Jump to content


Thursday, August 15


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 09:07 AM

A Q&A with Daniel Ulbricht on his troupe Stars of American Ballet by Katie Dravenstott for TheaterJones.

 

How did you go about selecting the pieces we will be seeing?

The program is always crucial to the show. The hard part of directing is that you are in charge of creating the audience’s experience. So, I try to think about it as a menu. Not everyone likes the same dish. You need to have something that has sweet for one, salty for another and gluten free. You get the picture. The tough thing with eight people is how to close a program. Most of the dancers will dance twice so you also get to see a different element in their dancing which is fascinating to watch. So, finding a group or ensemble piece is difficult. But after doing some homework I found Jerome Robbins’ Fancy Free to close. I believe it fulfills our artistry and athleticism undertone for the show. It is very American and it is a true masterpiece that many people don’t get the opportunity to see.

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 09:11 AM

Judith Mackrell asks Guardian readers which ballet companies from other countries they'd most like to see.

 

Long may it continue. But there are other companies closer to home with whom UK fans haven't enjoyed such regular contact. The Paris Opera Ballet has a unique and diverse repertory, from elegant stagings of the classics to iconoclastic contemporary work, and an exceptional stable of home-trained dancers. Yet despite being such a near neighbour, we almost never see them in the UK.

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:12 AM

A preview of five tracks  from the premiere recording of Maury Yeston's "Tom Sawyer: A Ballet in Three Acts."

 

Martin West conducts the 70-piece San Francisco Ballet Orchestra for the PS Classics recording, which is produced by two-time Grammy winner Adam Abeshouse. The album is currently available for pre-order at PSClassics.com.

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:15 AM

A look at Olga Smirnova and Semyon Chudin  in rehearsal. Video.

 

Smirnova is coached by Marina Kondratyeva, who also taught another Russian wunderkind Natalia Osipova – and who was, in her dancing days, on the Bolshoi visit to London in 1963. Alexander Vetrov, who mentors Chudin, was a famous Siegfried in Swan Lake himself; he now also coaches David Hallberg, the Bolshoi’s imported American star.

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:19 AM

Reviews of the Shanghai Ballet Company in "Jane Eyre."

 

The Evening Standard

 

But Charlotte Brontë's tale is hugely popular in China and its themes of love, betrayal and redemption translate easily from page to stage.

Choreographer Patrick de Bana’s innovative interpretation elevates Mr Rochester’s first wife, Bertha Mason.

 

 

The Stage

 

Distilled down to its essence by choreographer Patrick de Bana, this version is cleanly danced and full of expressive gesture, even if the storytelling is a little muddy. Each scene works well in isolation with the key central relationships - basically a love triangle between Rochester (Wu Husheng), Jane (Xiang Jieyan) and Rochester’s mad wife Bertha (Fan Xiaofeng) - clearly defined. The representational set is elegantly functional, with screens sliding up and down to represent the moors and Thornfield Hall; the costumes are similarly purposeful without an over-adherence to period.

 

 

The Arts Desk

 

Their frenetic blend of martial art style and ballet, however, brought a welcome lift in tempo and energy, because choreographer Patrick de Bana has mostly gone for a token contemporary/ballet blend. This works best when it moves towards expressionism, or merges with Chinese traditional dance; at other moments the physical storytelling features a little too much running and hair-tossing.

 

Londonist

 

The ballet’s narrative is hard to follow and there are sections that don’t make sense. For example, when Bertha holds her wedding dress at the end of Act I, the intention is to convey her unhappiness and illusion, but the red confetti she is showered with seems at odds with this idea. There are also a number of unclearly-defined characters who make fairly brief appearances and have little chance to assert themselves fully into the storyline. The music is an eclectic mix of composers, from Elgar and Debussy to Britten, and it works better in some sections than others.

 

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:21 AM

A story on the Shanghai troupe's London visit from China Daily.

"We would like to bring a different Jane Eyre to the British audience, and prove that Chinese dancers could not only interpret Chinese stories, but foreign classics as well," said Xin Lili, director of the Shanghai Ballet Company.

