Jump to content


Wednesday, June 19


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:30 AM

Obituaries for David Wall, who died yesterday at age 67.

 

The Independent

 

Wall, who was a regular partner to Dame Margot Fonteyn (1919 - 1991), became the Royal Ballet’s youngest principal aged 21 in 1966, having joined the touring company just three years earlier.

 

 

Reuters

 

Wall is survived by his wife Alfreda Thorogood, also a former principal dancer with the Royal Ballet, their two children and grandchildren.

 

 

The Guardian

 

David Wall, who has died of cancer aged 67, was one of the Royal Ballet's most outstanding dancers. Widely known for creating the role of Crown Prince Rudolf in Kenneth MacMillan's ballet Mayerling – possibly the most arduous for a male dancer in the entire dance repertory – he was also outstanding in classical, romantic and humorous parts.

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:37 AM

Several pieces in The Telegraph:

 

Obit

Wall, who retired from the Royal Ballet in 1984 and was awarded the CBE, died from cancer on Tuesday June 18 at his family home in Croydon, south London.

 

 

An appreciation by Rupert Christiansen.

 

Red-blooded heterosexuality was always part of his appeal too: in the Sixties, the majority of British male ballet dancers seemed effete, much to the frustration of choreographers: Wall followed in the line of David Blair and Christopher Gable in his ability to project something rougher and tougher.

 

 

Reprint of an interview  with Mark Monahan from last year.

I’ve read that you said working on Mayerling was so strenuous that it took five years off your performing career. Were you being entirely serious?

 

I don’t know … No, probably not. No, it didn’t. I mean, we’re talking 34 years ago. We didn’t have the sort of facilities that the dancers have today: ie the aftercare or the pre-care, but the knowledge of the body in those days was very very minimal. And the day after a performance of Mayerling I used to feel as though I’d been run over by a steamroller, and was incapable of doing very much afterwards. Whenever the schedules came up, I was never scheduled a back-to-back performance of Mayerling. It wouldn’t have been possible, not then. And also, there was also that emotional draw that it demanded. Sleep was something that I didn’t really contemplate after performing Mayerling, because I was so on edge emotionally.

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:38 AM

An obituary for David Wall from BBC News.

 

Wall, who was awarded the CBE, was a regular partner to Dame Margot Fonteyn.

 

 

The Evening Standard

 

Wall was the youngest male dancer to reach the highest level of the Royal Ballet when he was made a principal at the age of 21. Born in Chiswick, he started dancing at primary school in Windsor and won a place at the Royal Ballet School. There, at 10, he met Alfreda Thorogood, who would become his wife.

 

 

Photo gallery.

 

Renowned for his good looks and superb technique, David Wall – who has died of cancer aged 67 – was once, at 20, the youngest principal the Royal Ballet had ever seen. A regular partner to Dame Margot Fonteyn before retiring in 1984, he is widely known for creating the role of Crown Prince Rudolf in Kenneth MacMillan's Mayerling – possibly the most arduous for a male dancer in the entire repertory. Here's a selection of images from a glittering career.

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:48 AM

Reviews of The Forsythe Company.

 

The Evening Standard

 

The main is a new work, made up of old ones. Study #3 is a collection of elements from pieces spanning 30 years of Forsythe’s career, repurposed into something that looks as if it’s been cooked up in the studio last week. A little half-cooked, perhaps....

 

 

The Telegraph

 

 It is, however, more than legitimate to call oneself a profound lover of dance and yet have problems with much of Forsythe’s more conspicuously postmodern output, first for Ballet Frankfurt, and more recently for his own Forsythe Company. These can often have you admiring the constant, iconoclastic stream of creativity while also craving far more in the form of emotional involvement or, to put it more bluntly still, entertainment. And it is firmly into this latter category that the two pieces of his in Sadler’s Wells’ current bill fall.

 

 

The Guardian

 

On the surface, Forsythe's current double bill appears to look back over this career: the short opening piece, N.N.N.N., is from 2002, and the new Study # 3 is a compilation of snippets from 27 works dating back 30 years. But as the works play out, a more rigorous, impersonal logic comes to the fore: this programme is about connecting not dance with music exactly, but movement with sound.

