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Monday, September 30


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#1 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 10:59 AM

A review of Ballet Manila in "Carmen" by Rina Angela Corpus for GMA News.

 

The sweetness in Macuja-Elizalde's pixie-like mien also toned down the otherwise aggressive nature in Carmen's character, and I realize how much effort is required to act out the character of a nasty and loose woman, which goes against the popular public image of Macuja-Elizalde as a goody-two-shoes "ballerina of the people." It was a sheer moment of allowing the body to be colonized by another character, the free-spirited gypsy girl Carmen—whom Macuja-Elizalde herself called a characteristic “bitch,” during the open floor discussion which she held right after the 45-minute ballet.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:01 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Uruguay.

 

The company, under the artistic direction of Argentine dancer Julio Bocca, offered a diverse program that highlighted both its classical ballet training and its Latin roots when it made its Omani debut at the Royal Opera House Muscat on Wednesday evening. The first part of the show included two pieces of modern ballet and one more classical, while the second featured tango-inspired ballet.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:03 AM

A review of a benefit gala for the Yorkshire Ballet Summer School  by Zoe Anderson in The Independent.

 

The gala was particularly strong on male dancing. Birmingham Royal Ballet’s Brandon Lawrence, recently a YBSS star pupil, danced Christopher Tudor’s When the Time Comes with poised elegance. Rambert’s Dane Hurst moved with sumptuous, animal warmth in Mark Baldwin’s solo Impala. The Royal Ballet’s Steven McRae showed off his tap skills with panache, throwing in ballet leaps between bursts of glittering footwork.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:05 AM

A review of Matthew Bourne's Sleeping Beauty by Michael Morain in The Des Moines Register.

 

The show would have been better with a live orchestra, but the recording is an excusable trade-off. It’s expensive to tour with all the musicians required for Tchaikovsky’s elaborate score.

So in this show, at least, the visuals win out. And they win big.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:05 AM

A corporate gift allows the Louisville Ballet to have live music for its Nutcracker.

 

A decade ago, the Louisville Orchestra accompanied all of the Ballet’s performances. It would cost the Ballet about $380,000 a year to do that now (not even including conductors). That’s 11 percent of the Ballet’s annual budget, so these days, the ballet dances to recorded music.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:07 AM

The Atlanta Ballet will perform internationally for the first time in a decade.

 

The 84-year-old company said Monday it will start its upcoming season with a two-week tour of China. In late October, it will join 11 other companies from around the world for China’s inaugural “International Ballet Season” hosted by the National Ballet of China. It will have seven performances in Beijing before returning on Nov. 11.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:09 AM

A review of New York City Ballet's "Black and White" program by Andrew Blackmore-Dobbyn for Broadway World.

 

Opening with the Four Temperaments is a safe bet in any program. It is an iconic modern ballet that has withstood the test of time and has been performed by too many dancers to name. In the opening Theme, Justin Peck, whose new ballet was premiering at the same time over at City Center, was shimmering with Ashley Laracey. The pair was... charismatic. It's inescapable. The audience reacts more favorably to the performers with star quality even if the dancing isn't as good. In this case it was very good.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:11 AM

A review of Tulsa Ballet by James D. Watts Jr. in Tulsa World.
 

 

On the surface, however, "Company B" can be enjoyed simply as a raucous celebration of Taylor's distinctly American, muscular style of ballet.

Jiyan Dai tore through the solo in "Tico-Tico" with great skill, while Johnnathan Ramirez Meija combined comedy and physical daring in the "Oh Johnny, Oh Johnny Oh" number. Shu Kinouchi barrelled through "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" with a devil-may-care attitude, while Sebelin was very good in the sadly romantic "I Can Dream, Can't I?"

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:14 AM

Reviews of Pacific Northwest Ballet.

 

It’s been 40 years since the premiere of Tharp’s first cross-over ballet, Deuce Coupe. This MacArthur fellow has continued to explore how disparate styles can share the stage. Waiting at the Station feels different from Tharp’s earlier work. Here, for the most part, she resists using ballet to show off feats of speed and extreme extension; fewer starburst arms and daring lifts punctuate the phrasing. And she doesn’t use the jazz to shock; Moore’s jazziness is casual and graceful, unrushed and cool. The result? A more subtle energy.

 

 

The Seattle Times

 

“Brief Fling,” set to a Michel Colombier/Percy Grainger score that spans folk, electronic and martial music, arrays four clans of dancers in different Scottish plaids — green, blue, red and white.

 

The presentation is somewhat marred by a recorded score, which sounds muzzy in McCaw Hall, but the reward is a spectacularly fast cyclone of a quartet danced by Leta Biasucci, Ezra Thomson and, again, the fabulously athletic Porretta and Gaines.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2013 - 11:16 AM

A review of New York City Ballet in Swan Lake by Michael Popkin for danceviewtimes.

 

Mearns became a star in the dual role of Odette/Odile when she was plucked from the corps to dance it in 2006. The role suits her physique, facility and temperament. Yet Odette has always come to her more naturally than Odile and her black swan pas de deux has been weaker than her white acts.  The problem has been keeping her tall, long-limbed body under control at high speed – or it was until Tuesday night, when she danced the black act with a finish and confidence that elevated the theatrical impact of this scene to the level of her other acts. 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 08:20 PM

Queensland Ballet's 2014 season features "Romeo and Juliet."

A resident at the Houston Ballet Theatre at the time, Cunxin worked with MacMillan on other ballets (“he was incredibly demanding, really challenged you”), and starred in other productions of Shakespeare's tragic love story, but never this particular version.

 

“So now I have the chance to get this ballet for our dancers to do.”

 


 



#12 dirac

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 08:22 PM

A feature on "Dancers Among Us," a series of photographs by Jordan Matter.

 

He found that dancers made the perfect subjects to bring his vision to life, and spent three years traveling around the country, photographing volunteer dancers doing extraordinary things in ordinary, everyday situations.

 

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 08:29 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Mariko Nagashima for Seattle Dances.

 

The highly anticipated Waiting at the Station immersed the viewer into a hazy and bustling New Orleans train station. Tharp has choreographed many Broadway shows, and Waiting clearly falls into this splashy vein. Its narrative tells the story of a man’s final and heartfelt farewell as he waits to catch a train both metaphorically and, as the final scene proves, quite literally as well....

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 08:36 PM

A review of the Royal Ballet in "Don Quixote" by Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

...What Acosta has principally aimed for is to clarify the narrative, find a more contemporary vibe for the characters and, above all, to rediscover the ballet's fun.

 

In that, he has largely succeeded. Despite an opening night that was startlingly accident-prone, Acosta has elicited a genuine, collective sense of larkiness from his production. He has stripped the mime of its most cod Spanish mannerisms and restored a credible sense of spontaneity to the acting.

 

 




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