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Tuesday, June 25


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#1 dirac

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:40 AM

A review of the cinema broadcast of the Paris Opera Ballet  in "Don Quixote" by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

As expected, the POB dancers’ clarity in petit allegro is a special treat. Héloïse Bourdon is a wooden Queen of the Dryads, but another little "sujet," Charline Giezendanner (strangely uncredited), brings her "demoiselle d’honneur" variation stunningly to life.

 

The digital technology makes some things surprisingly clear, like the moment during which the toreador Espada’s lips graze those of the Street Dancer. Yet sudden camera movements also create a blur, and parts of the stage may be out of focus. The great thing about ballet dancers, as opposed to opera singers, is that they move. The filmmakers should get used to it.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:41 AM

An interview with Paul Ghiselin.

 

It wasn't an easy transition. Ghiselin said, "The adjustment was really hard. I was thirty-three at the time. Putting on pointe shoes at thirty-three is kind of stupid but I just did it, little by little. It was tricky, it's a whole different way of working. I felt so far away from the planet on pointe, like I was walking on stilts. I have to say, I really didn't know what I was doing. I had the technique of dance but I didn't know what I was doing with the rest of my body when I was in pointe shoes." Girls generally start in pointe shoes at age eleven or twelve and then spend years training before trying to do the things that the Trocks have to do every night. Dobrin hired a woman from Cleveland Ballet to come and work with his dancers and that helped to get Ghiselin working the right way. It was like learning to dance all over again.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:45 AM

All things Estonian  are spotlighted in San Francisco this week.

 

Helimets, a star principal dancer of the San Francisco Ballet, born and raised in Estonia, is the Estonian National Ballet's company manager in the U.S. and the artistic director for an gala in the Palace of Fine Arts on June 28. This is the 94-year-old national company's first appearance here.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:46 AM

Alicia Alonso will be honored in South Africa.

 

Performances are scheduled for Friday through Sunday at the Montecasino Theater of Johannesburg and will also celebrate the 65th anniversary of the founding of Cuba’s National Ballet Company, the www.radioreloj.cu Web site reported.

 

 

Related.

 

Director of South African Mzansi Ballet, Dirk Badenhorst is in charge of the gala, which includes the leading dancers and prima ballerinas from the BNC Anette Delgado, Viengsay Valdes, Sadaise Arencibia, Dani Hernandez, Jose Losada and Arian Molina.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:49 AM

An obituary for and appreciation of David Wall by Mary Brennan in The Herald (Scotland).

 

Lescaut, the titular heroine's depraved and manipulative brother, sounds – on paper anyway – a far from attractive proposition. But Wall transcended predictable sleaze, bringing a casually amoral, relaxed charm to the half-comic/half-sinister persona that MacMillan had choreographed. But that all changed when the casts switched over their roles and Wall took on Des Grieux, the hapless innocent who falls in love with the fickle, whoring Manon. Wall danced him just as superbly, charting the fall from grace that sees a serious divinity student become a frantic killer without ever jeopardising our understanding or our sympathy.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 10:56 AM

Reviews of  American Ballet Theatre in Sylvia.

 

The Financial Times

 

 In Sylvia, it is the man who first begs for love. Shepherd Aminta flattens his body into wide, straight lines that make him seem less open-hearted than one-dimensional. Marcelo Gomes executed the thankless steps impeccably. But perhaps out of loyalty to bland Aminta, he ironed out his trademark luxuriance. Only dullards pine for the impossible, Ashton suggests. The likes of Sylvia and her rapacious admirer Orion seize the moment.

 

danceviewtimes

 

The sun, the moon, and the stars were all out for ABT's opening night performance, led by Gillian Murphy and Marcelo Gomes. Murphy was commanding in the opening "I am woman, hear me roar" jumps, and with her defiant gestures, made her disdain for the god Eros clear. Her fellow huntresses were cast from strength (most were soloists) and sailed through the difficult choreography--turning fouettes in unison while holding a bow over your head can't be easy. She conveyed Sylvia's changing moods very well, and used her eyes so beautifully as the smitten victim of Eros's arrow bourréing back on stage to find Aminta's body.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 12:58 PM

A review of ABT  by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

The ballet needs a prima ballerina at the height of her powers; on Monday Gillian Murphy was at her finest. It comes as no surprise that she has the blazing clarity, the air-cleaving jumps, the dazzling turns and the plunging, hopping, complex footwork; what made all this doubly marvelous, especially in Act III, was the plasticity of her torso.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 01:35 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet  and PNB's school performance by Helene Kaplan for danceviewtimes.

 

During curtain calls for "Mozart Pieces", his three colleagues in the male quartet pushed Rollofson forward to take a solo bow in his final performance with the company. He had come up through the School and once said in a post-performance Q&A that he had danced every male role in "The Nutcracker" except Drosselmeier and Prince. I was lucky to see him do many of them. He was an eye-catcher, and he gave depth to the male corps. Rollofson is not retiring, which is great news for the audience wherever he dances next.

 




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