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Monday, September 23


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12 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:04 AM

A story on Twyla Tharp's residency at Pacific Northwest Ballet by Alice Kaderlan for Crosscut.

 

But unlike Stowell, Boal is not a choreographer. And though he made it a priority to attract a wide range of important guest choreographers, many of them new to PNB, there are certain experiences a dancer only gains by working with an artist-in-residence: Learning ballets created specifically for them, becoming an integral part of the choreographer’s creative process or becoming an expert in a resident artist's particular style.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:16 AM

A review of New York City Ballet in Preljocaj's "Spectral Evidence" by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.

 

http://www.ft.com/cm...l#ixzz2fk0J5CIq

 

Still, the men, particularly soloist Robert Fairchild, ended up looser than they started. As if at the bacchanal from which Cage always seems one step away, Fairchild mouthed the e.e. cummings lyrics to a Cage song while weaving and wobbling with unkeeled joy.

 

Spectral Evidence gave off a similar unforced, off-kilter vibe – so rare at New York City Ballet as to amount to a visitation from another world.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:19 AM

The Fort Wayne Ballet receives $1 million to set up an endowment fund.

 

The 2013-2014 performance season marks the 16th season that Gibbons-Brown will lead the ballet. During her tenure, it has grown from 87 students to more than 400. The 2010 book "On Technique" published by University Press of Florida named her one of the top 18 pedagogues in the world.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:21 AM

A review of Boston Ballet's performance on Boston Common by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe.

 

Most of the audience would have been following the action on the big TV screens. Switching between close-ups and ensemble shots, the camerawork was generally good. There was a tendency to pull back when the music stopped, so in “Rooster,” the screens missed the “Play With Fire” moment when Parrondo flicked out Schlagheck’s fire, and also the conclusion of “Sympathy for the Devil,” when Robert Kretz readjusted his tie one last time and glared at the audience.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:22 AM

A review of the Houston Ballet in "The Merry Widow."

 

Hanna arrives in a glittering black gown and jewels that are anything but widow-somber. It is Principal Dancer, Ms. Hassenboehler, now at the beginning of her third decade with the company, whose imminent retirement is receiving such deserved recognition. Here, as the dancing in the ballroom explodes with grandeur, she has on full display the breathtaking talent that has made her a treasure with this company. At one point, with her back to the audience, she glided across the floor so smoothly en pointe that I overheard a woman seated near me saying, “She looks like a floating apparition!” There were times in this First Act that the ensemble seemed an orbiting and rapid-fire circle of adoration around Hanna, and there were moments when one could easily call to mind the memorable spinning and frenzied waltz in the classic film “Madame Bovary.”

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:24 AM

A review of the Australian Ballet  in 'Cinderella' by Heather Bloom for Australian Stage.

 

Endless light. This brings me to the title character of the performance, Cinderella. Danced by Madeleine Eastoe, she embodied the very essence of this character without a trace of self-pity. Eastoe was a strong Cinderella, rather than a damsel in distress. The perfectly cast dancer brought a new strength to Cinderella. Technical perfection from both Eastoe and her prince Kevin Jackson allowed for the drama to unfold and both sensational dancers the chance to flex their acting chops as well.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:28 AM

A review of the West Australian Ballet  in 'Onegin' by Narelle Towle for WA Today.

The company, dressed in simple period costume (although as an aside, the male leads' tights were daring, even by the standards of ballet tights), delivered John Cranko's choreography with aplomb.

 

WA's Jayne Smeulders plays naive country girl Tatiana who is obsessed with new lead Czech dancer Jiri Jelinek as the snobbish, yet flirtatious Onegin.



#8 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:47 AM

A review of Lucy Moore's "Nijinsky: A Life" by James Davidson in The London Review of Books (26 September issue).

 

Having read her biography and having long ago also read Nijinska’s and Romola’s versions of his life, I still don’t know what to think about Nijinsky, his violence and stupidity, his vanity and sublimity. But then I remember that he was only 29 when he publicly lost his marbles in the Suvretta House Hotel, only 24 when he premiered Jeux and The Rite of Spring in the same season, only 23 when he performed as the faun and only 20 when he was first hailed as the god of the dance in Paris. And throughout all that he was the direct or indirect object of a great geyser of sexual and romantic fantasies on the part of hordes of aristocrats and members of the upper-middle class, both men and women, from all over the world. With that degree of fantastic projection and expectation, and obliged to perform at the epicentre of the modern movement in Paris in the early 1910s, it is amazing he managed to play the sane game for so long.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:57 AM

A review of Dancing on Water: A Life in Ballet, from the Kirov to the ABT by Elena Tchernichova (and Joel Lobenthal) by Robert Gottlieb in the 10 October issue of The New York Review of Books.

 

By this point in her story we realize that what she had been doing through her years as a student was observing, watching, judging. She was, for instance, reaching conclusions about the Kirov’s ballerinas, most importantly Natalia Dudinskaya, who with her husband, the company’s artistic director, Konstantin Sergeyev, ruled the roost and who with her amazing allegro technique dazzled the world but "knew that she didn’t have the line, the cantilena, for adagio, and so she danced the Shades [in La Bayadère] faster than any other ballerina in history." And in contrast the glorious but ill-starred Alla Shelest: Elena’s page-and-a-half description of Shelest in La Bayadère should be required reading for every dancer who assumes the role of Nikiya. We also grow aware of how Dudinskaya (that "inveterate intrigante") managed to block her rival’s career. The Sergeyevs, here as in other accounts, emerge as the Macbeths of the Kirov.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 11:05 AM

Pix  from the New York City Ballet gala from New York Social Diary.

 

Ballet today like many cultural activities in the metropolis is big business. It has many objectives. One of the main ones is to encourage people to come. That begins with the children; and exposing them to the wonder and its possibilities. There are many in attendance in these audiences -- especially among the women -- who had studied ballet (or dreamed of it) when they were kids.

 

More.



#11 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 03:31 PM

Darcey Bussell talks about her new gig as a judge for the Genée International Ballet Competition (and the experience of being judged back in the day).

 

"I remember as a young student thinking it was only about the technique," she says. "I was totally preoccupied with whether I had the right line or could hold a balance, because you’re constantly strengthening your technique all your student life. But a competition like this is about performing and showing your personality on stage. I love to see somebody that enjoys what they’re doing."

 

Bussell’s memory of winning the Prix de Lausanne aged 17 is not of the adoration felt, but the acknowledgement that it was the start, not the end, of her quest. Her attitude towards the Genée medallists is much the same.

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 03:33 PM

A review of the New York City Ballet gala by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

 

This was followed immediately by the finale of Balanchine's "Western Symphony", with Maria Kowroski at her daffy best, courted by Zachary Catazaro in a spirited debut. Balanchine's rigorous craftmanship and witty musicality was almost too much of a shock after the dark, trendy despair of the Preljocaj, and the audience seemed a bit stunned, though certainly glad to see something in technicolor. But presumably the gala generated a lot of green, along with the red, white, and black.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 11:15 AM

Another story on the Fort Wayne Ballet's  receipt of a $1 million donation.

It was “quite a bit surprising,” Gibbons-Brown said, when the ballet learned recently the Auer Foundation would donate the entire $1 million.

 

The ballet still will need to manage its budget, which has stayed in positive numbers for the past several years, as well as to raise money for its normal operations, Gibbons-Brown said.

 




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