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Monday, October 7

17 posts in this topic

Chase Finlay is out for the season with an injury.

A company rep said, "Chase was injured during a recent performance . . . which was later diagnosed as a break to his fifth metatarsal. He had surgery on his foot and is recovering well....."

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Related story.

Mr. Finlay broke his fifth metatarsal during a Sept. 20 performance at the David H. Koch Theater in Lincoln Center....

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Scottish Ballet presents "A Streetcar Named Desire."

But don't arrive at the theater expecting Swan Lake. Streetcar is a classical ballet — dancers will be en pointe — but it has a "contemporary edge."

"That's what we're known for," Hampson says.

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Reviews of New York City Ballet.

The New York Times

Nobody else in ballet today is creating drama between man and woman as Mr. Ratmansky does: Each pas de deux has narrative tension, revealingly poetic imagery, striking steps. And nobody else today uses a corps de ballet as he does. The opening dance alone, with a slow, pacing entrance of 16 women (with black headgear cut like Louise Brooks hairdos, black chokers and saffron calf-length dresses), keeps changing intriguingly before our eyes: now they’re a flock of birds in flight, now they’re lolling odalisques with thoroughly human behavior.

The Wall Street Journal

Another revival, Alexei Ratmansky's wildly rich and diverse "Namouna, a Grand Divertissement" (2010), returned in all its fascinating glory. Riding the colorful sonorities of Eduoard Lalo's lush 1880s music, the current cast relished the choreography's challenge. As its mermaidlike figures, original cast member Sara Mearns exuded fierceness and finesse while Sterling Hyltin, new to the ballet, took on the climactic central duet with both delicacy and daring. New to the role of the cigarette-smoking maiden, Ashley Bouder overplayed the humor and undercut its potential wit.

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A review of Ballet Jorgen Canada by Paula Citron in The Globe and Mail.

Robert Desrosiers is back with a vengeance. At one time, he was one of the most famous choreographers in Canada with his unique fusion of whimsy and gymnastics, but he lost his company when his funding was pulled. Now, for BJC, he has crafted the delightful Bouffonia, his homage to old-world clowns inspired by commedia dell’arte, 19th-century European opera and silent movies. Once again, the audience is treated to Desrosiers’s singular imagination, a world filled with intriguing characters, costumes and props that crisscross the stage.

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Movie houses in Japan are showing more live performing arts broadcasts.

Behind the diversifying use of movie theaters are advances in digitization, said Yoshito Oyama, head of the marketing department at Aeon Entertainment.

The use of Aeon Cinema complexes will be expanded to culture, education and other fields to “revive movie theaters’ past role” as local stages for enjoying performances, Oyama added.

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A preview of Miami City Ballet's new season.

“I wanted to highlight everybody,” Lopez says. “There’s a lot in [some dancers] that hasn’t been brought out, and that’s what I love to do with dancers.” This was one of the many considerations that went into Lopez’s programming. “You want to engage and challenge your dancers, and you want to engage and challenge your audience. I created some excitement. I put four new works in each of the programs. Every program—even the Don Quixote—is different this year.”

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A review of Smuin Ballet by Irene Hsiao for SF Weekly.

Entertainment also seems to be at the root of Smuin's own 1997 Carmina Burana, set to the Orff score that launched a million action movie soundtracks. Melodramatically lit by Michael Oesch after Sara Linnie Slocum, the piece showed the whole company in fine classical form within a structure that alternated between the pseudoreligious ritual of "O Fortuna" to the strangely wry "Ecce gratum," which showed Erica Felsh prancing like an animated Christmas ornament around Eduardo Permuy, to the typical boy-girl story of "Stetit puella," executed with charm by Yarbrough and Ben Needham-Wood. Christian Squires impressed as a faintly Hungarian-accented faun frolicking as if alone in a bathhouse in "Tanz," and Jo-Ann Sundermeier displayed lovely, pure extensions in "Chume, chum geselle min," but overall the piece is a bombastic miscellany that doesn't cohere.

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A review of LINES Ballet by Elizabeth Schwyzer for The Santa Barbara Independent.

