fadedhour

"Nijinsky: A Life"

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Has anyone heard anything about this book? Or planning to read it? I've seen a couple reviews around:

Here's the Guardian one: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2013/may/01/nijinsky-lucy-moore-review

And this is from the Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/10028244/Nijinsky-a-Life-by-Lucy-Moore-review.html

The Telegraph one I find odd, because it opens by discussing film footage of Nijinsky when I'm pretty sure none exists - it also refers to Romola as 'a second-rate dancer' when I wouldn't really call her a dancer at all.

I've actually just started rereading Buckle, so I'm curious about this one.

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The Telegraph one I find odd, because it opens by discussing film footage of Nijinsky when I'm pretty sure none exists. . .

I thought the same, but if you search for him on YouTube, several short clips show up. I have always assumed these were faked somehow. Does anybody know?

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Joan Acocella has done a NYer 'notebook' on the 'creator' of these Nijinsky 'films' which are put together from stills as if they were films, if mem. serves.

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yes, he took series of photos of Nijinsky in the same roles and kind of morphed them into each other to create the illusion of movement.

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i'd guess this is what the reviewer meant, there are no known films of Nijinsky as far as i understand it.

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Lucky Nijinsky!

I just heard about the book today, fadedhour. Thank you for posting about it. I look forward to reading the reviews. (And perhaps the book!)

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I actually was just given this book as a gift today! I'll post my thoughts once I've read it.

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i'd guess this is what the reviewer meant, there are no known films of Nijinsky as far as i understand it.

There aren't any moving images in them, but I remember them being quite evocative. If I remember correctly, they pre-date work like Ken Burns' use of still images.

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Today in the London Review of Books:

"Moore has written a cool, businesslike introduction to his remarkable life and times, drawing on the full range of vivid memoirs and fervid recollections. It’s true that when you look at the original versions of the passages she paraphrases they are usually much more vivid, but when the events are so brilliant, tragic and poignant, and when what is written about them is so often overwrought, then a proficient and professional guide is just what is needed."

EDITED TO ADD: The link should be fixed now.

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Thanks so much for the heads-up. I don't see the LRB that often. Link didn't work for me -- try this?

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