Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Tuesday, June 11


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:39 PM

Pix of whistleblower Edward Snowden's girlfriend, former ballet dancer and current acrobat Lindsay Mills.

Inside Edition, a US TV entertainment news programme, claimed to have tracked down Miss Mills. It said she was a former ballet dancer who had graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art, and now performed in The Waikiki Acrobatic Troupe in Honolulu.


Related.

In an exclusive interview with the Guardian newspaper, Snowden said he never told Mills exactly where he was going, only that he would be gone for a few weeks. He said “that was not an uncommon occurrence for someone who has spent the last decade working in the intelligence world” so his girlfriend didn’t ask questions.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:45 PM

Mick Jagger shares his fitness program.

He swears by ballet to help his balance, and also studies yoga and pilates.



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:48 PM

A review of Ballet Across America III by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Because each program of the “Ballet Across America III” season at the Kennedy Center here features three American companies, every performance is attended by partisan supporters keen to signal their delight in the offering by their team. On Sunday afternoon I caught Program C, the final segment of last week’s three-part event. Ovations were lusty for North Carolina Dance Theater, Ballet Austin and Dance Theater of Harlem.

Certainly the program was varied. I’m sorry I took little pleasure from it....



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:52 PM

Reaction to the decision of Michael Gove and Sarah Vine to withdraw their daughter from ballet school over body image issues.

It is not unheard of for private schools to ask pupils to leave if they feel they are not making the grade or for colleges in Oxbridge to turf out a student who will not make honours. But if any institution is willing to treat a child or young person, who is making the effort but not necessarily brilliant at her subject, in the same fashion then I say she is better off out of there. Could it not be that in reality, Ms Vine was in the wrong ballet class, and her daughter suffered the same fate?



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:54 PM

A reprint of Sarah Kaufman's behind-the-scenes piece on Washington Ballet's "Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises."

Choreography isn't all that is on Webre's mind. This ballet is a multimedia production. Lighting and projection designers sit facing the action, laptops open, conferring about set cues. (Video projections will include snippets of cabaret performer Josephine Baker; excerpts of Hemingway's prose, which will appear typewritten across the stage; and oh, yes, bulls. Lots of bulls.)



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:57 PM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada in 'Carmen' by Dana Glassman in The National Post.

The ads promise “Lust. Betrayal. Murder.” And while this ballet (which takes its inspiration from Prosper Mérimée’s torrid 1845 novella) does include all of those traits, it never fully ignites.

Italian choreographer Davide Bombana originally created this work as a one-act, which Toronto audiences got a taste of in 2009. In this new, full-length version, you mostly have to wait until Act II to really feel any heat. That said, there are still some memorable vignettes early on.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:07 PM

Danielle Rowe talks about her transition from classical dancing to joining a contemporary troupe.

''My body lends itself more to this kind of movement,'' says Rowe, who now splits her time between Amsterdam and the US, where her boyfriend, former fellow Australian Ballet dancer Luke Ingham, dances with the San Francisco Ballet. ''I feel more at home with it.''
For several years, Rowe had looked on ''in awe'' at Nederlands Dans Theater, a company founded in 1959 by a group of dancers from the Dutch National Ballet, whose experimental approach blended ballet and modern dance.



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 12 June 2013 - 10:23 AM

An appraisal of Peter Martins' tenure by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

The number of bad ballets he has commissioned has been high. Nevertheless, it’s for his City Ballet that Christopher Wheeldon and Alexei Ratmansky, the most in-demand ballet choreographers today, have made their finest work. This is unlikely to be an accident. We keep waiting for these men to surpass their best City Ballet creations elsewhere — Mr. Wheeldon is in residence at the Royal Ballet in London, Mr. Ratmansky at American Ballet Theater — but so far that hasn’t happened. Now the company has produced Mr. Peck too.



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 12 June 2013 - 10:32 AM

A review of New York City Ballet's season by Robert Gottlieb in The New York Observer.

