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NYPL Collection -- Onsite Viewing?


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#1 Helene

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 12:56 PM

Is it possible to view the NYPL videos in the library itself? Or do the videos have to be checked out?

#2 California

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:02 PM

Is it possible to view the NYPL videos in the library itself? Or do the videos have to be checked out?

Only the videos on the first floor can even be checked out. I haven't noticed if they have DVR players there. Everything in the third floor research collection must be watched on the premises on their video screens.



#3 Helene

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:07 PM

Where do the dance videos fall? If they're using DVR's, have the digitized the entire collection?

#4 rg

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:52 PM

Alastair Macaulay's recent  NYTimes article about the Jerome Robbins Dance Division's historic films, notes, if mem. serves, some of the procedures.

i believe it's fair to say that no, not all the collection's items have been digitized, those that have been can seen for the 'clicking' more or less on the premises, those that have not need to be requested from the desk and delivered to the reading room in one way or another.

i don't know what the codes are but i suspect that when one searches the catalog one can tell what items are digitized and thus more or less readily available and those that are not and thus need requesting 'arrival' in the viewing/reading room on the 3rd floor.

perhaps this is spelt out on the NYPL (the Library for the Performing Arts) site.



#5 Dale

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:31 PM

On the online catalog, there are symbols to show whether it is a DVD, VHS or older medium. There are sections that are for research only and require permission (some things are there for archive purpose only).



#6 Helene

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:51 PM

Thank you for your help. I was trying to figure it out from the NYPL site, but I found some of the info on the site confusing.

#7 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 05:09 AM

Is it possible to view the NYPL videos in the library itself? Or do the videos have to be checked out?

 

A general guide to using the NYPLPA collection of dance recordings:

 

1) I believe that the DVDs that can be checked out from the NYPLPA are limited to commercial releases. The items in the research collection must be viewed on site -- i.e., at NYPLPA's Lincoln Center location. To date, that that includes the streamable items that have been digitized. I don't know if the streams will eventually be made available at other NYPL branches.

 

2) The catalogue indicates whether the item you want to view is a film, a video, a DVD, or a streamable digitized film. For example, I did a basic search for "balanchine" and "square dance." Under "Format" I checked the boxes for "film" "video cassette" and "DVD." You can see the results here. The first item that appears is a film on video disk of Suzanne Farrell's final performance. (No, she didn't dance Square Dance at her final performance ... It just so happens that Square Dance was on the program. You can get more information on the item -- cast, performance date, wide or close shot, etc by clicking on it's entry title.) Note the green text that reads "In-library use only": If you wanted to view this item, you have to request it from the desk and watch it in the third floor viewing stations. (More on how that works below.)

 

3) A little further down the list is a listing for "Square Dance [Close Shot] (Film - 1993)." This item has been digitized and can be streamed on-site. If you click on the text that reads "Connect to this title online (onsite at Library for the Performing Arts only)" you will be taken to the film's web page where you will be given more information about the item and told that you can stream it on-site. 

 

4) Some notes about the 3rd floor viewing room:

 

a) If you want to view one of the not yet digitized, not streamable items, you have to write down its catalogue number and give it to one of the clerks at the 3rd floor AV desk.  He or she will hand you a set of headphones and send you to a viewing station (basically, video monitors set up in study carrells). Your hands never touch the media! A technician in the bowels of the AV collection loads it remotely and feeds the content to your designated viewing station. You can control playback from your workstation and communicate directly with the AV tech if there is a problem with the film (e.g., no sound, no picture, etc.) I'm guessing that one of the real advantages to the digitization project is reducing the number of items that have to be viewed with the assistance of an AV tech.

 

b) BE WARNED! You have to check the following items before you are allowed into the 3rd floor special collections and viewing area:

 

  • Parcels and packages
  • Shopping bags and oversized bags (including purses)
  • Suitcases and large containers
  • Strollers
  • Briefcases, back packs, and bookbags
  • Coats and umbrellas
  • Laptop cases

 

You can bring in:

 

  • Personal books and other reading or writing materials
  • Laptop computers
  • Small purses

 

Everything has to fit into one of the plastic bags the staff gives you. (I usually bring a clear plastic ziploc of my own just in case.)

 

c) You have to get special permission to view some items. Usually this just means filling out a form stating your purpose for viewing the item and acknowledging that you will only be allowed to view it a limited number of times; it really depends on the restrictions the donor or rights holder has put on the material. The few times I've had to do this, I had to view the film in a special room (the Theater on Film and Tape Archive, or TOFT) -- I don't know if that applies to all special permission films or just the ones I happened to request. 

 

d) Be prepared for less than ideal viewing conditions: the carrells are a cramped, the lights are bright, there's a bit of a hubbub going on around you, playback can be a bit wonky, etc. But it's worth it! 



#8 Helene

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 08:46 AM

Kathleen, thank you so much!

#9 sandik

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 06:41 PM

 

d) Be prepared for less than ideal viewing conditions: the carrells are a cramped, the lights are bright, there's a bit of a hubbub going on around you, playback can be a bit wonky, etc. But it's worth it! 

 

 

I'm getting all nostalgic!

 

Yes, absolutely worth it!



#10 Barbara

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 06:40 AM

Thanks from me too, Kathleen. I've often wanted to give this a try and even though I work at my local public library and should be somewhat familiar with procedures, I've been shy about jumping in. I'm going to print out your guidelines.



#11 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 08:13 AM

I neglected to mention that there are computer workstations in the 3rd floor carrells -- including the viewing stations -- from which you can access the on-line catalogue.

 

So, you don't have to look everything up before you go. If you're near Lincoln Center and you've got an hour or two to kill, you can just wander into NYPLPA and watch whatever strikes your fancy. Provided the Library is open, of course. Its hours are limited: 12PM-6PM on Tues, Wed, Fri, & Sat; 12PM-8PM on Mon & Thu; closed on Sun.



#12 sandik

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 08:44 AM

If you're near Lincoln Center and you've got an hour or two to kill,...

 

You know, some of us rearrange our travel to the east coast to create some time for the library.



#13 SimonA

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 09:53 AM

Just FYI -- The last time I visited the NYPLPA in June, I was required to sign up for a library card simply to view the videos (and not check anything out), which I had never had to do before.  The process was relatively painless, but it took up about 15 or 20 minutes of my viewing time.



#14 sandik

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 01:19 PM

They've been signing people up for cards for a number of years, especially if you want to use the video archive materials -- as you say, painless, but takes time.  (and there's a photo, for people who care about that kind of thing)




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