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Tuesday, September 17


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#1 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:21 PM

Damian Woetzel celebrates the union and talents of Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild for Vanity Fair.

 

This past February she triumphed in the New York Philharmonic’s production of Carousel, and dancing opposite her was a smoldering Fairchild. Like Peck, he grabs your attention and won’t let go. With his sunny, open nature and matinee-idol looks, he can bring to life equally a swaggering cowboy, a dreamy hoofer, or a shy sailor, and in his acclaimed performances of Balanchine’s Apollo he makes the god flesh and blood, full of curiosity, power, and depth.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:31 PM

Articles on Sergei Filin's return to Moscow and the Bolshoi.

 

The Guardian

 

It was almost as if there were nothing unusual about the upcoming season, the theatre's 238th. But the world's media, interspersed among the hundreds of singers, dancers, musicians and support staff who work for the company, were not here to hear the finer details of upcoming operatic stagings: they were here to see the man in the dark glasses, back for the first time since one of the most horrific episodes in the theatre's long history, in January.

 

 

The New York Times

 

At the formal opening ceremony at the theater on Tuesday afternoon, however, Mr. Filin made only brief remarks and focused on describing the season ahead. But he began with a poignant and pointed double-entendre. “First of all I would like to say hello to everybody,” he began. “And I am very glad to see you.”

 

Photo gallery.



#3 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:35 PM

A story on last week's dinner held in celebration of Benjamin Millepied's new job.

One of the highlights of the evening was a performance by violinist Tim Fain, who appeared and collaborated with Mr. Millepied in the film Black Swan. Fain performed selections from “Partita for Solo Violin” to a montage of films directed and choreographed by Mr. Millepied.

 

Guests included President of Vacheron Constantin North America Hugues de Pins, Consul General of France Bertrand Lortholary, Chairman of the American Friends of the Paris Opera & Ballet Olivia Flatto, Renee Fleming, Lesley Stahl, Lily Safra, Anne Bass, Christopher Wheeldon, Sebastien Marcovici, and Janie Taylor.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:40 PM

More articles on Sergei Filin.

 

The Telegraph

 

"My treatment is still going – both eyes are under observation, and from time to time with the agreement of [Bolshoi General Director] Vladimir Urin I will travel to Germany to continue treatment," he told Interfax after the gathering of the company on Tuesday. "I hope I will be released after a short period of observation. Furthermore, there will be periods when I will leave for longer periods – five or six days – when I need to undergo operations. There are several planned."

 

The Moscow Times

 

Reports of financial mismanagement have plagued the theater ever since it underwent a massive renovation, which was completed in 2011 at an estimated cost of $680 million to $1 billion or more. In June, police opened a new embezzlement investigation in connection with the reconstruction.

 

Reuters

 

Blinking through dark glasses under the theatre's bright lights in the gold-encrusted main hall, the 42-year-old thanked his fans for their support. "I feel good and my condition is stable enough to be here at the opening of the season and to take on work," he said, his eyelids visibly swollen.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:47 PM

Commentary on Wayne Sleep's "Big Ballet" project by Nina Bahadur for The Huffington Post.

 

While I applaud the show for bringing diverse bodies to the small screen -- something that we could certainly use more of -- the premise of "Big Ballet" seems restricting, not inspiring. This is not a talent-based show affirming the worth of women of all sizes. By putting "big" dancers in a separate category, the show continues to perpetuate the idea that these less-than-super-skinny bodies would be out of place in a "normal" ballet. "Big Ballet" makes its stars gimmicks rather than simply talented dancers.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:49 PM

Q&A with Toa Fraser, the director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet's film of "Giselle."

 

I have to say Gillian was really leading us that day. She had a great energy, and looked amazing, with her braided hair by New York makeup artist Natalie Young, and she was wearing this great Ingrid Starnes dress. I said to her at the start of the day that she reminds me of working with Sam Neill - that they both make 'offers' in the same way, kind of gently and quietly and if I'm not careful I miss them - and that I would make a real effort to hear her offers in the Catskills. And she made some great ones that day.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 01:55 PM

A review of the shows presented by Fall for Dance at the Delacorte by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

“Red Angels,” by Ulysses Dove, doesn’t belong anywhere. Certainly not in the repertory of New York City Ballet, which sent four of its dancers to represent the company in this inane double duet. That it’s set to a solo for electric violin (played live by Mary Rowell) is its practical justification. Yet, as an attempt at trashy, it isn’t even flashy, and from the troupe with the world’s greatest stock of ballets, it’s a terrible waste. What new dancegoer could fall for it?

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 10:09 AM

Maria Calegari  teaches a master class in November.

 

Following the class, there will be an interview and Q&A session, during which students and the audience may ask Calegari questions about her career in dance. She will share some details of her 20-year career with New York City Ballet and characterize some of the ballet legends who helped her become one of the company’s best known principal dancers.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 10:13 AM

A preview of the Australian Ballet's new "Cinderella."

It is the classic fairytale featuring surrealism-inspired sets and costumes set in 1940s post-war Russia.

Choreographer Alexei Ratmansky says it is the classic love story with an art deco twist.

 

 

Related.

 

Although the story will remain faithful to the classic fairytale - the downtrodden but spirited young woman rescued by love and a little bit of magic - the pumpkin coaches and mice have gone, and the planets and stars instead take centre stage. Jerome Kaplan's sets and costumes are particularly striking: although Ratmansky does not place his ballet in any particular time, Kaplan has used surrealist elements, most colourfully demonstrated by the stepmother and stepsisters, with witty choreography to match their ghastly characters.



#10 dirac

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 10:44 AM

The Israel Ballet emerges from a rocky period. 

 

http://www.jpost.com...n-pointe-326403

 

Earlier this year, the ballet was sent into a tailspin when founder and long-time artistic director Berta Yampolsky was fired. Yampolsky had held tightly to the reins of the ballet for 45 years, drawing much criticism from the community.

While she kept the troupe up and running, her outdated taste and approach to dance left a dark cloud over the company’s north Tel Aviv home.



#11 Helene

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 11:14 PM

Sandra Kurtz writes about the Fall Seattle Dance season for The Seattle Weekly.

 

Fall Arts:  The Hybridization of Dance

 

Right after its Tharp program, PNB will present another collection of works that draw from multiple sources. Jiří Kylián holds much the same place in European dance circles that Tharp does in the U.S.: not the first person to experiment with combining genres, but probably the best known. In his work for the Nederlands Dans Theater, he’s created a body of choreography that companies everywhere long to perform. PNB already has two of his more lighthearted dances, Petit Mort and Sechs Tanze, in its repertory, and is adding the poignant Forgotten Land. We’ll see all three in November, along with a new-to-us work from Pite, Emergence.

 




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