 

"We have always hoped to bring Chinese ballet to the world, so we found this story that western people are familiar with and involved foreign staff in our group, as they know better what western audience like," said Zhang Zhe, President of Shanghai Grand Theater Arts Center.

 



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:23 AM

A preview of Ballet Philippines'  44th season.

 

For its 44th season Ballet Philippines presents four major productions to look forward to: the classid and timeless Giselle, the hip and edgy Rock Supremo, the fresh and modern A Christmas Carol, and finale The Art of Dance, which showcases the diversity of the company through a variety of forms.

 



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 15 August 2013 - 10:27 AM

A piece on the challenges  of maintaining repertory and high-quality performance by Phil Chan in The Huffington Post.

 

At first, it may seem like the easy choice to blame poor organization, lazy dancers (if there is indeed such a thing at a professional level), or inexperienced coaches. As someone who is constantly fighting for more rehearsal weeks and resources for my dancers, I know firsthand that the culprit to a cutback in rehearsal weeks is a lack of funding. Productions are increasingly forced to be rushed onstage without adequate rehearsals, and reoccurring repertory is allocated even less time to be re-staged. This is not healthy for our dance companies and there's a disservice to our dance artists, who are more than able to give us inspired performances every night of their seasons.

 



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:09 AM

Ballet photographs by Jesus Chapa-Malacara.

 

He’s a former dancer turned Brooklyn-based photographer who dabbled in children’s portraiture before before slipping into a bit of a creative slump, searching for something new to focus his viewfinder on. “Initially I thought, ‘Not dance. The arabesque has been captured a gazillion times and there's nothing new to explore there.’” Turning his lens back towards ballet, however, enabled him to offer a fresh take on both of his passions.

 



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:10 AM

The Columbus Youth Ballet is robbed.

 

Columbus police say the crooks got away with $27 in cash and left the office with some significant damage.

 



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:31 AM

Tobi Tobias writes on Wendy Whelan in the sunset of her career for her blog, "Seeing Things."

 

In some ways I wish she wouldn’t pursue this activity. In the end, it’s always a sad and losing battle. For other reasons, I hope she will. If ever there were a dancer out to make the most of herself—and expend enormous valor of body and soul in doing so, it is Whelan. May I confess that I would prefer a gentler goodbye? Something like Kyra Nichols’s last few seasons, which made “less is more” piercingly meaningful? No, probably not. The two dancers harbored very disparate souls. At any event the choice is hardly up to me.

 



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 16 August 2013 - 09:52 AM

A story on American exchange students studying at the Bolshoi.

Anna Pearson, 17, came to Moscow from Michigan for the same reasons. “I grew up with Russian ballet and have been taking it since I was 7 year old,” she said.

 

When she was 10 years old she traveled to St Petersburg and the trip had a big impact on her. “I was completely amazed by what I saw when I was really young. … The architecture. The people. The culture. The food. Just the whole experience was really amazing! From that moment I’ve always been more interested in Russian culture.”

 



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 19 August 2013 - 02:14 PM

A National Public Radio interview with Peter Boal  (a one-hour show; Boal's segment is about midway through). Thanks to sandik for sending in the link!

 

Eight years ago the leadership changed hands at Pacific Northwest Ballet. Peter Boal came to Seattle to assume the role of PNB’s artistic director. The former New York City Ballet principal dancer was committed to PNB’s focus on the work of choreographer George Balanchine. But Boal has expanded PNB’s repertoire, bringing in much more new work and focusing on such choreographers as Twyla Tharp and Christopher Wheeldon, hot shots of contemporary dance making.

 



#14 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 20 August 2013 - 10:25 AM

Mikhail Baryshnikov and Lisa Rinehart sell their Upper West Side co-op.

The apartment, which was listed for $1.15 million, sold for $1.265 million.

 

The prewar two-bedroom, 1 1/2-bathroom, 1,125-square-foot unit has high ceilings and a large kitchen overlooking Broadway. Building amenities include a roof deck.

 



#15 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,301 posts

Posted 24 August 2013 - 10:02 PM

Varley O'Connor's "The Master's Muse" is included on the Kirkus list of most overlooked books of 2013.

 

Thoughtful, tender and quite gripping, even for readers unfamiliar with the historical events the author sensitively reimagines.

 

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):