and was promoted to First Artist in 2008. His repertory as a dancer included “Peter Rabbit†(Tales of Beatrix Potter), “Vicar/The March Hare†(Alice's Adventures in Wonderland) and roles in Swan Lake, The Prince of the Pagodas, and La Fille mal gardée. Scarlett's works for other companies include Hinterland (2007) and Indigo Children (2008) for Ballet Black, Gargoyles for New York City Ballet (2009), Viscera (2012) and Euphotic (2013) for Miami City Ballet (also designed by Scarlett), Promenade Sentimentale for K-Ballet (2013), Serpent for BalletBoyz: The Talent (2013) and No Man's Land for English National Ballet (2014).



Wayne McGregor (Choreographer). English choreographer Wayne McGregor was appointed Resident Choreographer of The Royal Ballet in 2006, becoming the first contemporary choreographer to hold the post. His many works for The Royal Ballet include Raven Girl (2013), Ambar (2012), ‘Machina’ (part of Metamorphosis: Titian 2012), Carbon Life (2012), Live Fire Exercise (2011), Limen (2009), Infra (2008), Nimbus (2007), Chroma (2006), Engram (2005), Qualia (2003) and Symbiont(s) (2001). He directed and choreographed Dido and Aeneas and Acis and Galatea (2009) for The Royal Ballet and The Royal Opera. He curated Deloitte Ignite 2008 and directs Draft Works, an annual celebration of developing choreographic talent within the Company. McGregor was born in Stockport, England and studied at Bretton Hall, West Yorkshire, and the José Limón School, New York. In 1992 he founded Wayne McGregor | Random Dance, now a resident company of Sadler's Wells. His interest in cross-discipline collaboration has seen him work across dance, film, music, visual art, technology and science. McGregor has created works for Paris Opera Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, Stuttgart Ballet, New York City Ballet, Australian Ballet, ENB, NDT1 and Rambert, among others. His works are also in the repertories of leading companies including the Bolshoi, Royal Danish Ballet, Boston Ballet and Joffrey Ballet. He has directed movement for theatre and film, including Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and music videos, including the Grammy-nominated Lotus Flower for Radiohead. In 2012 McGregor delivered a TED talk on the choreographic process and in 2014 presented the exhibition Thinking with the Body at the Welcome Collection. He was appointed a CBE in 2011.



The Joyce Theater Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization, has proudly served the dance community and its audiences for three decades. The founders, Cora Cahan and Eliot Feld, acquired and renovated the Elgin Theater in Chelsea, which opened as The Joyce Theater in 1982. The Joyce Theater is named in honor of Joyce Mertz, beloved daughter of LuEsther T. Mertz. It was LuEsther’s clear, undaunted vision and abundant generosity that made it imaginable and ultimately possible to build the theater. One of the only theaters built by dancers for dance, The Joyce Theater has provided an intimate and elegant home for more than 320 domestic and international companies. The Joyce has also commissioned more than 130 new dances since 1992. In 2009, The Joyce opened Dance Art New York (DANY) Studios to provide affordable studios for rehearsals, auditions, classes, and workshops for independent choreographers, non-profit dance companies, and the dance/theater communities. New York City public school students and teachers annually benefit from The Joyce’s Dance Education Program, and adult audiences get closer to dance through informative Dance Talks and post-performance Dance Chat discussions. The Joyce Theater now features an annual season of approximately 48 weeks with over 340 performances for audiences in excess of 135,000.



The Royal Ballet, based at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, is Great Britain’s most prestigious ballet company and one of the great classical ballet companies of the world. Led by Director Kevin O’Hare, the Company has a wide-ranging repertory that showcases the great 19th century classics alongside heritage works including those of its two great 20th century choreographers, Frederick Ashton and Kenneth MacMillan. In addition, The Royal Ballet performs new works by Royal Ballet Resident Choreographer Wayne McGregor and Royal Ballet Artistic Associate Christopher Wheeldon, two of the foremost international choreographers of today. The Royal Ballet continues to create and encourage new choreography and appointed Liam Scarlett as Royal Ballet Artist in Residence in 2012.



