Jump to content


Tsis≠karidze & Lopatk≠ina at the Vag≠an≠ova Bal≠let Academy


  • Please log in to reply
201 replies to this topic

#91 tamicute

tamicute

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 84 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 01:58 PM

...and it's inconceivable that one would be the leader of such an important organization and no-one ever breathe a word of criticism...

I remember reading a report on this site when Gergiev criticized Vaganova, but can you provide the link to what you found, pertaining to criticism from several years ago. I would like to read it and your knowledge in finding these links, greatly surpasses mine.

Thank you very much



#92 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,150 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:19 PM

Just a reminder for official sources only, which doesn't include other discussion boards.

#93 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 05:06 PM

Also, isn't creating the need for new expenditures for repairs/modifications/redesigns (necessary or not) -- isn't that what corruption is? or at least, mismanagement?

Yes, but corruption, in the form of payment or taking of money, as I stated, does not explain "sufficiently" the punitive behavior toward the ballet and school, nor does it preclude the creation of a well-designed, useful building, suited to its purpose. It adds to costs and delays, and may cause moral, economic, and other types of harm, but it does not explain sufficiently the design of a nonfunctional building. If a builder did not use sufficiently safe material to permit the diversion of allocated money to his or someone else's pockets, then corruption would be a sufficient explanation (e.g., designing a smaller space, built with inferior or fewer materials, to permit skimming and diversion of budgeted monies for stronger, costlier materials). But if a building to house a school does not have classrooms, then corruption alone is not a sufficient explanation for the senseless design, although it is likely a factor.

Likewise, the above claim that Gergiev favors the opera and treats ballet as a slave, does not sufficiently explain the intentional creation of a space that lacks studios to permit the training of dancers who are the cash cows whose slave labor funds the beloved opera. One must still build a barn to house the horses who draw the carriages, even if one does not adequately or completely feed the horses.

#94 solo

solo

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:12 PM

Quote:
“… Islom Baimuradov stated at the time, "why wasn't the ballet administration consulted ... in what was needed in terms of rehearsal space?"

Islom Baimuradov could better ask his own boss - the head of the ballet company: what was the ballet administration doing during all those seven years? Why couldn’t they demand that the ballet company’ requirements are taken into account?

Quote:
“… it is his devotion to the old Bolshoi style and Grigorovitch (If I understand from afar) that seems a bad choice for the Maryinski's school.”

Why will devotion to Grigorovich be bad for the school? It should not be forgotten that Yuri Grigorovich graduated in 1946 from Leningrad Choreographic School renamed later after A.Vaganova. He danced at Kirov Theatre for 10 years, choreographed ballet scenes there in 5 operas and created his fill-length ballets - “The Stone Flower” and “The Legend of Love”. The latter is considered by some as his best ballet and is still in the Mariinsky Ballet’s repertoir.

#95 Amy Reusch

Amy Reusch

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,761 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:55 PM

Thanks, solo, for opening my mind.

#96 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,150 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 07:36 PM

Quote:
“… Islom Baimuradov stated at the time, "why wasn't the ballet administration consulted ... in what was needed in terms of rehearsal space?"

Islom Baimuradov could better ask his own boss - the head of the ballet company: what was the ballet administration doing during all those seven years? Why couldn’t they demand that the ballet company’ requirements are taken into account?

 
When a project is started, there's a project sponsor, and if the project sponsor indicates that a certain group's requirements are out-of-scope, usually those requirements aren't discussed or their input sought.  The head of the ballet company reports to Gergiev, and if Gergiev made it clear that the ballet was not to be consulted, the ballet would not be consulted.  Mr. Baimuradov's boss possibly could have gone over Mr. Gergiev's head, but that only works if someone over Gergiev was ready to listen.
 
 

But if a building to house a school does not have classrooms, then corruption alone is not a sufficient explanation for the senseless design, although it is likely a factor.

