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Thursday, July 4


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#1 dirac

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:19 AM

A c olumn on digital dance  by Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

 

A new dance company has been launched this week – but Crystal Ballet is not a performance troupe, it's a production company dedicated to the creation and filming of new dance works for the small screen. For £15, its debut ballet, Genesis, can be downloaded on to any iPad, computer or mobile phone; and the cast list alone suggests it is cheap at the price, with Alina Cojocaru, Steven McRae, Sarah Lamb and Vadim Muntagirov featured among its seven dancers. The choreography is by Kim Brandstrup and Ernst Meisner, and according to artistic director Henry St Clair it has been filmed in such a way as to maximise the dynamism and impact of a live show.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:22 AM

Northern Ballet   invites the public to a sneak preview of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."

 

The event is an opportunity to get a taste for the production and to see Northern Ballet’s dancers up close. Attendees will also receive a complimentary glass of wine or soft drink and a voucher for a free programme, worth £5, redeemable at the West Yorkshire Playhouse when attending any performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream from September 6-14.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:28 AM

Reviews of Boston Ballet in London.

 

The Financial Times

 

The remaining work is by Boston’s resident choreographer, Jorma Elo. Set to some extremely vivacious, if short-breathed, baroque fiddling by Heinrich von Biber, it proposes that energetically modish scampering that passes for today’s classic manner and is little more than gymnastics with ideas above its station.......

 

 

The Guardian

 

It's 30 years since Boston last performed in London, so for many of us it's effectively their first visit. In the company's opening programme, the revelation comes from seeing them in work by their resident choreographer Jorma Elo. In the past I've been unconvinced by Elo, finding his style tricksy and unmusical. But I've only viewed it on companies other than Boston – and with his home dancers, the style comes into natural focus.....

 

 

The Independent

 

L’Après-midi d’un faune is both lush and angular, with sun-baked scenery by Bakst and Nijinsky’s angled Greek vase poses. This was a careful performance, with Altan Dugaraa as a sly faun to Lorna Feijóo’s wide-eyed Nymph.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:33 AM

More reviews of Boston Ballet.

 

The Telegraph

 

And in that, they succeed. Premiered here on Wednesday, Programme 1 (of two) is an intelligently constructed, flawed, but still warmly recommendable evening. Bookended by works from the start and end of Balanchine’s career (1934’s Serenade and 1972’s Symphony in Three Movements), it also includes the stylised sensual languor of the Ballets Russes’ Afternoon of a Faun as well as a bracing piece of contemporanea in the form of Plan to B, by resident choreographer Jorma Elo.

 

 

The Evening Standard

 

The same hungry energy fizzes from the dancers in an earlier Balanchine piece, the pretty Serenade, where girls whip across the stage like a welcome summer breeze (principal Misa Kuranaga is especially breezy) in Jormo Elo’s tastefully contemporary Plan to B, as Jeffery Cirio’s legs fly in karate kicks and he turns on a fast spin cycle against the steady strings of Baroque composer Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber.

 

 

Londonist

 

The weakest work, Balanchine’s Symphony in Three Movements (pictured), closed the evening. Accompanied by an impenetrable score by Stravinsky, 32 dancers in monochrome and pink practice clothes performed numerous large jumps and bouncy runs. The choreography felt rushed and repetitive, and the stage was often overcrowded with different dancers performing conflicting movements.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 04:27 PM

The Royal Ballet takes "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" to Japan.

 

Balletomanes hungry for more traditional fare will have the option of seeing Anthony Dowell’s definitive production of “Swan Lake,” which will run July 12-14, as well as “A Gala Evening with The Royal Ballet” sandwiched between those two other works on July 10.

 

 




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