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Friday, September 6

14 posts in this topic

A preview of the fall season in dance by Julinda Lewis for The Richmond Times-Dispatch.

With the exception of “The Nutcracker” annual holiday extravaganza, the ballet returns to one-week runs of its productions. The Nov. 1-3 anniversary celebration includes the first Richmond Ballet production of a Robbins work. The once scandalous “Rite of Spring” marks its 100th anniversary, and the full-length ballet scheduled for the Valentine’s Day weekend is “Cinderella.”

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Maine State Ballet opens a school.

The school will offer classes starting Sept. 10 for all ages ranging from 3 to teens and adults.

This is the first satellite school for Maine State Ballet, the group said in a news release. Its main school is located in Falmouth.

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Video of Sara Mearns and Ashley Bouder in rehearsal for "Swan Lake."

Go behind the scenes with principal dancers Ashley Bouder and Sara Mearns as they prepare for the iconic role of the Swan Queen, opening September 17, 2013.

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The executive director of the Joffrey Ballet picks some of his favorite eateries.

His plan for success? Being a great listener (says Cameron, “I think it’s incredibly important to be a sponge and listen to the various stakeholders”), and staying connected with colleagues and potential donors at some of his favorite power dining destinations around town.

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A preview of the new season in dance by Siobhan Burke in The New York Times.

FALL FOR DANCE The festival kicks off its 10th anniversary with two free outdoor performances at Central Park’s Delacorte Theater (Sept. 16-17), featuring New York City Ballet, Ronald K. Brown/Evidence, the Paul Taylor Dance Company and Streb Extreme Action. The samplers (and annual scrambling for cheap tickets) continue a week later at City Center (Sept. 25-Oct. 5), with 20 international companies on five programs. A few highlights: the imaginative Irish dancer Colin Dunne, the maverick tap artist Michelle Dorrance and commissioned works by ballet’s most sought-after men of the moment, Justin Peck and Liam Scarlett...

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An interview with Josh Beamish, whose company is performing in Vancouver this weekend.

He relocated to New York City, where his entrepreneurial approach to dance, tenacity and talent quickly led to new opportunities. A creation grant from the Jerome Robbins Foundation was a major building block. So was meeting New York City Ballet principal dancer Wendy Whelan in a ballet class he started attending after making a work for the School of American Ballet in 2010. They discovered they shared a birthday, and an artistic approach. The pas de deux he made for her with NYCB principal Robbie Fairchild became the centrepiece and impetus for pierced.

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Sarah Kaufman's take on the new dance season in The Washington Post.

This is just to name a few highlights. With all of this bounty, how does one make a top pick? Well, I’m taking a leap of faith, as one has to do in matters of the heart. Having witnessed the choreographic skill, poignancy and great fun of his “Swan Lake” and “Edward Scissorhands,” I’m especially looking forward to Matthew Bourne’s arrival here. His “Sleeping Beauty,” to be performed Nov. 12-17 at the Kennedy Center Opera House, by his company New Adventures, is subtitled “a Gothic romance.” Okay! This is not your storybook ballet. Think dark and haunting, tattered lace and a mood that leans to vampiric.

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Alastair Macaulay, similarly, in The New York Times.

This season the Sarasota troupe goes much further. From November to early February, it stages productions of Ashton’s “Illuminations” (1950, made for New York City Ballet) — which hasn’t been danced this century — and his “Sinfonietta” (1967), which hasn’t been performed since Ashton’s death in 1988. Other Ashton ballets follow, above all “Monotones I and II” (Feb. 28 to March 3), his supreme statement of serene, plotless, adagio classicism. Then, May 1 to 5, the company presents an Ashton Festival of 11 ballets. (The Royal Ballet in London dances two all year.) It takes courage and vision to fill a company’s repertory with what you believe in rather than playing it safe; Mr. Webb’s policies show both.

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Brian Seibert's take, also in the Times.

Like Mr. Wheeldon’s “Cinderella,” Mr. Bourne’s “Beauty,” which had its debut in London in December, features ravishing sets and scene-stealing puppetry. Starting the action in the 1890s allows Mr. Bourne to slip in vampires and, after the hundred-year sleep, to end up in a present-day nightclub. Along the way we get period dances, modern dance, even some ballet, but no one expects great choreography from Mr. Bourne, a master of storytelling and defining character through movement.

No one expects it, yet Tchaikovsky’s score seems to demand it. Can this marriage work? Another question for October.

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Reviews of the Houston Ballet's season opener.

Houston Press

If there's one common denominator that links the four pieces in Four Premieres, it's the high-concept nature of the choreography. Take for example James Kudelka's Passion, the one dance I felt appealed both to the intellect and heart. Like the Beethoven concerto it is danced to, Passion is a baroque construction in all its busyness. The composition has no center; the eye shifts between a paired embodiment of idealized love, a paired depiction of what love really is, and five preternaturally pretty ballerinas who move across the stage in a line like carefully placed pearls.

CultureMap Houston

But harnesses strung over shorts were part of Smith's ambitious athleticism. Mere straps and the strength of dancers Oliver Halkowich and Rhodes Elliot kept Nozomi Iijima and Jacquelyn Long swinging in dizzying and dazzling circles. These were only a few of a series of thrilling moments. So what if there were a few too many flashlights on helmets for my taste? Smith made an ambitious selection of John Adams' scores, his well-composed choreography handily withstood the music's awesome force. That's his brand of frenzy delights.

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Louisville Ballet kicks off its season with "Swan Lake."

Later in his career, Simpson took what he had learned, using choreography adapted from Petipa and Beriozoff, to create “Swan Lake” for the Texas Ballet Theater and in 2004 to the Louisville Ballet, which had appointed him as artistic leader two years earlier.

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The New Jersey School of Ballet celebrates its sixtieth anniversary.

The school was founded in 1953 by Elizabeth Clark and Mavis Ray and began operations on the third floor of a building on Main Street in Orange. At the time, the enrollment was about 50 students.

In 2013 — its 60th anniversary — NJSB has more than 900 students taking classes in three locations: Livingston, Somerville and Cedar Knolls.

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Boulder Ballet hires a new executive director.

She replaces Cheri Friedman, whose last day as executive director was June 21. Friedman left the Boulder Ballet to become program coordinator for the Academy of Visual & Performing Arts at Texas A&M. At the time, Friedman said the Boulder Ballet board of directors had appointed development director Lee Stern as interim executive director.

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A style feature on Maria Kochetkova.

Dancewear:
Ballet brands are for kids, not professional dancers. So I sometimes wear American Apparel.

Signature accessory:
Socks in all kinds of prints or in white, in ankle- and knee-high lengths.

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