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Friday, October 18


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8 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 10:55 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

In seeking to reinvigorate academic dancing, “Classical Symphony” (2010), by the company’s resident choreographer, Yuri Possokhov, is neither as fluent as “From Foreign Lands” nor as original as “Beaux.” Its torso undulations are the kind of unthinking update that cheapens ballet. But the work has verve, drive and invention.

 

 

Robert Johnson's review in The Star-Ledger.

 

McGregor’s style is typically disjointed, with shoulders wrenched backward, torsos slouching and legs rigid in improbable splits. Yet, perhaps because of his work with ballet dancers, McGregor’s choreography seems less fussy than in the past. Here he paints with broad strokes, mining "Borderlands" with delicious surprises as he breaks up a quartet and stations dancers against the side-walls of a dazzlingly illuminated box.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 10:58 AM

A review of Dance Theatre of Harlem by Sarah Halzack in The Washington Post.

“Gloria,” choreographed by Robert Garland, is a tribute to Harlem’s traditions of spirituality and is set to the Francis Poulenc score by the same name.

 

The music is nothing if not grand, from its first moments when an assertive blast of brass instruments seems as if it should herald the arrival of a high priest. The dancers largely rose to meet its heights, bounding across the stage with gallant skips and managing to project lightness even as they dug their heels into the floor. However, their musicality needed fine-tuning, as most of the work’s many grand jetes hit their zenith a count too early or late.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:02 AM

Oregon Ballet Theatre hires a new leader for its school.

 

A native of Minneapolis, [Anthony] Jones received training at the National Ballet School in Toronto and at New York's School of American Ballet, affiliated with New York City Ballet. From 1990 to 1996, Jones danced with Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle and rose to the rank of soloist in such works as "The Four Temperaments," "Swan Lake," "Romeo and Juliet" and "Cinderella."

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:06 AM

An interview with Lourdes Lopez.

At 55, looking at least a decade younger, López exudes quiet authority as she discusses her plans. Miami City Ballet has boasted from the get-go a unique and thrilling Balanchine style, and that remains its main strength. Still, dance companies are like people: they get better or they get worse, but they never, ever stay the same. MCB may well get better.

 

"The school had no syllabus when I got here," says López. "It has one now." She is both discreet and fair about her predecessor, who "trained dancers beautifully in the Balanchine repertory, the height and the preparation -- now everyone down there at the school will get this training from levels 1 through 6."

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:12 AM

David Dawson creates his first piece for the Royal Ballet. 

Back in the Royal Opera House studio, the daring comes with a healthy dose of risk. In the blink of an eye, just as she is completing her perilous plunge, Nuñez lets out a small cry and curls up on the floor. Bonelli’s knee has knocked her neck, and the assembled team suspect a pinched nerve. The ballerina hobbles out of the room for a short break, visibly shaken. “On the plus side,” an assistant jokes as everyone files out, “It was correct. We got the lift.”

 

“I’m presenting my view of dance, of how ballet can be used as a modern art form,” says Dawson, who readily admits that he has often found the ballet world too closed in on itself.....

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:28 AM

A preview of S.F. Ballet's "Cinderella" by Jocelyn Noveck for the Associated Press.

That's just one of the intriguing variations that popular choreographer Christopher Wheeldon has made in his new "Cinderella," which hits New York's Lincoln Center next week, via the San Francisco Ballet. Here, Cinderella and the prince get to know each other a little before they even get to the ball, and Wheeldon gets to play up the parallels in their lives.

 

"I was interested in the idea that they have similar circumstances," says Wheeldon. "They meet and recognize similar qualities in each other. She's trapped in this familial environment that is vitriolic, whereas he's feeling trapped with his responsibilities. All he wants is to fall in love and be a normal guy. I thought of the royal princes today in the UK."

 


 



#7 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:33 AM

An examination of Balanchine's "The Prodigal Son" as a story of penitence by Eve Tushnet for Acculturated.com.

Here the father is more like the unjust judge in a very different parable. A widow is denied justice by this judge, but she is so persistent in her appeals that at last he gives in to her. The moral is that we should be persistent in prayer but it is not one of Jesus’ more comforting images.

 

As an image of penitence this ending does two things. First, it suggests that penitence, like prayer, can require a kind of helpless persistence, a stubbornness borne of the realization that you’ve run out of other options.....

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:22 AM

Reviews of the English National Ballet in "Le Corsaire."

 

The Guardian

 

At present, though, it is not fully focused. Absurd as its story may be, there are dramatic opportunities for romantic comedy and melodrama that need to be pointed up. Too much of the stage action is a kind of wallpaper – ballet mime – and indecisive characterisation and timing suggest the dancers need more direction. Yonah Acosta, for instance, is far more outstanding than he should be for the glinting, avaricious swagger with which he portrays Birbanto; for all the beauty of Vadim Muntagirov's dancing and partnerwork, his Conrad looks almost insipid by comparison.

 

The Telegraph

 

Anna-Marie Holmes, the former ballerina who has made recreating Le Corsaire her labour of love, uses a fairly free hand with the choreography of Petipa and Sergeyev. Yet it is notable how deliberately she has embraced the old-fashioned nature of the ballet. The creed is pile-everybody-on-stage, the score is a boom-bang-a-bang patchwork of nine different composers, and the spectacle – as realised by the superb designs of Bob Ringwood – is stunning.

 

The Independent

 

The focus on the men shifts with the arrival of Cojocaru. A world-class ballerina, she made headlines by leaving The Royal Ballet for ENB: this was her company debut. A romantic, ethereal dancer, she also has killer technique and glowing presence. She can flirt and ham with the best of them, lighting up the silly story with teasing warmth.

 

The Arts Desk

 

Muntagirov didn’t look like he was having quite so much fun - it was only in the bedroom pas de deux that he started to seem more like a man in love and less like a man very concerned not to drop his new partner. But the attraction that began to surface in that scene bodes well for both the partnership and Corsaire’s audience appeal; and Muntagirov can be relied on to execute crowd-pleasingly big jumps and turns and still land neatly on those long, classical legs.....

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:53 AM

An interview with Matthew Bourne by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

 

For another, Mr. Bourne said, the theme of good versus evil, embodied by the wicked fairy Carabosse, is sustained musically through the ballet, but not by the story. “You get this great character early on, and then she has nothing else to do,” he said. “I wanted that tension throughout the story, and asked myself, How do I keep that going?”

 

 




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