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Friday, November 1


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#1 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:28 AM

Dance Theatre of Harlem's Toronto engagement is canceled.

 

But Edward Schoelwer, the troupe’s tour booking representative, tells a different story. He says he was told the Sony was cancelling the show because of low ticket sales.


“I understand they are under great pressure to pay the bills, and I guess they have a marketing benchmark and they thought it was prudent to cancel,” says Schoelwer.



#2 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:31 AM

Two previews of Ballet Idaho's performances this weekend.

 

Idaho Press

 

“Akimbo” is a study in sensuality and the balletic form. Originally created for New York City Ballet principal dancer Albert Evans, the ballet is comprised of five movements set to music for string quartet.

 

 

Idaho Statesman

 

“Akimbo” is one of two new ballets — the other by company member Daniel Ojeda — that will balance the return of last season’s stunning “Serenade,” one of George Balanchine’s masterworks, and artistic director Peter Anastos’ 1940s-style comic ballet “Footage.”

 


 


#3 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:34 AM

Q&A with Diana Albrecht of Boston Ballet.

 

The Tech: How did you prepare for your roles in La Bayadère?

 

Diana Albrecht: The Kingdom of Shades is one of the most challenging parts for the corps of ballet. We started rehearsals back in August and slowly increased the amount of arabesques [lift of the leg behind the back] each day in order to gain strength and avoid hurting our backs since we do around 40 arabesques consecutively.



#4 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:35 AM

A review of Boston Ballet by Angelique Nehmzow and Grace Young for The Tech, MIT's campus paper.

 

The final act, The Kingdom of the Shades, is one of the most celebrated excerpts in all of classical ballet. The Boston Ballet performs to perfection. In Solor’s dream, twenty-four dancers in white tutus descend diagonally onto the stage in a repetitive sequence of arabesques. By the end of the act, they have performed at least a hundred arabesques each. The ensemble is visually stunning, and almost hypnotic. The soloists (Kathleen Breen Combes, Ashley Ellis, and Misa Kuranaga) truly shine in what artistic director Mikko Nissinen describes as “notoriously demanding” roles. The pace quickens towards the end, as Nikiya and Solor have their final, cathartic, duet, and he twirls her in midair. The two are fearlessly athletic in their passionate dance, but also happy and finally at peace.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:37 AM

A feature on Springfield Ballet Company.

While SBC has a repertoire of fairytale-themed ballets through which it cycles about every five years, “The Nutcracker” remains an annual production. As it readies its 39th rendition of the famous holiday ballet, SBC relies on a multitude of volunteers and skill sets to spin the production to its fullest measure. The performance boasts an average of 120 local children and adults — many from families who have been involved for years — company dancers and professional guest artists, and at least as many volunteers.

 


#6 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:38 AM

A preview of Australian Ballet's Bodytorque program.

 

Highlights are Topp’s “Tinted Windows”, a breathtaking performance with romantic costumes by Toni Maticevski. Principal artist King-Wall’s “The Art of War” is also sure to please critics and crowds alike with an exciting mix of styles blended with the Brazilian martial art of capoeira. Each piece successfully pushes the bounds of what seems physically possible for the dancers while remaining elegant and entertaining until the night’s end.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:43 AM

A story on the Filin affair and recent related events by Ismene Brown for The Arts Desk.

 

Tsiskaridze appeared preternaturally calm about his unemployed status; there was a comic moment when from far north in Yakutsk, an almost permanently frozen Siberian city officially termed Russia’s coldest, came the offer to direct the local ballet company, if only they could afford him. It was never on. Tsiskaridze, as he said in several interviews, was the Bolshoi, and bolshoi means big, the biggest. It now appears he already knew what his next job would be.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:54 AM

A review of the Australian Ballet's Bodytorque program by Deborah Jones in The Australian.

 

Five of the six new works paid such homage to established choreographers you'd think royalties would be in order. But for all the sense there isn't a huge amount of originality in movement language, there is a consistently high standard in the work, probably more than in any other year of Bodytorque's decade-long history. It gives the audience an extremely enjoyable and accomplished evening of dance and the program has consistency and coherence.

