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Saturday, October 26


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#1 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 05:51 AM

A review of the Boston Ballet in "La Bayadere" by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe.

The “white” third act, Solor’s opium dream, begins with the Entrance of the Shades, who descend a zigzag ramp in a slow, hypnotic alternation of arabesques and backbends.

Both the 24 women and the Boston Ballet Orchestra under Jonathan McPhee sustained a singing line over the nearly 10 minutes. There was great technique on display from the three solo Shades: Ashley Ellis made simple passé-relevé look magical, Misa Kuranaga ate up the stage with her relevé-élancé arabesque run, and Kathleen Breen Combes showed off creamy cabrioles.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 05:59 AM

An interview with Carlos Acosta about the writing of "Pig's Foot."

 

He cites as his fictional influences a formidable list: Camus; Márquez; the Cuban novelist Pedro Juan Gutiérrez, author of the Dirty Havana trilogy; the Mexican Juan Rulfo; Roberto Bolaño; and Haruki Murakami. Not that he sees himself in their league. “I understand my limits. What I want to do is just old-fashioned storytelling, to produce some hours or weeks of escapism from this world. With that I would be very satisfied.”

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:00 AM

A review of the book by the same writer, Jane Shilling, for The Telegraph.

 

Acosta is not as graceful a stylist on the page as he is on the stage, but he is a lively storyteller, and the magical realist influence of García Márquez et al comes in handy for skipping over the odd structural inelegance (“I’m the narrator and… anyone who doesn’t like it can f--- off,” as Oscar remarks). The final twist is clumsily done, but in Frank Wynne’s skilful translation, Acosta’s novel has an earthy charm that makes it more than a mere literary curiosity.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:04 AM

Edward Watson appears in a new music video with The Feeling. Link to video included. 

 

"Initially, I wasn't sure about Ed being filmed singing, but then I thought I would see what happened and how it looked," said Dan Gillespie Sells, singer with The Feeling. "It was bizarre seeing someone miming to my lyric."

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:05 AM

The Grand Rapids Ballet Company presents "Dracula."

 

Alabama Ballet debuted the ballet in 1997 in an old vaudeville house in Birmingham, Ala. Grand Rapids Ballet gives six performances in its Peter Martin Wege Theatre with lights, video and special effects to create an otherworldly place.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:07 AM

A BBC News video story with dancers of the Birmingham Royal Ballet talking about the intersection of mime and dance.

 

In the Birmingham Royal Ballet's production, Marion Tait is the wicked fairy Carabosse. She uses mime to convey her anger at not being invited to the to the christening of Princess Aurora, and vows that one day the Princess shall prick her finger and die.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:13 AM

A review of the English National Ballet by Louise Levene in The Telegraph.

 

Anna-Marie Holmes’s staging is an improvement on her American Ballet Theatre version seen at the London Coliseum in 2009. The love interest doesn’t quite convince as yet, and the shipwreck ending falls slightly flat with Conrad in a state of collapse and Ali washed overboard. “Couldn’t they have gone back for him?” wondered the old dear behind me.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:41 PM

A review of the Cincinnati Ballet and Ballet Met Columbus' co-production of "Swan Lake" by David Lyman in The Cincinnati Enquirer.

 

Now they’ve done it again. And to up the ante, they now have the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra – 60 members of it, at least – in the Aronoff Center pit with maestro Carmon DeLeone. It’s an impressive addition, as the CSO is larger and, thanks to working together 52 weeks a year, a more unified ensemble than the ballet’s own orchestra.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:43 PM

A review of Barak Ballet by Wiebke Schuster for Neon Tommy.

 

Barak herself is the soloist of “Loose Gravel." She crouches and skids along the floor like a mermaid or a broken doll. Clad only a skin-colored unitard with her hazelnut brown hair loose, her gaze remains vague. Only the her feet give away her identity: the way she peels her toes and makes her bones undulate to find a flexed foot position make it clear—she is a ballet dancer. Each movement is minute, intricate and intimate. The piece by contemporary choreographer Danielle Agami is a sketch, an experiment for Barak to re-invent herself and find new directions. It is an open invitation to return to the essence of where it all started: the motivation to lift-off and discover standing, walking, dancing anew.

 




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