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Thursday, October 10


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#1 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:04 PM

Photos from ABT's gala.

 

Dancers donned their darkest chic, mingling with members of the ABT Junior Council, who organized the event. The classical company is gearing up for a busy season in New York City, with performances of The Tempest, The Moor's Pavane, and of course, The Nutcracker, slated for the next few months.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:09 PM

Reviews of Ballet West.

 

ChicagoNow

 

But the KNOCKOUT piece was The Lottery, based on the chilling short story by Shirley Jackson. The famous short story depicts a small town that performs an ancient ritual in which one person is chosen to be stoned to death at random, presumably to condemn the pointless violence in the modern world.

 

 

The Huffington Post

 

Rubies is attention grabbing and showy, but the pas de deux from Balanchine's Diamonds displays all the class and elegance associated with this coveted gemstone. The pace of this piece remains fairly slow throughout, but with Christiana Bennett's laser-focused precision and grace and Beau Pearson's confident partnering, attention never wanes for a moment from the dancers on stage.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:09 PM

Reviews of Ballet West.

 

ChicagoNow

 

But the KNOCKOUT piece was The Lottery, based on the chilling short story by Shirley Jackson. The famous short story depicts a small town that performs an ancient ritual in which one person is chosen to be stoned to death at random, presumably to condemn the pointless violence in the modern world.

 

 

The Huffington Post

 

Rubies is attention grabbing and showy, but the pas de deux from Balanchine's Diamonds displays all the class and elegance associated with this coveted gemstone. The pace of this piece remains fairly slow throughout, but with Christiana Bennett's laser-focused precision and grace and Beau Pearson's confident partnering, attention never wanes for a moment from the dancers on stage.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:10 PM

Ballet Tucson performs this weekend.

The twins' story is "one of the most well-known legends in Europe," says Daniel Precup, ballet master of Ballet Tucson and a native of Romania. "I'm surprised that people here don't know it."

Precup aims to change that with his new ballet, "Gemini." It's one of three big group ballets kicking off Ballet Tucson's 10th professional season in a series of five concerts this weekend. A spooky revival of "Dracula" is also on the program, along with a brand-new work that celebrates the Cole Porter songbook.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:13 PM

A review of the BBC Two profile of Sylvie Guillem by Ismene Brown in The Arts Desk.

 

Brief comments from the man who hired her for London, then-Royal Ballet director Sir Anthony Dowell, the veteran French director Pierre Lacotte and her recent contemporary choreographers Russell Maliphant and Akram Khan, all confirmed a general awe in which she is held as the über-ballerina of a full generation's span by a world in which impressiveness is common currency. Not least, Luke McMahon's film reminded us in brief excerpts that she has been blindingly elegant in anything she touched, from zipping with stiletto points through bejewelled tutu ballet through richly personalised character dramas to tensile, Zen-concentrated contemporary work.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:16 PM

Reviews of  Random Dance in Wayne McGregor's "Atomos."

 

The Evening Standard

 

McGregor admits that a famous Eighties sci-fi film is a key reference for the tonal colours and projections of the piece. We watch as dancers turn from exquisite creatures to mutant beings — flipping over each other, coiling in strange, double-jointed geometries to preserve the atomic structure....

 

The Telegraph

 

It opens wonderfully with a confident progression from a writhing group of bodies, to a sequence of sharply differentiated duets, then back to group dances for a contemporary chorus line who take hold of each other’s crossed hands with a kind of tentative wonderment.

 

Londonist

 

Atomos features ten dancers who impress with their sinuous forms, a live orchestra playing in the wings, and an ambiently lit backdrop that sets the mood. At the beginning of the performance you are also given 3D glasses, to be worn when plasma screens make an appearance halfway through. The combination of the screens and the dancers is effective to a degree, but at times the screens seem inessential other than as a nod to the technology that underlies this production.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:18 PM

More reviews.

 

The Stage

 

The new piece is characterised by McGregor’s innovative, often quirky collaborations, and his ongoing enquiry into both the choreographic process and the capabilities of the body. However, these often intellectualised concerns - the programme notes read like a masters degree in social anthropology - distract from what is an extraordinarily accomplished piece of choreography.

