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Monday, October 14

10 posts in this topic

A preview of San Francisco Ballet's New York engagement by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

Mr. Tomasson spends considerable time each year traveling in order to see new work. He said that he looks for choreographers with a good knowledge of the classical vocabulary, but that he is open to different aesthetics, citing the work of William Forsythe and Mr. McGregor. Not every work gets raves, but Mr. Tomasson is phlegmatic: “You keep at it, and hopefully good ballets will pop up,” he said.

The company commissions three or four new ballets a year, on average (this season there will be premieres from Val Caniparoli, Mr. Tomasson and the rising young British choreographer Liam Scarlett), and Mr. Tomasson said that he tries to present something new to West Coast audiences in each program, even if it is not a company commission. Later this season, Mr. Ratamanksy’s ambitious “Shostakovich Trilogy,” created for American Ballet Theater, joins the company’s repertory.

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An article suggesting that ballet competitions make art into sport by Alice Robb in The New Republic.

Needless to say, some traditionalists object. “I don’t like the idea of that kind of competition,” said Carol Sumner, who danced as a soloist at New York City Ballet under George Balanchine. “To be a great dancer doesn’t mean to have a great technique. What you have to be is interesting. Mr. B [balanchine] said he chose dancers that are interesting to look at, he chose dancers that he wanted to see everyday—not necessarily the strongest ones.” But being interesting to look at won’t get you far when you’re being scored on the height of your extensions and the number of pirouettes you can turn.

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Kyle Froman talks about his career(s) as dancer and photographer.

Jerry was very hard to please, but I respected that. He knew exactly what he wanted and had no problem screaming at people until he got it. There's nothing like that though--having Jerry Robbins screaming at you. Even rehearsals were danced full-out, with energy and detail that rivaled performances.

I missed that pressure of dancing for a genius after he died. I felt the bar inevitably dropped quickly afterwards.

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Mobile Ballet opens its new season next month.

The sensational season begins on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 7:30 p.m. with the one-night only show "Stars of American Ballet," featuring principal dancers and soloists from New York City Ballet....

The Mobile Ballet Company will also present a scene from last year's premiere of Winthrop Corey's "Snow White."

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A story on the links between Pennsylvania Ballet and Balanchine by Ellen Dunkel in The Philadelphia Inquirer.

So when Weisberger was ready to launch her Philadelphia company, Balanchine was happy to assist: "They helped me and I'll help you. It's a debt repaid."

At his suggestion that she begin by working with an existing arts organization, for two years her dancers performed with the Philadelphia Lyric Opera Company. He nudged her with his oft-quoted line "but first a school," to train her future dancers before getting in too deep. And in April 1963, when the Ford Foundation awarded Weisberger a $45,000 grant, Balanchine gave her new troupe permission to perform many of his masterpieces free of charge.

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Ballet Forest Grove seeks sponsors for its Nutcracker.

Patty Petersen, who sits on the board of directors, said business sponsorships buy seats to be donated to community members. A $500 donation would block off 50 seats to be donated closer to showtime. Petersen said these often are given away to groups such as low-income families, military families and assisted living centers.

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A preview of the Joffrey Ballet in "La Bayadere" by Laura Molzahn in The Chicago Tribune.

Despite all the "ballet meets Bollywood" hype, Joffrey artistic director Ashley Wheater clearly coveted "Bayadere" for its classical dance, which permeates even the soapiest scenes. Calling it "the unsung hero in the canon" and the transition to better-known Petipa ballets like "Swan Lake" and "Sleeping Beauty," Wheater praises Welch's "understanding of our classical language and how to keep it alive, keep tuning it for the dancers we have today."

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A review of Ballet Des Moines in a triple bill by Michael Morain in The Des Moines Register.

Cong is the resident choregrapher at Tulsa Ballet, and he has a knack for balancing jaunty angles and fluid grace in a way that still looks cohesive. His dancers’ limbs are willowy, then rigid, then akimbo, like one of those multi-armed Hindu gods. In Sunday’s show, Grooters and her mop-topped partner, Amand Pulaj, articulated Cong’s vision especially well, gliding from one position to the next as naturally as the rest of us might walk down the street. They could have been figure skating on a rink.

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A review of LakeCities Ballet Theatre's 'Dracula' by Cheryl Callon for TheaterJones.

First, story creator Tom Rutherford brings in additional background information, including the origin of his bloodsucking tendencies and the need for brides. Marcela, Dracula’s first love and queen of his female companions, adds a new dimension to the story as well. For the most part, though, the basic structure of the story remains intact.

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