The Joyce Theater presents The Royal Ballet of London at the David H. Koch Theater from June 23 – 28. The engagement opens wwith a Gala performance of Frederick Ashton’s The Dream on Tuesday, June 23 at 6:30pm. Program One (The Dream / Song of the Earth) will be Wednesday, June 24 & Thursday, June 25at7:30pm and Friday, June 26 at 8pm; Program Two (The Age of Anxiety / Highlights from The Royal Ballet’s repertory / Infra) will be Saturday, June 27 at 2pm & 8pm and Sunday, June 28 at 2pm & 8pm. Tickets, ranging in price from $35-$150, can be purchased through www.DavidHKochTheater.com or by calling (212)-496-0600. Please note: ticket prices are subject to change. For more information, please visit www.Joyce.org.



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Major foundation support for Joyce Theater Presentations at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater has been provided by the Ford Foundation, The Howard Gilman Foundation, and The Pasculano Foundation. Major individual support has been provided by David Herro and Jay Franke. Additional major individual support has been provided by Kerry Clayton and Paige Royer. Additional major corporate support has been provided by First Republic Bank.



Leadership support for The Joyce Theater 2014–20015 season has been received from the LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trust. Major support has been provided by the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, and The Shubert Foundation. Additional major support has been provided by The Harkness Foundation for Dance, Northern Trust, The Jerome Robbins Foundation, The SHS Foundation, and the Windhover Foundation.



The Joyce’s presenting initiative at the David H. Koch Theater is supported by a grant award from the National Endowment for the Arts; and made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; as well as supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

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The management's decisions on what to tour and who to cast often seem decidedly odd. Last year the company took Manon to Moscow and certainly did not show their best casts.There is more than a bit of that on this tour too. I wonder whether O'Hare naturally lacks a good eye when it comes to casting or whether his inability to identify the right dancer for a particular role is attributable to spending too many years working in a company which is forced to engage in compromise casting because of its size?

The mixed bill with divertisements will give you a great opportunity to see a significant part of the company .It will be interesting to read what you think about the works and the dancers.It is a great pity that you are getting to see so little of Muntagirov who is bringing you his gala" party piece" Beau Gosse. He almost persuaded me that I wanted to see the entire Train Bleu when he danced it a couple of years ago

The Double Bill has some strange casting. The Dream has a reasonable cast on first night but the second cast of Osipova and Golding surprises me.It is as if O'Hare is more concerned about showing off his "star" dancer than what the performances will look like. Osipova will probably be better as Titania than last year because she has danced a few more Ashton roles but I do not see how Golding will have transformed his laboured, lumbering account of Oberon. He is just too big and slow to do justice to a role created on the young Dowell. The role should look light and mercurial which it does if it is danced sufficiently quickly but it looks heavy and ponderous if it is danced slowly and Golding could only manage slow last year.. We were only saved from being forced to endure him in Symphonic Variations this season, he was announced as appearing in every performance, because of last minute changes to the casting which everyone here assumes were required by the owner of the ballet rather than by management having a last minute change of mind.

The cast for Song of the Earth is equally perplexing.The first night cast spares you Soares but it includes Nunez who brings very little to the role of the woman she is rather superficial in it. Morera in the second night cast brings far more to it and that cast has the benefit of Ed Watson. as the Messenger of Death.I can make no comment on the third cast Cuthbertson and Pennefather who are due to dance in it at the end of the Covent Garden season.Then there is the slight problem of the corps getting to grips with it. There seem to be rather a lot of newcomers to the ballet which has made the first run of performances a bit like an extended series of open rehearsals.

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Having seen the SL of Golding and Osipova on film, this is not a great partnership.

Also, why would they bring Carousel pdd when they are aware that NYCB does it too. Someohow I don't imagine Carlos Acosta as Billy Bigelow, especially after seeing Damian Woetzel in the role.

Any ideas on who will be cast as Puck in the Dream?

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Valentino Zucchetti, James Hay and Paul Kay all dance Puck. Zucchetti is injured at the moment but he was first cast in the past two runs,

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