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Thursday, July 11


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#1 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:04 AM

A preview  of the week in dance by Ann Haskins for LA Weekly.

 

.....The change to a pas de deux, like the ballet's plot, is not receptive to deep thinking. ABT's more serious, thoughtful side was on view at Thursday’s opening, a mixed bill boasting George Balanchine's Apollo and Symphony in C plus Chamber Symphony from ABT's current resident choreographer Alexei Ratmansky. In contrast, Le Corsaire is best approached as a terpsichorean roller coaster ride as ABT turns its dancers loose in this swashbuckling extravaganza......

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:05 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Jay Rogoff in The Saratogian.

 

Three women emerge as soloists, with Sara Mearns earning special attention when she enters late and seeks her place. Rebecca Krohn and Savannah Lowery also solo, bang on the music, Krohn with nervous energy and Lowery with fresh confidence. But Mearns waltzes superbly with Jonathan Stafford, then dramatically throws her head back, leading the corps. “Just do the steps, dear,” Balanchine would say, but Mearns’ subtle acting intensifies her technical power, clarifying the choreography’s emotional depth.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:14 AM

An interview with Mikhail Baryshnikov.

 

That eye for experiment has been there from the start. “Being a classical dancer, there was a certain moment in my early 30s, when I realised if I didn’t do experimental work and just preserved my body, I could have danced ‘Giselle’ until I was probably 50 years old.” For some dancers, he says, that would have been a fulfilling life. But he chose differently. “I abused my body,” he says. “I went to certain extremes. I had 12 operations, just pushing it, being stupid a little bit, but it was interesting.”

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:17 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre  in "The Sleeping Beauty" by Barnett Serchuk for Broadway World.

 

A major problem for serious music devotees was the orchestral playing. It was bad, and I'm being nice. There are times when all you could hear was a thumping that sounded like a bad tuba player. The worst affront to Tchaikovsky, and to the leading ballerina dancing the Rose Adagio, was the booming sound of a drum roll. Where were the strings and brass players? This is the time when the music is of paramount importance; it swells to suggest a young girl's coming of age and her entrance into womanhood; it's not Sousa or Irving Berlin's This is the Army. I wanted the music that manifests the grandiosity and supremacy of a prima ballerina. No, a drum roll will just not hack it.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 04:56 PM

Q&A with Ralph Ippolito.

 

What is the best part about being a New York City Ballet dancer?

Being a part of this company is amazing for many reasons. The repertory we get to perform is unlike any other company. I feel so lucky to dance great ballets alongside great dancers. The company is really talented throughout, from apprentices to principals. Looking around the room in class or on stage, I am constantly inspired. The company also gets to travel around the world. Tours are special because not only are we traveling to a new and exciting place, but we are also working in that specific place. It’s always fun to feel like you are giving back to the community in a cultural way, even when the company is touring in, say, Paris or Tokyo.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 02:01 PM

Is Sergei Polunin the world's greatest dancer? asks Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

 

Editors love hyperbole, and Polunin isn't the first or the last dancer to be vamped up with superlatives. But what can it mean to call any performer the best? For a male classical dancer like Polunin, it's a huge ask to excel at everything: at every aspect of academic technique, at acting, at partnering, and at cutting a glamorous figure on stage.

 




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