As the dance develops, order yields more and more to chaos: A woman in a whimsical wire-rimmed skirt hops about as her partner rolls on the floor, stuffing his mouth with crumpled papers. On a lesser company, such audacious departures from classical technique might collapse. With LINES, just when things seem to have tipped too far, a single stunning arabesque is all it takes to right it.

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An interview with Daniil Simkin (headline notwithstanding).

Simkin says he adapted to New York—eight months a year he lives on the Upper West Side; he spends the other months traveling to artist gigs around the world. Wherever he is, he keeps in touch with fans via social media. “I’m a bit of a geek,” he says, adding: “Many people think dance is old fashioned.” Simkin is determined to change that perception, with the help of the Internet. “Social media offers transparency,” he says. “I can show the work behind the stage, and in the studio—it’s mind-bending, what bodies can do. The videos can ignite people’s curiosity.”

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A preview of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in "The Handmaid's Tale."

It's quite a coup for the RWB and artistic director André Lewis to persuade one of the world's most successful writers to allow acclaimed New York-based choreographer Lila York to adapt her novel for ballet.

All of the elements come together on stage this week.

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An obituary for Michael Sebastiano, who has died at age 81.

Sebastiano retired from Capezio Ballet Makers after 47 years of service.

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A review of the Royal Ballet in "Don Quixote" by Louise Levene in The Telegraph.

Unfortunately much of the playing and dancing was equally watercolour in tone. This was largely thanks to the leaden and unresponsive tempi supplied by Martin Yates, who has re-orchestrated the Ludwig Minkus score and killed it stone-dead in the process. Minkus was no Tchaikovsky but his rippling melodies and brassy street numbers conjure a sunlit world of romance and mischief which is completely denatured in Yates’s passionless orchestration.

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Notes on two archival BBC broadcasts of choreography by Bournonville by Jennifer Fried for Broadway World.

Many may find themselves skeptical of watching La Sylphide, one of the oldest ballets in ballet's repertoire. However, Bournville's take was particularly delightful. The constant petite allegro kept my attention and drew me in as the dancers exploded with energy over the stage. Particularly delightful was the wedding scene, full of wit, character, and charm, between James (Flemming Flindt) and Effie (Shirley Dixon). The jealous Sylph (Lucette Aldous) steals the wedding ring, eagerly places it upon her finger, and dances around the stage. When tragedy strikes in the end it is even more pitiful, given the beauty of the Bournonville mise-en-scène

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Russian ballet stars perform in Amsterdam.

The Dutch audience enjoyed the unmatched ballet techniques of Bolshoi principal dancers Svetlana Zakharova, Yevgenia Obraztsova, Mikhail Lobukin and Vladislav Lantratov, the principal dancer of the Mariinsky Theater Viktoria Teryoshkina, and other ballet stars, who danced to the music of the best Russian ballet pieces.

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A review of Fall for Dance's third program by Martha Sherman for danceviewtimes.

The quartet offered a balanced unity of movement, yet it was hard to take your eyes off of the story’s central pair. Francisco Ruvalcaba, a guest artist from the Limon Company, boiled with physical and emotional power as Othello; Julie Kent danced the innocent, bewildered Desdemona, her gentle movements convincingly subtle under the voluminous white costume. It was Ruvalcaba’s shoulders, not just his scowl, that seethed with jealousy, and in the denouement, although they were hidden behind their nemeses dancing in front, the tragedy was confirmed in just a glimpse of Ruvalcaba’s powerful arms and Kent’s limp body.

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A review of Nevada Ballet Theatre and Cirque du Soleil in "A Choreographers' Showcase" by Mark Whittington in The Las Vegas Review-Journal.

But now, the companies blend effortlessly. The dancers from the Nevada Ballet and Cirque move comfortably outside their comfort zones — modern, jazz, tap, break dancing, contact improvisation, acrobatics and, yes, ballet. Without a program, you’d be hard-pressed to tell which dancers came from what company.

But true to its name, this showcase turns the spotlight on the choreographers. And they shine brightly as they explore a variety of styles in nine new pieces.

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