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ABT 2013 Sleeping Beauty at the Met


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#106 puppytreats

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 06:12 AM

Is the story different when it uses Prince Florimund as opposed to Prince Desire, or are they supposed to be the same character? 



#107 rg

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:02 AM

Aurora's prince in traditional stagings of THE SLEEPING BEAUTY is named either Florimund or Desire depending on the production.

in general, stagings with an English pedigree tend to use Florimund, Robin Cousins "SLEEPING BEAUTY, an Ice Spectacular" used this name as well. One Kirov Ballet video of SLEEPING BEAUTY with Asylmuratova and Zaklinsky also uses the name for Zaklinsky's prince.

NYPL listings for stagings by Andre Eglevsky show the use of Florimund, as well, ditto one by Fernando Bujones.

in general however, Russian-lineage productions tend to use Desire, which is what Petipa and Tchaikovsky called their prince.



#108 RUKen

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:05 AM

Is the story different when it uses Prince Florimund as opposed to Prince Desire, or are they supposed to be the same character? 

You forgot Prince Charming.  It seems that the Lilac Fairy brought a parade of princes to the dormant princess.

 

(I have nothing to add to rg's response, which was posted as I was replying.)



#109 mussel

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:09 AM

Prince Charming is a character in Cinderella, although he appears in the 3rd act divertissement, he has nothing to with Aurora.



#110 rg

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:30 AM

also re: Florimund vs. Désiré [just found my accent options], for his production of THE SLEEPING BEAUTY Rudolf Nureyev chose Florimund over Désiré, perhaps due to his interim years working with the Royal Ballet.

in Louis XV Bourbon France, the dauphin, who would become Louis XVI was known as "Louis le Désiré."



#111 puppytreats

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:38 AM

So it is like Maria, Masha, and Clara in "Nutcracker"?

 

Are Blue Bird's feet supposed to flex and not point during the beats, like the jesters' in Act II of "Sylvia"?  Or did the dancer that I saw just have floppy, unpointed feet?



#112 mussel

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 08:57 AM

Masha is Russian nickname for Maria, like Billy is a nickname for William.  I don't recall anyone used Clara beside Balanchine's Nutcracker.



#113 silvermash

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 09:40 AM

Masha is Russian nickname for Maria, like Billy is a nickname for William.  I don't recall anyone used Clara beside Balanchine's Nutcracker.

 

Nureyev used Clara as well in his Nutcracker



#114 Rose1186

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:11 AM

Off topic, but just further on this... She is called Clara in Baryshnikov's Nutcracker (I think I watched this video 200 times when I was little) and Ratmansky's is Clara as well!!  Also, I remember the name being Marie (not Maria) in other versions, but obviously possible that all of the above have been used!



#115 rg

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 11:41 AM

Though the Balanchine catalog of works doesn't seem to note it, sometime after the 1954 premiere of his production of THE NUTCRACKER he reverted to Marie for the name of his little heroine from Clara, which he used initially.

Clara is used in the Petipa/Tchaikovsky plan for the first production of THE NUTCRACKER. 

Hoffmann's herione is named Marie; Clara is the name of one of Marie's dolls in Hoffmann's Nutcracker-source tale.



#116 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 12:14 PM

The heroine's name and last name has varied as follows:

 

Hoffmann= Marie Stahlbaum

Dumas= Marie Silberhaus

Vsevolozhsky= Clara Silberhaus



#117 kfw

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 12:24 PM

Though the Balanchine catalog of works doesn't seem to note it, sometime after the 1954 premiere of his production of THE NUTCRACKER he reverted to Marie for the name of his little heroine from Clara, which he used initially.

 

 

She was still Clara in the 1958 Playhouse 90 broadcast of NYCB's Nutcracker.



#118 rg

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 12:41 PM

indeed. re: Playhouse 90. 

perhaps the change came with Ter-Arutunian's design scheme for the New York State Theater in '64?

if mem. serves, Marie has been in place at least since my first look at the production in 1970.



#119 kfw

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 01:15 PM

indeed. re: Playhouse 90. 

perhaps the change came with Ter-Arutunian's design scheme for the New York State Theater in '64?

 

Repertory in Review seems to indicate that the change occurred then. In regards to the changes when the company moved to the larger stage, Reynolds mentions

 

a new ending in which the Little Princess (now named Mary) and the Nutcracker Prince exit to the sky in a Christmas sleigh . . .

 

 

But "Mary"? The "Little Princess" as a title, not an Act Two designation? 



#120 rg

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 01:25 PM

one would have to check programs, i suppose, or the clear memories of those who were around in those days, but I recall people around NYCB involved with the preparation of the child dancers for their roles referring to Marie as "Little Mary" - perhaps that was a nickname for those in the company.

indeed, on checking a recent NYCB program, while in act one the names Marie and Fritz are used as is "His Nephew [The Nutcracker]" in cast list, for act two the same characters are called The Little Princess and The Little Prince.

i know of no name per se given to the nephew in any traditional staging of THE NUTCRACKER. 

by the end of the 1892 libretto, The Nutcracker is referred to as Prince Nutcracker.




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