I'm not saying that the reason for the lack of studio space for the ballet was corruption: from David Remnick's article on the Filin attack in The New Yorker,
 
 

[Alexander] Budberg [“a man of business, who is married to Natalya Timakova, one of Medvedev’s closest aides"] was forthright about the rebuilding of the Bolshoi. The Russian press has reported that the six-year project—which rescued the foundation, doubled the size of the complex, improved the acoustics, and modernized its stage—ran well over its initial cost projections. Indeed, according to an official audit, the costs were sixteen times as high. Budberg himself estimated the bill at nearly a billion dollars, and volunteered that, especially in the early years, many millions went to shady contractors, inspectors, venders, and bureaucrats.
 
Budberg talked about a contractor who was involved early on in the project. He smirked. “The guy was a crook,” he said. “But he didn’t have the scale to steal on a huge scale! He stole what he could, but he couldn’t steal enough! A lot of money that was budgeted was still there. So we were lucky. We got it done.”
 
This was Russia. Only the naïve flinch at brazen corruption. When I asked another member of the board of trustees about bribes, thievery, and waste at the Bolshoi, he shrugged. We were at a café near the theatre that was a hangout for dancers, models, and the businessmen who love them. The board member was shocked no more by the notion of financial malfeasance than he was by the fact that the young woman at the next table was evidently applying manual pleasure to her date.


However, it is possible for the crooks to have the "scale to steal on a huge scale," and corruption alone could explain it, in that if corruption drains enough resources, and because the resources are constrained, scope suffers.

I do think that the ballet's needs were not taken into consideration because they had whatever facilities existed in the Main theater and Gergiev was counting on using the school for the main company during the renovation of the building. A renovation of the Main theater did not just pop into someone's head recently.
 

Likewise, the above claim that Gergiev favors the opera and treats ballet as a slave, does not sufficiently explain the intentional creation of a space that lacks studios to permit the training of dancers who are the cash cows whose slave labor funds the beloved opera. One must still build a barn to house the horses who draw the carriages, even if one does not adequately or completely feed the horses.

Dorofeeva did not say that Gergiev was planning the throw the ballet out onto the street: it's a question of being ousted from their premises because they're convenient to the ballet, which is generating the revenue. I'm sure Gergiev will find a barn to put them in.

It will be interesting, because if they're taking in paying students, I'm not sure how happy the high-paying parents will feel about their children taking classes in the new barn, instead of the venerable old one.

#97 Catherine

Catherine

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 183 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:12 PM

 

 

Mr. Baimuradov's boss possibly could have gone over Mr. Gergiev's head, but that only works if someone over Gergiev was ready to listen.

Or, if said boss is willing to risk being fired for going against Gergiev, which, as we know, he is not.

Also, think: who's above Gergiev? smile.png

 

 

 

because if they're taking in paying students,

Yes - they have been taking in paying students for years.

 

 

 

Why couldn’t they demand that the ballet company’ requirements are taken into account?

You can (they can) demand. It just doesn't mean that it will happen.

 

I am reminded of one other key factor here. The dates for finishing the new theatre (completing construction) were moved out numerous times. The entire outfit was woefully behind schedule and delayed more than 1 year (if memory serves - initial completion was supposed to be in 2011). As it was, there were doubts about how it could make the May 1-2-3/Maestro's birthday bash deadline in 2013 given the fact that, even in spring 2013, it was not finished. For that matter, at the opening, it was still not finished. Even this summer, walking through areas in the lower floors: still not finished!
So, even if consultations were made, and reassurances given, no one was able to see the outcome until what was done was done. Most dancers I spoke with had not even seen the inside of that building until perhaps a week or so before the opening (maybe 2 weeks). At that point, of course, it was too late to request that adequate studio space be built...

 

 

Also, isn't creating the need for new expenditures for repairs/modifications/redesigns (necessary or not) -- isn't that what corruption is? or at least, mismanagement?

Yes, but corruption, in the form of payment or taking of money, as I stated, does not explain "sufficiently" the punitive behavior toward the ballet and school, nor does it preclude the creation of a well-designed, useful building, suited to its purpose. It adds to costs and delays, and may cause moral, economic, and other types of harm, but it does not explain sufficiently the design of a nonfunctional building. If a builder did not use sufficiently safe material to permit the diversion of allocated money to his or someone else's pockets, then corruption would be a sufficient explanation (e.g., designing a smaller space, built with inferior or fewer materials, to permit skimming and diversion of budgeted monies for stronger, costlier materials). But if a building to house a school does not have classrooms, then corruption alone is not a sufficient explanation for the senseless design, although it is likely a factor.