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 09:49 AM

A review of The Forsythe Company  by Neil Norman for The Stage.

 

..... Individual dancers take it in turns to intone or articulate largely unintelligible words into the microphone while the company attempts to interpret them. At times, it appears utterly random but closer inspection reveals a blueprint on which the dancers interpolate their own specific gestures while the lineaments of classical ballet peep through.

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:12 AM

A story on the controversy surrounding the appointment of a new artistic director to the Cairo Opera House.

...According to Erminia Kamel, Artistic Director of the [Cairo Opera Ballet], she cannot freeze activities especially in the face of threats that are placed on ballet as an art form by right-wing Islamists.

 

"I have a responsibility towards over 80 dancers. They need to continue having jobs and they want to prove that ballet matters," Kamel comments. The future of ballet is not yet clear. So far the attack on ballet has been restricted to some provocative statements by a member of the Shura Council (upper house of the Egyptian parliament), calling ballet "an art of nudity" and demanding that it should be banned.

 



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 19 June 2013 - 10:49 AM

A story on the Bolshoi's dismissal of Nikolai Tsiskaridze by Anna Gordeeva for Russia Beyond the Headlines.

What plans does Tsiskaridze have now? He won’t give any comments, but it’s clear that he won’t be left without a job. Some unofficial offers have already been made. Charles Jude, ballet director at the Bordeaux National Opera (a star dancer at the Paris Opera, who worked with Nureyev), who is currently in Moscow, has said that he would be happy to see the Russian dancer in his theatre.

 

Will Tsiskaridze become a huge loss for the Bolshoi? Ballet fans are certain that he will – on Saturday 15 June, about 200 Tsiskaridze fans staged a picket demanding a five-year extension of his contract at the Bolshoi.

 



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 20 June 2013 - 02:07 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in 'Swan Lake' by Tom Phillips for danceviewtimes.

 

Part's Odile is better than her Odette, at least in this cast where she exuded far more presence than her partner. Her solo allegro passages were brilliant, the pique turns sparkling like a big diamond ring. In the adagios her lines were occasionally lumpy, but the climactic arabesques generous and sure. The 32 fouettes, though, looked hurried and not fully extended, even at a relatively slow tempo set by Ormsby Wilkins.

 



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:00 PM

A story on Jose Manuel Carreno's appointment as artistic director of San Jose Ballet by Allan Ulrich in The San Francisco Chronicle.

 

During Carreño's guest stint earlier this year, the possibility of his running the company arose, according to Millicent Powers, the chair of Ballet San Jose's Board of Trustees. "Watching José working with the dancers, watching them respond to him, it became apparent that he was the one," she said by phone. "It has been a natural process." Powers cited his work with young (ages 11-20), emerging dancers, notably at the Carreño Dance Festival, based in Sarasota, Fla.

 



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 20 June 2013 - 10:08 PM

The Royal New Zealand Ballet  announces guest artists for its new season.

 

  Joining King-Wall and Scott are two more famed international performers, Carla Körbes and Karel Cruz from the Pacific Northwest Ballet. They have both stated that they are looking forward to visiting New Zealand and working with the RNZB’s artistic director, Ethan Stiefel.

 

 



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 22 June 2013 - 05:15 PM

A recording of Maury Yeston's "Tom Sawyer - A Ballet in Three Acts" is made with the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra.

 

Adapted from Mark Twain's classic novel, Tom Sawyer received its premiere in October 2011 with the Kansas City Ballet and the Kansas Symphony. It featured direction and choreography by William Whitener.

 

 



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,227 posts

Posted 22 June 2013 - 05:17 PM

Judith Mackrell is dazzled by the whiteness of dancers' teeth, and not in a good way.

 

When a dancer is barrelling around the stage in a bravura classical variation, he is meant to impress. But if he's flashing a fluorescent grin as he dances, his virtuosity can acquire a veneer of self congratulatory swagger. That's especially inappropriate if he's dancing a sensitive Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake or a penitent Count Albrecht in Giselle. But in any role, a whiter-than-white smile is going to draw attention away from the dancer's most important feature – his eyes.

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):