 

 

The Arts Desk

 

McGregor loves to bring his dancers out of turns in a counter-intuitive direction or to shatter and reassemble classical movement sequences. A striking example in Atomos is a pas de deux set over a cello solo. The situation is classical, but the movement cannot stay that way – arms are held up in fifth, then dive to the floor, while a developpé à la seconde is interrupted by a partner coming from behind at the most un-balletic waist level.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:30 PM

Columbia Classical Ballet kicks off its new season.

 

"Size-wise, we are probably the largest company in the Southeast. To do the big classics, you have to have a large company. I believe now we've achieved that," Pavlovich said. "That was always my goal, and it continues to be my goal, every year to go bigger and bigger, but bigger with quality. It's not just about quality, but quantity also."

 

Pavlovich brought in 15 new dancers from around the globe this season, bringing the company to a total of 53 dancers hailing from countries across Europe and Asia. These new dancers are helping the company move in a different direction, Pavlovich said.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:32 PM

An interview with ballet master James Jordan of Kansas City Ballet.

"It's very physical, very fast, it's every bit as challenging as ALLEGRO BRILLANTE technically [he's referring to the Balanchine piece also included in the program]. It really launches (Devon) in a great way that says to Kansas City that we've got a new director with this rich background of classicism, and he can choreograph."

 

One further bit of news on KCB's development as a top-flight company-the addition of a "Second Company" of five dancers, which Jordan refers to as "Kansas City Ballet Two." "Because they're not part of the AGMA (dancer's) union, they're a little more flexible, they can dance in the community and do more outreach."

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:34 PM

The Georgian State Ballet opens its new season.

 

On behalf of the FGB, together with Nina Ananiashvili, eight promising students of the Vakhtang Chabukiani Choreographic School were recognized and awarded with a scholarship for the 2013-2014 year. Nikoloz Sisauri, Nikoloz Chikhoria, Nikoloz Pirtskhelani Mikheil Djamaspishvili, Vasil Tsitsilashvili, Sofia Kardava, Anastasia Kadjaia and Lili Lekiashvili received scholarships in honor of patrons of the Georgian State Ballet.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:36 PM

Ballet B.C. reports another operating surplus.

 

The company is reporting an operating surplus of $150,000 for its 2012-2013 fiscal year—its third consecutive annual surplus. In a press statement today (October 10), it adds it also exceeded its fundraising goal for 2013 and has extended the contract of artistic director Emily Molnar for another three years.

 

 

Related.

 

Ballet B.C., which five years ago was on the verge of bankruptcy, on Wednesday declared a surplus of $150,000 for its 2013 operations. It is the largest in the company’s recent history, following on two minuscule surpluses in 2011 and 2012. Executive director Branislav Henselmann credited the efforts of artistic director Emily Molnar in luring patrons back to the theatre. The funds will be used to decrease the company’s accumulated deficit, he said.

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 02:14 PM

The Birmingham Royal Ballet presents "The Sleeping Beauty."

 

The delicate attention to detail and technical agility of the dancers against the sumptuous golden stage sets appeared to cast a mesmerising spell over the audience in this production.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 02:18 PM

An interview with Daria Klimentová.

“She [Medora] has lots of variations and is quite classical – which is very me, I like Swan Lake and the other ‘tutu-ballets’ – but she offers excitement as she flirts with all the men, even though her heart is for Conrad.”

 

Unfortunately, Daria is recovering from an injury and will not be dancing the role in Milton Keynes but her present dance partner Vadim Muntagirov will take to the stage as Conrad in the evening performance on Saturday 19 October.

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:30 PM

Q&A with Matthew Bourne.

Time Out New York: I love how, in the documentary about the making of the dance, you say that you’re true to the music, but approach it with an open mind.

Matthew Bourne: Yes. That was one of the things—there’s obviously more music than most productions use. I was trying to find music that was useful to me for drama and storytelling, as well as dance music, so I used music that’s sometimes not often used in the ballet version, because it was helpful to me with the story I was telling. Also, you’re aware that you don’t want to disappoint the people who know the piece, and there are certain things that have to be in there. The only major piece that’s not in there at all is the Bluebird. I just couldn’t find a reason for it. My response to the music is always to try and find another way of looking at it, and what I was surprised to discover in the Rose Adagio was a kind of sense of tragedy. If you listen to it with different ears and stop thinking about balancing [Laughs], there is a real drama there, and something tragic happens at the end.....

 




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