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Friday, November 8


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#1 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 02:52 PM

A feature on Cleveland Inner City Ballet, with slide show.

Ford-White’s Cleveland Inner City Ballet, previously Hough Dance School, got its start in 2004 after prompting by the late Cleveland councilwoman Fannie Lewis.

 

“I started looking around and I realized that there weren’t really any professionally taught [and affordable] ballet classes in the Cleveland area,” says Ford-White.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 02:54 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre's "The Tempest" by "B.D." in The Economist's blog.

 

Mr Ratmansky has been busily adding to his oeuvre. But not every work is stellar. Frequently his creations are affecting but ephemeral, full of passages with unmemorable steps. In his story-ballets, the dancing feels secondary to the plot. His contemporary pieces can be wonderfully atmospheric (like his "Middle Duet" from 1998), but forgettable for the same reason. “The Tempest” suffers this shortcoming: all the movements blur together.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:01 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

 

The ballet, seen at the Metropolitan Opera House last spring, is arrestingly alive at the Koch Theater, where the details are more piquant. Mr. Côté is an inspiring Beliaev, at once innocent and debonair; that duality gives his body and spirit a springy resilience, as if he’s dancing on moss. Ms. Kent, reprising Natalia, is in her element, showing how effortlessly acting and dancing — her point-work sharpening as the ballet wore on — can slip into the same shadow. Because it existed just beneath the surface, her rage, sadness and misery were harrowingly brittle.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:03 PM

A review of ABT by Carla Escoda in The Huffington Post.

It was a good thing that American Ballet Theatre fielded Roman Zhurbin in the role on Wednesday evening ("Limón would have approved," the gentleman connoisseur conceded.)

 

A standout on ABT's deep bench of dancer-actor talent, Zhurbin tore up the stage as Othello, the jealous, then conscience-stricken, Moor with an anger management problem. Manipulated by a coolly frightening Cory Stearns in the role of Iago, with help from a conniving, seductive Veronika Part as Emilia, Zhurbin transfixed the house with his growing torment in this 20-minute distillation of the Shakespeare tragedy.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:10 PM

Letters to the editor of The Washington Post re: the paper's review of Washington Ballet's 'Giselle.'

 

....The Nov. 2 review of “Giselle” did not mention music at all, which in itself is peculiar for ballet criticism. If the performance was accompanied by an orchestra (or piano), not mentioning that fact made the review unfair to the Washington Ballet. If canned music was used, not mentioning it was unfair to readers.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:16 PM

A preview of Matthew Bourne's "Sleeping Beauty" by Celia Wren in The Washington Post.

As for “Sleeping Beauty,” Bourne says for a long while he was “put off” by the tale. Charles Perrault’s late 17th-century version of the story was the basis for the original 1890 ballet, choreographed by Marius Petipa to Tchaikovsky’s music. But Bourne found that narrative unsatisfying.

 

“I said to myself, ‘Well, it doesn’t have a great love story: The prince comes on very late in the ballet and just wakes her up, and then they get married. That’s more or less it,’ ” he says. “Not a great story.”

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:23 PM

A story on the trial in Moscow of Pavel Dmitrichenko and two others by Kathy Lally in The Age.

After Filin spoke, Dmitrichenko rose in the metal cage where he was confined with two other defendants. He looked pale. He had been writing on a sheaf of papers as Filin gave evidence, shaking his head in disagreement now and then. He had questions for Filin, he said, and the judge gave her assent.

 

The dancer, who had been reading over several photocopied pages with some passages highlighted in pink, stood up and looked at Filin, a few metres away. He cited evidence of Filin having had sexual relationships with several ballerinas and conflicts with other dancers over roles and their job performance.

 


 



#8 dirac

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 12:33 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times

 

The ballet, seen at the Metropolitan Opera House last spring, is arrestingly alive at the Koch Theater, where the details are more piquant. Mr. Côté is an inspiring Beliaev, at once innocent and debonair; that duality gives his body and spirit a springy resilience, as if he’s dancing on moss. Ms. Kent, reprising Natalia, is in her element, showing how effortlessly acting and dancing — her point-work sharpening as the ballet wore on — can slip into the same shadow. Because it existed just beneath the surface, her rage, sadness and misery were harrowingly brittle.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 02:45 PM

A CBC News story on the Bolshoi Ballet's season opening. Video.

 

CBC's Jean-Francois Belanger reports how  the incident has lifted the lid on the dark and murky world inside the Bolshoi with tales of rivalry, jealousy, cronyism and widespread corruption.

 




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