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Friday, June 21


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#1 dirac

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 10:56 AM

Mikhail Baryshnikov gives the commencement address at Northwestern University.

Speaking at Northwestern's 155th commencement ceremony, Baryshnikov stressed NU's new alumni "don't have to be brilliant 24/7" but should continue to pose tough, often unanswerable, questions about their surroundings and who they are.

 

"The more you see life as complicated and full of contradictions, the better you will understand yourself," he said.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 11:04 AM

Reviews  of "Britten Dances" at the Aldeburgh Festival.

 

The Independent

 

Set to Britten’s Young Apollo, Ashley Page’s If Memory Serves has Laura Hidalgo as a mermaid at play, dancing with three young men. It’s slight but sprightly, with references to Balanchine’s 'Apollo'. Ben Pope conducts the Britten Sinfonia in a brisk account of the score.

 

 

The Guardian

 

Both ballets serve Britten beautifully; less so Courting the Senses, Page's slightly predictable deconstruction of a courtly duet, and Cameron McMillan's Dream Weaver, whose layering of classical and contemporary languages flares into moments of promisingly fierce invention, but also loses its way in inconsequential repetition.

 

 

EADT 24

 

The final ballet, from the Royal Ballet, was a world premiere – Kim Brandstrup’s Ceremony of Innocence to Variations on a Theme by Frank Bridge. The title is derived from a line in a WB Yeats’ poem. This was a beautifully conceived piece with stunningly magical designs from Leo Warner (video) and Jordan Tuinman (lighting). There is a narrative of sorts. An older couple, Edward Watson and Mara Galeazzi, appear to mourn the loss or absence of younger man – a child, maybe, or simply the embodiment of a lost innocence. The whole piece is pervaded by a shadowy nostalgia – with a chorus of two couples interwoven in the action, ghosts of a happier past.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 21 June 2013 - 11:05 AM

A video interview with Kim Brandstrup and Mara Galeazzi.

 

Choreographer Kim Brandstrup and Royal Ballet principal dancer Mara Galeazzi discuss their new Benjamin Britten evening for the Aldeburgh Festival.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 05:20 PM

A review of Dance Theatre of Harlem by Deborah Jowitt in her blog, "DanceBeat."

 

...In this duet, the Swan Queen’s evil double must lure Prince Siegfried to his downfall, and when Michaela DePrince danced the role at the Pillow’s opening Gala, I thought that she was only trying to wow him with her rock-solid technique. But this vastly gifted dancer (born in Sierra Leone and raised in the U.S. from an early age) came alive during DTH’s first night. Now we see how a balance on one toe can become a flirtatious taunt, a kind of purr, and how the ballerina’s every move is aimed to deceive the prince into thinking her far sweeter than she is. No wonder DePrince’s partner (the excellent Samuel Wilson) keeps pressing his hands to his heart and sighing in pleasure.

 



#5 Helene

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 12:15 PM

Thanks to the heads up from Batsuchan: an interview with Guillaume Cote in The Globe and Mail.
 

Did you study music?

Yes. I played seven years of piano and I took composition courses at the Royal Conservatory of Music. That was really to help me compose ballet music which I had started to do for [dancer-turned-choreographer] Dominique Dumais for her in Germany, for the Stuttgart Ballet. Ive since done ballet scores for American Ballet Theatre and the Alberta Ballet as well. Ive also studied classical guitar for six years. And I was part of a rock band called The Neurotics.



#6 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 10:35 AM

A preview of "A Dancer's Dream," featuring Sara Mearns.

“A Dancer’s Dream,” which is directed and designed by Doug Fitch and features choreography by Karole Armitage, opens Thursday at Avery Fisher Hall. It’s the third collaboration between the New York Philharmonic and Giants Are Small, a daring company, whose founders include Mr. Fitch and the producer Edouard Getaz, that deploys a fanciful mix of puppetry and film while making a stage pulsate with movement.

 

.....The first half of “Dream” is based on the Hans Christian Andersen tale “The Ice Maiden,” in which a boy is cursed by a fairy’s kiss, and the second half on “Petrushka,” the tragic tale of a puppet that falls in love with a ballerina. Ms. Mearns is first seen sitting in the audience; transported by the music, she ends up onstage, crossing from reality into make-believe.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 04:30 PM

An interview with Simone Messmer  by Gia Kourlas in Time Out New York.

 

Time Out New York: If that.
Simone Messmer:
Yeah, if that. And that is not how you grow. It’s just not. You look at the likes of Alex [Alessandra] Ferri and Nina [Ananiashvili], and the people that were guesting when I joined. The shows were different every night. It was something special that you got to witness, and you were a part of it. And now I think the guest artists are, for the most part, really beautiful dancers, but they’re not given rehearsal time either. They’re not treated necessarily as part of the company because they’re in for a week, out for a week. And they can’t change their show the way they want to because they’re not as comfortable as they should be. I want to have something more, that’s all there is to it. I don’t have any interest in bad-mouthing the organization because really I have a career that people would kill for. I have a rep that’s pretty amazing at ABT versatility-wise. But it’s just not enough for me, and that soloist rank right now is such a difficult and unhappy place to be. We all want more. It’s the hardest place to be in a ballet company. So what do you do? You ask for more and you don’t get it.

 




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