Jump to content


Tuesday, July 30


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:40 AM

Reviews of the Bolshoi Ballet in London.

 

The Telegraph

 

The Bolshoi’s Swan Lake is dazzling in many ways, disappointing in others, and immensely rewarding overall. Certainly, any dance lovers out there who’ve been fretting that the company’s morale might have been broken by the events of this year can rest assured: it is, in fact, looking spirited indeed.

 

 

The Guardian

 

I've never been a fan of Yuri Grigorovich's versions of the classics. His tendency to move the action through undifferentiated blocks of pure dance, cutting out most of the storytelling and mime, does serious damage to these ballets' delicate texture. His 2001 version of Swan Lake wreaks more violence than most.

 

 

The Independent

Zakharova, one of the company’s leading ballerinas, is long-limbed, elegant and frosty. She has presence and strong technique, but doesn’t allow much character to affect her smooth, fluid steps. There’s little sign of the Swan Queen’s vulnerability or yearning for freedom. As Odile, the heroine’s wicked double, she adds glittering virtuosity to a distant persona.

 

As her prince, Volchkov dances and partners efficiently but lacks dash....

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:42 AM

More reviews of the Bolshoi.

 

The Evening Standard

 

But emotionally, the whole thing is off key. Even if this is just the workings of a bewildered Siegfried's imagination, we have to believe in true love, something precious and transcendent. The extra-long-limbed, legs-go-sky-high Svetlana Zakharova plays the two swans, Odette and Odile, nailing the steps with zero emotion. She plays the white swan Odette as a blank slate, which might be the intention, but it's not very engrossing to watch.

 

The Arts Desk

 

Quite a bit of the problem is Grigorovich’s contrary ignoring of the dramatic climaxes that Tchaikovsky puts in the music, and therefore the reducing of key moments. Both Odette’s and Odile’s entries are mangled by cackhanded musical changes that Grigorovich has used to pre-empt and spoil the great familiar moments he intends to keep from the Ivanov-Petipa original work. The net effect of a fair number of such mistimings is that the plot points are obscured, the thread of emotional suspense is mislaid, and the story becomes just a conveyor belt for the ritual images rather than a narrative arising out of and with the music.

 

The Stage

 

The corps de ballet are, as always, drilled to within an inch of their fingertips. Sweeping and hopping in unison, flowing like liquid alabaster through their sequences - even the uninspired additions by Grigorovich who also messes around with Tchaikovsky’s score to the extent that there was one sequence I didn’t recognise at all. The Bolshoi orchestra - especially the solo violins - are, however, on song throughout.

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:43 AM

Backstage with the Bolshoi. Video.

 

Prima ballerina Ekaterina Krysanova talks exclusively to the Telegraph about the rigours of training for one of Russia’s greatest ballets.

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:46 AM

A news story noting the Bolshoi's fiftieth anniversary. Video.

 

"I think the Bolshoi Ballet, the Russian Ballet, always represented Russian spirit and Russian music and that's why I think it can be considered the greatest achievement of our culture," Principal dancer Ekaterina Shipulina says.

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:49 AM

Vladimir Urin warns of "star illness" in an interview with Rosa Silverman in The Telegraph.

“In the theatre, if you have such a great bunch of talented people with egos, you always will have passion so I don’t rely on having this quiet, nice life.”

 

He did plan to tackle the problem of dancers seeing themselves as stars, however, he said.

 

“To my regret I have to say this star illness does exist and to fight with this I surely must,” he said.

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:52 AM

An interview with Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild.

 

“I remember my first day of class at the New York City Ballet, and being there with all of the people that I idolized,” recalls Peck. “We watched them so often when we were in school, but then to be standing next to Wendy Whelan in class was amazing. I think the first ballet I did was Symphony in C and I shared the stage with a lot of principals. It was surreal.”

 

“My first ballet was A Midsummer Night’s Dream. I was in the court scene in the second act,” muses Fairchild. “I remember the first time I saw the New York City Ballet dance, other than the The Nutcracker, was A Midsummer Night’s Dream. After seeing that performance, I thought, ‘that’s what I really want do. I want to be in that ballet company.’”