Likewise, the above claim that Gergiev favors the opera and treats ballet as a slave, does not sufficiently explain the intentional creation of a space that lacks studios to permit the training of dancers who are the cash cows whose slave labor funds the beloved opera. One must still build a barn to house the horses who draw the carriages, even if one does not adequately or completely feed the horses.

 

I see your points now... that corruption alone can't explain the (perhaps intentional, perhaps not) lack of space. I suppose we've already touched on the basic reasoning behind it all smile.png



#98 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,150 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:16 PM

but it does not explain sufficiently the design of a nonfunctional building.

Is there any evidence that the opera complaining? Is it a non-functional building from their point of view?

#99 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 07:41 AM

 

but it does not explain sufficiently the design of a nonfunctional building.

Is there any evidence that the opera complaining? Is it a non-functional building from their point of view?

 

I suppose if the opera depends on the ballet for its funding, then the inability of the ballet to function in the space would preclude the ballet from working and thereby supporting the opera, making the space ultimately unsuited for its intended use.  The house of cards collapses if level 2 is excluded and level 1 has no foundation upon which to rest.



#100 puppytreats

puppytreats

    Gold Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 751 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 07:43 AM

 what was the ballet administration doing during all those seven years? Why couldn’t they demand that the ballet company’ requirements are taken into account?

 

Ample possible explanations exist:

1. lack of power

2. threats

3. fear

4. extortion

5. politics

6. corruption

7. training ballet dancers to be silent, obey, not ask questions, not defy authority

8. futility

9. they did make demands but were not successful



#101 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,150 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 08:03 AM

Has the Mariinsky ballet shut down or stopped performing since the Mariinsky II was built? Of course not: the've used the studio that does exist and the Main theater's studios. Not providing 100% of all functions does not mean the M-II is not functional: it means it has specific functions that don't include rehearsal space for the ballet, just as PNB has a separate building, the Phelps Center, for the school and Company studios, and the Opera has its own rehearsal studios. No one would think of calling McCaw Hall non-functional because it lacked studio space.

Why would a building be specced to accommodate a rare reno period? Not having space in the Mariinsky II does not mean no space. While I'd expect touring to increase -- the M-II could have a hundred ballet studios, but not be able to use them if they're in Paris or Berkeley -- in fact Dorofeeva doesn't believe this is so: she believes that the Mariinsky ballet will take over the school studios.

Do you think the school will shut itself down during the renos, if the Maroinsky takes over the school studios during the reno? I find that highly unlikely, and I don't think it's a stretch that another space with high enough ceilings will be found either for the school or the company or to be shared by both and outfitted with barres and floors.

#102 volcanohunter

volcanohunter

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 09:53 AM

Just the other day Vladimir Medinsky announced that the Moscow Ballet School would soon begin construction on an additional building, including a dormitory--primarily to accommodate foreign students--and a swimming pool. While he was at it, he mentioned that the Vaganova dorm was also in need of reconstruction and renovation, to begin at the end of 2014.

 

http://riarealty.ru/...534706903286978



#103 abatt

abatt

    Sapphire Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,622 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 10:10 AM

NY Times is now reporting on this topic today, and mentions that Ratmansky has blasted the appointment of NT in a terse statement on his Facebook page. No love loss there.  Wasn't NT a major thorn in Ratmansky's side during Ratmansky's tenure as leader of the Bolshoi.



#104 canbelto

canbelto

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,877 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 11:13 AM

There is now a public petition:

 

http://www.onlinepet...–≥–į–Ĺ–ĺ–≤–ĺ–Ļ-



#105 solo

solo

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 02:26 PM

Quote:
“Ample possible explanations exist…”

I completely agree, puppytreats. My question about “what was the ballet administration doing during all those seven years” was purely rhetoric.

The failure of the Mariinsky’s ballet administration to champion the company’s rights and requirements proved again that Gergiev made it completely rightless. Mariinsky Theatre lives under totalitarian regime and, unfortunately, the great ballet company suffers from it.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):