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Saturday, September 21


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#1 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:19 PM

Boston Ballet gives a free performance on Boston Common.

 

“I hope that people take advantage of the opportunity to see what we do,” Breen Combes said. “And I hope that people that thought it was only girls in white tutus, that they’ll come and see that that’s not what we do.”

 

 

Related.

 

A crowd that rivaled the size of the Red Sox fans packed into Fenway Park across town filled the Boston Common lawn at the corner of Beacon and Charles streets.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:21 PM

The Connecticut Ballet prepares "Cinderella."

This is the first time in 32 years that the company is presenting three full-length productions for its Stamford season. After "Cinderella, the "Nutcracker" returns for two weekends in December and "Giselle" makes a comeback May 3 after a hiatus of 24 years.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:23 PM

Darcey Bussell shares thoughts and memories about food with John Hind for The Guardian.
 

 

At 13 I started, late, at the White Lodge [the Royal Ballet's school in Richmond Park]. It was 15 to a dorm back then and the food wasn't great. I remember tongue sandwiches quite a lot. We used to head to Sheen for chips, and one friend, from up north, introduced me to pork scratchings.



#4 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:30 PM

The Grand Rapids Ballet Company makes an unexpected appearance at an arts fair.

 

Grand Rapids Ballet isn't a part of the fifth annual exhibition and $560,000 competition, but that didn't stop Michigan's only professional ballet company from sneaking in a little bit of performance art.

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:33 PM

A story on the importance of the corps de ballet, featuring quotes from Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre personnel, by Mark Kanny for The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

 

“George Balanchine (in the mid-20th century) is really known for the quickness of his feet. The petite allegro magnified dance in America,” Orr says....

 
“When you compare Mr. Balanchine and 21st century corps de ballet, dance has become so much more demanding on all dancers, not just the corps but principals, too, in the kind of material they must know and be able to perform. Consequently, dancers are much better today than they were five or 10 years ago, especially so compared with 20 years ago. Their bodies now move in (their) entirety to the point of almost being dizzy.”

 

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:38 PM

A review of the Joffrey Ballet by Hedy Weiss in The Chicago Sun-Times' blog.

 

Jaiani and Suluashvili (the gorgeously matched real life husband-and-wife) also danced the electrifying “Adagio” Possokhov created for them, set to music from “Spartacus” by Aram Khatchaturian, and beautifully lit by Jack Mehler. The duet takes the form of a revery as a man 9perhaps imprisoned) appears to be visited by the vision of his beloved. With elaborate lifts and a complex, sinuous interweaving of bodies, there is an intimacy here that is at once thrilling in its eroticism and artistry. The ideally matched physical beauty and technique of this couple is really something to behold.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:49 PM

A video interview from PopSugar with Sarah Jessica Parker, Olivier Theyskens, and Prabal Gurung at the NYCB gala.

 

It was a special evening for Natalie and Benjamin in particular since they first met while making the film Black Swan, much of which was filmed right at Lincoln Center.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:56 PM

A review of the Stuttgart Ballet in "Othello" by Ilona Landgraf for danceviewtimes.

 

...Stuttgart's Jason Reilly, one of the company's outstanding dance-actors and in his prime as an artist, gives his Othello proud confidence and aplomb, a warrior commanding respect until drifting into uncontrollable, desperate rage. In Hamburg Cuban Amilcar Moret Gonzales, ex-principal of Neumeier's ensemble, came back as guest dancer for the role of the Moor. Gonzales, with his soft features and wide eyes, is less the embodiment of a tough, superior general, but charming in his amorousness. Both men strangle their Desdemonas out of love, but while Reilly is determined to kill, Gonzales seems as if Jago's influence has emptied him of all strength. He murders because he has to, though in fact he doesn’t want to. Each of the Desdemonas – Alicia Amatriain in Stuttgart, Helene Bouchet in Hamburg – has her own way of touching intensity....

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:41 AM

Tamara Rojo is interviewed by Louise Levene in The Spectator.

Does she have any sympathy with the view that the arts might be considered a luxury in a time of austerity? ‘The arts are not a luxury!’ she asserts. ‘The arts are a necessity. It’s not just about eating and sleeping. We need to use our imaginations. It gives us hope. It makes us learn about existential questions that are intrinsic to human beings.

 

‘We want to know who we are, where we are going, why we are here. The only place where you can find some answers is not in the market, it is in the arts.’

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 10:52 AM

A photo gallery from "The Metamorphosis" with text by Laura Marsh in The New York Review of Books' blog.

 

This production is mounted by the Royal Ballet but it is described as a “dance theater adaptation”, and most of the roles involve more acting than dancing. (Although there is not much in the way of dialogue, occasionally the characters cry out in Czech. More often they scream.) Yet Pita’s Metamorphosis is much concerned with ballet and ambivalent about it. Grete aspires to be not a violinist, as she does in Kafka, but a ballet dancer. Her character develops in the opposite direction to her brother’s. As Gregor is more and more dehumanized, we see Grete progressing from an attempted pirouette in her school uniform, to her first ballet slippers, to pointe shoes. Whether her transformation is desirable is an open question, but the final moments of the performance suggest that it might not be....

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 11:31 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Tobi Tobias in her blog, "Seeing Things."
 

Not since Suzanne Farrell has the City Ballet harbored the enormous imaginative resources of a dancer like Mearns, who played the double role on opening night. This is not to say that the two dancers are anything alike. (Every member of the highest grade of ballerinas is, obviously, sui generis.) Farrell was first and foremost an angel, a dancer whose very persona indicated qualities of the unworldly—indeed, the sublime. Mearns is a dancer whose feet (and instincts) are rooted in an imaginary earth. Again and again, in any of her performances, she reminds you that she is not a “ballerina” but a “dancer,“ in the way that Soledad Barrio and other greats of Terpsichore’s many-faceted realm are more than practitioners of a particular codified form of dancing.

 




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