Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Sunday, September 8


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

    Emeralds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,757 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 07:00 AM

David Hallberg is interviewed by Michael Kaiser at the Kennedy Center. Story by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

 

The set could have come straight out of the play “Frost/Nixon,” performed on the Eisenhower stage five years ago: Kaiser and Hallberg in wingback chairs, arranged on an area rug to make the vast space look more intimate. At one point, an overhead screen showed Hallberg’s audition tape for the Paris Opera Ballet’s school at age 16, when the elegant line of the future prince was very much in evidence. A year later, Hallberg landed in Paris, where he spoke no French, had no friends, was teased by other students and, outside of ballet class, was generally miserable. He stuck out the year, then joined ABT.

 

 

 



#2 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

    Emeralds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,757 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 07:16 AM

A review of New Chamber Ballet by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

It’s an amusing ending, but it’s also indicative of Mr. Magloire’s limited sense of drama when he attempts a narrative. He seems to have essentially one idea of a dramatic scenario: a petty power struggle. In “The Letter,” set to Haydn’s Sonata No. 50 in D, the tussle around the piano is between two domestic servants over billets-doux, and the lightness is comedic, if not quite funny. (The charming Ms. Fader earns one laugh by rising from her bench to stomp in exasperation.)

 

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,481 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:39 AM

Eric Underwood  writes in The Guardian on the need for racial diversity in ballet.

 

This means audiences have to change their view of what beauty is. A ballet audience looks at all the girls coming down the ramp in La Bayadère and sees they are all identical – same height, same skin colour, everything exactly the same. They find that incredibly beautiful. But they have to start thinking: "That person looks different – however, this is also incredibly beautiful." This change needs to be collaborative. It takes a creative director to say that it's beautiful; it takes an incredibly strong dancer to know that it's beautiful and exude that on stage; and the audience has to not just see this dancer sticking out of the line, but to see the broken line as beautiful.

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,481 posts

Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:08 AM

Nancy Reynolds receives the 2013 Bessie Award. Thanks to bart for sending in the link!

 

Ms. Reynolds will be recognized for her work as the director of research at the George Balanchine Foundation, where she manages the Balanchine video archives, and as the author of dance history books like “No Fixed Points,” which chronicles ballet, modern and experimental dance in North America and Europe during the 20th century.

 

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):