 



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:53 AM

An obituary for Fernando Alonso.

Under Fernando Alonso’s remarkable curriculum, Havana became internationally renowned for its ballet training, despite material deprivations. In the early 1960s Cuba’s young ballerinas were regularly winning gold medals in Soviet competitions, and the Bolshoi Ballet, impressed, started exchanges of dancers and teachers.

 

However, as Alicia became more autocratic as head of the Cuban National Ballet, relations with her husband and daughter broke down. In 1975, after they divorced, Fernando set up a ballet school and company in Camagüey, which is now Cuba’s second ballet company, though not permitted by the government to tour abroad.

 



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:05 AM

A review of Amy Seiwert's Imagery by Carla Escoda in The Huffington Post.

 

The piece with the most moving premise was Val Caniparoli's Triptych, inspired by a series of portraits of British servicemen entitled "We Are The Not Dead" by photojournalist Lalage Snow, who was recently embedded in Afghanistan. Throughout the piece, the dancers mostly face the audience squarely -- as opposed to the angled body facings that predominate in classical ballet -- with expressions on their faces that range from blank, to tense, to quietly terrified.

 



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:06 AM

Deborah Vinton, the founder and director of the defunct West Coast Civic Ballet, starts a new venture.

 

WCCB, a nonprofit community dance organization, began its dissolution in June after Vinton and the board could not come to an agreement regarding the future and direction of the company.

 



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:12 AM

A review of the Sofia National Ballet in 'Giselle' by Georgina Butler for The Bicester Advertiser & Review.

Vesa Tonova as Giselle brings an expressive sparkle to the stage and subtly conveys the underlying heart condition that precedes Giselle’s untimely death.

 

(Some versions do not allude to ill-health but Sofia National Ballet’s choreography repeatedly draws attention to Giselle’s shortness of breath and dizziness and the concern this elicits from those around her.)

 



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:14 AM

A piece on the significance of Jacob's Pillow by Andrea d'Annunzio for Broadway World's blog.

 

In the summer of 1941 Shawn leased the Pillow to Alicia Markova and Anton Dolin, who were international stars of ballet, for an "International Dance Festival." Performances were held in the barn studio and the Festival was so successful that the Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival was born. The Festival has occurred every summer since 1941, making it the oldest dance festival in America.

 



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:30 AM

A review of the White Nights Festival by Laura Cappelle in The Financial Times.

For the Mariinsky Ballet, however, it’s not all good news. Gergiev has pledged a dramatic increase in the theatre’s tally of performances, up to 1,000 a year (twice the Bolshoi’s output, the boasting goes), and plans to hire 60 extra dancers. Top-drawer Vaganova-trained performers don’t grow on trees, however, and the final week of this year’s Stars of the White Nights Festival brought worrying signs that quantity is in danger of overshadowing quality.

 



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:32 AM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in "Swan Lake" by Clement Crisp in The Financial Times.

 
Performances, you will be in no way surprised to hear, are variously splendid. The company is in admirable form, whether as swans or courtiers or visiting princesses (my heart torn between the ravishing presences of Anna Tikhomirova or Anna Leonova, Siegfried’s potential Spanish and Polish brides). And Svetlana Zakharova was the Odette/Odile. Her line is febrile, exact, showing the drama in finest outline, unfailing in Odile’s demonic bravura, yet most potent in the elegiac final scene, with grief-saturated dance. Her Siegfried was the decent Alexander Volchkov, and altogether too decent for the storm in which he finds himself.....

 



#14 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:44 AM

Steelers nose tackle Steve McLendon  talks about how ballet classes have helped him in football.

 

McLendon began taking a ballet class his senior year at Troy University in Alabama to pick up what he thought might be a few easy credits. There was nothing easy about it for the biggest and only male dancer in a class of about a dozen. But his instructor kept telling him it would help him in football, and he discovered she was correct.

 

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):