Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Saturday, October 5


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:37 PM

Peoria Ballet offers a piece inspired by St. Thomas Aquinas.

 

Gallardo portrays Aquinas. But he does little dancing - instead he stands behind a table, pen in hand, writing his book. He directs his thoughts with an occasional swing of his hand. In the foreground, Faith, danced by Allexe Slevin, and Reason, danced by Alexandra James, portray his thoughts. They do battle in the form of contemporary dance. Both leads are accompanied by angels - a total of six ballerinas perform the piece.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:39 PM

A review of Ballet West  in "The Sleeping Beauty" by Laura Molzahn in The Chicago Tribune.

 

As Aurora, Christiana Bennett moved convincingly from charming, bashful 16-year-old to psychologically entombed incipient woman to serene bride. Though overall she was confident in the famously difficult Rose Adagio, the act of releasing her suitors' supporting hand sometimes brought with it a look of uncertainty — and once, outright terror. Bennett seemed more at ease as the remote vision that Prince Desire chases in Act II, and she excelled in Act III, particularly in the Grand Pas fish dives, where she plunged dramatically toward the floor.

 

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 01:53 PM

Reviews of the Birmingham Royal Ballet.

 

The Kidderminster Shuttle

 

And so we move on to Tombeaux, Bintley’s homage to his mentor, the great Frederick Ashton. This is the dance equivalent of a Celtic lament, a movement in song so achingly poignant that the heart takes a little jump that can only really be felt rather than described by words alone.

 

Lichfield Live

 

But the real high point of the evening was his ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café from 1988 about the extinction of species which has assumed an iconic significance. Set to Simon Jeffes’ amazing score which ranges from the jaunty to the apocalyptic, funny yet thought-provoking, poignant and profoundly disturbing, as seen here it is a masterpiece which was greeted by excited cheers from a packed young audience and ended to prolonged curtain calls.

 

Tamworth Herald

 

Alongside preparing to deliver one of the oldest ballets and most well-known classic storytales of all time, The Sleeping Beauty, next week Birmingham’s resident ballet company, The Birmingham Royal Ballet, have also been working tirelessly to present a triple bill of the company director, David Bintley CBE’s creations on the Hippodrome stage – and the result was simply spell-binding.

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 05 October 2013 - 02:05 PM

A review of "Fall for Dance" by Michael Popkin for danceviewtimes.

 

If all this sounds a little hokey, it was. But that made no difference. Missé is a great performer and the twenty-five minutes or so of “Esencia Tango” indeed provided an essential: a close-up, first-hand experience of a great dance artist at work.

Justin Peck’s short commission, “The Bright Motion,” for New York City Ballet’s Sara Mearns and Casey Heard of the Dutch National Ballet, was just as much a star vehicle as the prior tango for Missé. The short, slight work that capitalized on Mearns’ extraordinary dramatic presence provided an impact far beyond its length.....

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:35 PM

A review of Scottish Ballet in " A Streetcar Named Desire" by Chris Waddington in The Times-Picayune.
 

 

Mutso didn’t do it alone. On Friday, before a stunned and silenced house of 2,200 theater goers, the Scottish Ballet showed the depths of its roster and the dramatic savvy of the team that assembled the project.

 

Sophie Martin and Erik Cavallari captured the animal vitality and sensuous bond between Stella and Stanley Kowalski. As Blanche’s dead husband and his long ago lover, Victor Zarollo and Daniel Davidson evoked the heartbreaking secret passion that triggers the tragedy. Lewis Landini was a perfect Mitch: shy, clowning, wounded and angry.

 

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:37 PM

Ballet Manila presents "Carmen."

 

It is not a secret that the Philippine’s one and only Prima Ballerina, Lisa Macuja-Elizalde, will be retiring from performing at the end of the year. Her expertise and talent on stage will certainly be missed by the ballet industry and enthusiasts. However, she will make sure she will end her golden era with spectacular shows. One of them is “Carmen” in which she plays the title role.

 



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:39 PM

A review of Minnesota Dance Theatre by Caroline Palmer for The Star-Tribune.

 

New associate artistic director Charles Askegard’s “Serenade for Two” is set to “Serenade in A” by Igor Stravinsky and performed live by pianist Tom Linker. Perhaps the music’s tone is to blame, but the work — danced by guest artists Kaitlyn Gilliland and Clifford Williams — struggles against a laborious feeling in its first few minutes.

 



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:07 PM

A review of Colorado Ballet in "Giselle" by Ray Mark Rinaldi in The Denver Post. Much obliged to YouOverThere for sending in the link!

 

This was not a perfect opening night, not every dancer or musician had their hands, or their heads, planted exactly where they should be. The choreography, by Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot in 1940, demands as much acting as it does dancing and, the first act, up until the mad scene that closes it, could have used more chemistry — between performers, between the orchestra and the dancers. One exception was the youthful peasant pas de deux between Dana Benton and Adam Still.

 

 



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:24 PM

A review of the new documentary on the life of Tanaquil Le Clercq by Ronnie Scheib for Variety.

 

“Afternoon of a Faun,” Nancy Buirski’s documentary on famed ’50s prima ballerina Tanaquil Le Clercq, has a lot going for it: extraordinary footage of the exquisite dancer in signature roles created for her by master choreographers George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins; a romantic triangle involving those artistic giants; full-blown tragedy as Le Clercq is struck down by polio in her prime; and enough terrible ironies to fill several documentaries. Questionable emphases sometimes skew the film’s proportions, but between the beauty of the dance imagery and the lyricism of passages culled from Le Clercq’s personal letters, “Faun” often soars.

 



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,965 posts

Posted 11 October 2013 - 02:32 PM

A review of the Australian Ballet in 'Cinderella' by Gracia Haby for the Fjord Review.

 

“Cinderella” is a beautiful collision of opposites. The grotesque plays opposite the romance of the fairytale with the happy ending we are assured of from the outset, with or without the transportation conjuring feats performed by mice and pumpkins. There can be little doubt that to bite into one of the stepsisters or the stepmother would be fatal: ‘sugary on the outside and venomous inside.’Comedy plays opposite heartache, and real time plays opposite suspended time. It combines the timeless with the ephemeral, and the classic with the modern with all the ease of a Giorgio de Chirico painting.

 

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):