 


#9 Alexandra

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 02:40 PM

A review of the Berlin Ballet's "Nutcracker" on her danceviewtimes blog:

 

http://danceviewtime...ilona_landgraf/

 

Despite the amazingly mild weather so far, State Ballet Berlin's premiere of its new “Nutcracker” heralded an early start for this year's Christmas sea­son. Vladimir Malakhov, in his last year as artistic director of the company, decided to replace Patrice Bart's production - which had been in repertory from 1999 until two years ago -  with one based on St.Petersburg's 1892 original. Entrusted with the choreography were Russia's Yuri Burlaka and Vasily Medvedev, both familiar with their homeland's ballet tradition. Neither of them is unknown in Berlin, having staged an adaption of “La Esmeralda” for the State Ballet in 2011.

A huge spectacle, more splendid, more fairytale-like and magical than ever - those were the superlatives with which Malakhov advertised this “Nutcracker”. Was it to be his proud parting gift (and certainly no cheap one) after his more than ten years tenure?



#10 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:26 AM

A review of the Washington Ballet in "Giselle" by Sarah Halzack in The Washington Post.  Thanks to YouOverThere for sending in the link!

 

The first act, however, lacked some of the persuasiveness of the second. Onuki wasn’t quite as believable as a gushy, fragile young woman of the earthly world. Her flirty gestures to Albrecht seemed a little put-on, and her carriage and movement were almost too assured, offering no foreshadowing of her forthcoming meltdown. (It should be noted, though, that Onuki was brilliant in the scene of her death, descending into a crazy-eyed, loose-limbed despair and madness that was so raw it almost made you want to turn away.)

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:34 AM

Tiler Peck talks about appearing in the new AOL web series, "city.ballet."

 

“I think ballet should be a little mysterious, but we need to expose ourselves to draw people in,” says Peck, a top-ranked principal with the company at age 24. “It isn’t boring, like how I thought when I was young. I want people to see how much work and how much discipline it takes.”

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:36 AM

A review of the Milwaukee Ballet by Elaine Schmidt in the Journal Sentinel.

 

Such a richly detailed, floor-to-fly-space set, elegantly wrought, character-defining costumes, paired with a live, Milwaukee Ballet Orchestra performance of Prokofiev's stirring score could easily overwhelm the intimate, wrenching story of two star-crossed young lovers.

 

But it doesn't.


 


#13 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:37 AM

A review of Keigwin & Company by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

 

More successful is the other New York premiere, “Canvas,” a breezy group work set to a piano quintet by Adam Crystal. On opening night, four New York City Ballet dancers — Tiler Peck, Robert Fairchild, Daniel Ulbricht and Lauren Lovette — joined six from Mr. Keigwin’s troupe.

 

In this brisk dance, more than a little reminiscent of Paul Taylor and Jerome Robbins, a simple walk conveys infectious innocence; no matter how complicated his crossings become, Mr. Keigwin returns to pedestrian motions — walking, skipping, jumping — to impart ebullience.

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:41 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet in 'Cinderella' by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

 

...Equally tall and blond, Sarah Van Patten as Cinderella was too big for a role that cries out for a soubrette. But neither of them was helped by their choreography, full of sharp angles and slides to the floor. And although Wheeldon did a beautiful job of setting the stage for the pas de deux,both classical adagios were two-dimensional and constricting, rather than resonant expressions of transcendence and love triumphant. The production, overstuffed like a Thanksgiving turkey, tried too hard. The effort expended to reexamine the tale of Cinderella  swamped a danceable story and its universal theme.

 

 



#15 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:52 AM

A review of Carlos Acosta's novel "Pig's Foot" by Peter Carty in The Independent.

 

Acosta's translator Frank Wynne captures the energy of Acosta's prose with meticulous and sustained flair. As for Acosta himself, if his style is occasionally uneven, no matter: he drags his story relentlessly onward, in much the same manner as the infant Oscar with his dead moggy. This knockabout epic marks an impressive further stage in Acosta's emergence as a writer.

 

 




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