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Tuesday, October 15


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#1 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:17 PM

A review of Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre by Karen Campbell in The Boston Globe.

 

The larger sections of “Vanished Verses” don’t fare as well. The risk in choreographing to music with Bach’s exacting rhythmic impulse is that it casts irregularities of timing in sharp relief, and the company’s corps was lax. However, Mateo frankly admits in the program notes that the new work “miraculously emerged from barely two weeks of rehearsals,” so hopefully this new ballet will polish well with time. It has promise.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:21 PM

A review of a PBS broadcast of Milwaukee Ballet's "Romeo and Juliet," with Michael Pink commenting on Jennifer Homans' latest broadside, by Carla Escoda in The Huffington Post.

Pink sounded mildly exasperated. Though he agrees with Homans that much of contemporary ballet has become an exercise in bloodless pyrotechnics, he asked, unsentimentally, why we need to replace Balanchine. "There is an urgency, at the leading ballet companies, to anoint," he pointed out. "And as soon as they think they've discovered the new genius, they proclaim it so everyone can breathe a sigh of relief and carry on.

 

There are choreographers doing fascinating work, but with the current star system that has turned the top dancers and dance-makers into jet-setters, talent is no longer being cultivated in stable soil; ballet companies in turn find it difficult to grow loyal audiences with peripatetic stars popping in and out.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:23 PM

A preview of the Royal Ballet's new "Live Cinema Season" by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

The Royal Ballet has broadcast its productions sporadically for five years, but this season, thanks to an arrangement with NCM Fathom Events, the performances will be screened more widely than ever. In New Jersey, 13 movie theaters will participate; visit FathomEvents.com for more details.

 

"Don Quixote" is a new production, starring Marianela Nuñez and Carlos Acosta, the renowned Cuban virtuoso who also staged the work. "Marianela is in the prime of her career," says O’Hare. "She’s dancing and performing beautifully. Everything she touches, she does so well."

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:27 PM

A story on "city.ballet," the New York City Ballet  docudrama series coming this fall.

 

The series also stands apart from other reality shows through its honest tone and gritty, natural visuals, which are more reminiscent of an independent documentary than the typical hour-long drama. Alison Benson, Parker’s partner at Pretty Matches Productions, explains that this raw, contemporary aesthetic was absolutely intentional, representing a direct contrast to both television and traditional ballet documentaries. “We’re used to seeing the stock performance footage, and it’s gorgeous in a way, but for 40 years it’s looked the same,” she says. “You want to play against type and show something in a light that it hasn’t been shown in before.”

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:29 PM

Q&A with Roy Kaiser.

Dance Journal: ‘Jewels’ is usually done by companies with a much larger roster. Did it give you pause?

Roy Kaiser: Up until this season. (he laughs) but yes, every standing dancer is in it. But we’re all covered and really fine with it now. All of the dancers most nights will be doing at least two sections, so it stretches us that way. But, it’s incredible choreography and a musicality that drives our dancers.

 

Within a couple of days of coming back from summer break, I have to say they looked so good, not sure they felt good, because of the workout, but the entire company is performing at a high level. Of course, that just builds throughout the season.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:31 PM

Ballet West finds temporary digs in a shopping center.

 

Two new studios have been built for Ballet West’s professional company and the Ballet West Academy dancers, who rehearse there daily. Ballet West’s administrative offices have also been moved into the shopping center, at 600 South and 600 East.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:33 PM

A review of Carolina Ballet by Denise Certiglia for Triangle Arts & Entertainment.

 

Carolina Ballet gets better every season. Principal dancers like Lilyan Vigo and Richard Krusch in Raymonda Variations always represent professionalism and composure. And young fresh-faced and eager dancers with the skill to perform fast and challenging choreography are becoming more and more plentiful in the company. I usually attend the opening night performances, on Thursday, and this time I went on Friday. I don’t know if that’s the reason that I saw so many new faces dancing larger roles, but it was a treat and I look forward to seeing more of these young dancers.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:35 PM

A preview of "Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty."

 

Once Bourne completes the creative process of putting the show up, it is placed in the hands of a resident director whose job it is to make sure the performances remain faithful to Bourne’s vision. Or, as Neil Westmoreland, the resident director of the “Sleeping Beauty” tour says, “My job is to keep Matthew happy.”

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:38 PM

Boston Ballet and American Repertory Theater will collaborate on a new production.

 

 ART artistic director Diane Paulus and Boston Ballet artistic director Mikko Nissinen are working together to develop a new take on Molière’s “Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme,” to be performed at the Opera House in the spring of 2015.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:01 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Gottlieb in The New York Observer.

 

Despite all the inadequacies, Balanchine’s storytelling genius comes through: We still grasp what he’s trying to tell us about the poetry and mystery of the Romantic period. If only the dancers could grasp it. If only Martins would forget his pride and bring in the experts to clean things up. The greatest Prodigal and Sleepwalker in the company’s history, Villella and Allegra Kent, are right here in New York. That they’re not being invited to coach “their” roles is a crime against art—and against Balanchine.

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:03 PM

A review of Kansas City Ballet by Liz Cook for The Pitch.

 

The Kansas City Ballet's season opener, Fancy Free, makes a spirited introduction to Devon Carney, the institution's new artistic director. Subtitled Joy That Knows No Bounds, the five-ballet collection spans eras and styles in playful pursuit of pure delight — a delight very much in evidence last Friday.



#12 dirac

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 08:50 PM

A CBC News preview of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in "The Handmaid's Tale." Video clip.
 

The RWB production stars principal dancer Amanda Green as Offred and soloist Alexander Gamayunov as the Commander, the man with whom she is paired.

 

"The language of ballet is a physical language. I mean, it can capture emotion and translate them or transport them to the audience in ways that no other art form can do…. It says it differently, and it can say it extremely powerfully," Lewis said.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:19 AM

A preview of San Francisco Ballet's "Cinderella" and Matthew Bourne's "Sleeping Beauty" by Pia Catton in The Wall Street Journal.

Before her epic nap, Aurora develops a love interest in a local boy. "His dilemma becomes how does he stay alive for her?" said Mr. Bourne.

 

That's taken care of by a vampire bite, though there are only a few real evil creatures, as in the original. "This is a piece you could bring children to. It is a fairy tale," he said.

 

In "Cinderella," Mr. Wheeldon started with an element of the back story, in which the death of Cinderella's mother lands her with a stepmother. She visits her mother's grave, and a nearby magical tree becomes Cinderella's protector.

 

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:26 AM

A preview of S.F. Ballet's New York engagement by Gilly Lloyd in The Examiner. Photo gallery.

 

Cinderella is Christopher Wheeldon’s first full-length commission for San Francisco Ballet. A co-production with Dutch National Ballet, it’s based more on the Brothers Grimm version of the fairy tale than that of Perrault, with which we’re more familiar. There’s no pumpkin coach, no clock at midnight, and no fairy godmother. Instead, there’s a tree which grows on the grave of Cinderella’s mother, which lives and dances, and is “the deliverer of all things magic,” says Wheeldon, “which I think is more poetic and quite beautiful”. For Cinderella’s protection and guidance, Wheeldon has given her four spirits - based on the seasonal fairies in Prokofiev’s score. He has also retained the elements of comedy in the more familiar interpretation of the story - because, as he says, there’s comedy written into the music.

 




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