Jump to content


Nobel Prize in Literature???


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#16 Quiggin

Quiggin

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 795 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 08:59 AM

Maybe Faulkner set the bar too high? Anyway what would the press have said if J D Salinger had won the prize – or any normally shy writer (they once did tend to be, if not shy, fairly modest) who didn't want to go or say much?



#17 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,012 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 09:28 AM

Why should she be shy about accepting the cash?  She was selected by the committee for her output -- she didn't apply for it -- and she wasn't given the cash for making speeches and shaking hands.  A nice thank-you note should have been fine.

As some people say now -- word.



#18 kfw

kfw

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,153 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:35 AM

Maybe Faulkner set the bar too high? 

 

And of course the irony is that he supposedly mumbled and spoke so softly that the audience didn't hear it very well and realize how great it actually was.



#19 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,002 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:51 AM

The giving of a lecture is indeed part of the deal in receiving the prize. It doesn't have to be made at the ceremony itself but recipients are generally expected to make one at some point. I would think that it would be nice for recipients whose personal circumstances allow them to do so to appear. It's a big award.

 

It has been announced that Ms. Munro will not be able to attend the award ceremony and the following banquet. This is a great pity, but also understandable, she is not a young person and it is first of all a long journey and then a very busy week with a lot of functions. Someone will receive the prize on her behalf - might be the Canadian ambassador, and her Nobel lecture could always be relayed by link from Canadian Broadcasting. The reason given was that her "health is frail" and that was quite accepted. But I remember the uproar in the media when Elfriede Jelinek did not attend the ceremony because she said she was too shy to appear in public. As the press remarked, there was no shyness about accepting the cash!

 

Too bad. I wish the Committee hadn't taken so long to honor Munro. Maybe this will teach them to get to deserving recipients in a timely fashion....

 

Pamela, as I remember it wasn't only a question of Jelinek being "too shy" - I have read that she suffers from agoraphobia and related problems. If that's the case, a week of celebrations would be very difficult for her. She did present a lecture, although not at the ceremony, obviously.



#20 Pamela Moberg

Pamela Moberg

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 566 posts

Posted 11 December 2013 - 04:09 PM

Every year I have written something about the Nobel Prize ceremony. It was yesterday and I do hope you all have seen something on TV. I did not, unfortunately. We had a
storm and no electricity for five days (got by with a wood burning stove and candles). Alice Munro did not attend, but her prize was received by her daughter. Ms. Munro was not the only one not to attend, the Crown Princess had gone to South Africa for the memorial service of Nelson Mandela, and Princess Madeleine, Mrs. O'Neill, had to remain in N.Y. owing to her pregnancy. Still, there will be another glittering feast next year...

#21 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,012 posts

Posted 11 December 2013 - 07:11 PM

Oh my goodness -- I'm sorry to miss your Nobel report, but so glad you seem to have come relatively unscathed through a messy time!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):