A number of other things have gone right. Richard Tanner’s interesting Sonatas and Interludes, to fascinating music for prepared piano by John Cage, was danced by both Mearns and Peck (Tiler, not Justin; they’re not related). But the hero of the occasion was Amar Ramasar, who has finally graduated into the responsibilities of a committed male principal. This was a beautifully judged performance; he’s finally focused. The orchestra has been sounding worthy of the theater’s vastly improved acoustics—particularly strong was Tschaikovsky Suite No. 3 (a favorite of Balanchine’s) under the leadership of Daniel Capps. Teresa Reichlen and an up-and-coming boy from the corps, Zachary Catazaro, made the best argument I’ve seen in years for the schmaltzy “Elegie” movement of the Suite by utterly believing in it and going full throttle.



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 12 June 2013 - 11:07 AM

An appraisal of American Ballet Theatre's season by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

Elsewhere in the season, ABT's dancers often had stale showcases in undistinguished works, such as the company's stagings of the 19th century's "Don Quixote" and "Le Corsaire." In too many cases the leading dancers, notably Ms. Osipova and Mr. Vasiliev, strained to break out from their uneventful surroundings to make their mark. Ms. Osipova's efforts faired somewhat better, as she flew and spun in efforts to highlight lowlight ballets. Mr. Vasiliev, with his muscle-bound, stocky physique and unfortunate make-up and hair styling, is hardly well-suited to leading-man portrayals. For all his undeniable physical power, his wildly embellished dancing and fanciful, aerial legwork for the heroes of "Don Quixote" and "Le Corsaire" sometimes suggested a flying machine with loose propeller blades.



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 12 June 2013 - 11:10 AM

Reviews of American Ballet Theatre's "Romeo and Juliet."

The New York Times

In the balcony scene that sense of surprise extended to Juliet’s sensual awakening, with Ms. Vishneva seeming a little shocked by the abandon that her gorgeous line and pliant back can so fully express. In the bedroom scene she went further, appearing almost frightening in her passion, almost too much for the unflappable Mr. Gomes. And when she refused to marry Paris, the defiance in how she skittered away on point also seemed a self-discovery.


The New York Post

By the final act, the two had worked up a huge head of steam. MacMillan keeps Juliet motionless on her bed while the music rushes around her like a wild current — and Vishneva knew exactly how to navigate that into a theatrical coup. Gomes’ great moment was his desperate anguish at Juliet’s tomb, dancing with what he thought was her lifeless body.



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:43 PM

Dancers from the English National Ballet and Ballet San Jose perform with Bangkok City Ballet.

 

This is a rare chance to see La Sylphide, one of the world's oldest surviving romantic ballets, performed in full in Bangkok. The two-act show will be directed by Stephen Beagley, also from the English National Ballet.

 



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 14 June 2013 - 10:29 AM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in "The Bright Stream" by Matt O'Neill for Australian Stage.

 

Credit must also be given to the performer’s dramatic and comedic sensibilities. Having already mastered the particulars of the piece’s choreography, it’s doubly impressive to discover the performers have such a fantastic grasp of character and comedic timing. The piece wouldn’t work without a sense of timing to lend weight to the production’s silliness and the Bolshoi’s performers come through in spades.

 



#14 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:39 AM

A review of the Mariinsky Ballet's 3D broadcast of "Swan Lake" by Caroline Crampton in The New Statesman.

 

So can live 3D work for ballet? It’s certainly a tempting concept, since a reasonably-priced seat for a ballet at an opera house more often yields an exclusive view of the tops of the dancers’ heads than anything else. And as demonstrated here by the Mariinsky, it certainly seems like it might provide a workable alternative. Rather than well-muscled legs zooming out of the screen at my face as I had feared, the effect was subtle, enhancing the surreality and wildness of the forest where the Prince first catches a glimpse of his swan princess. The effect really comes into its own, however, in the big corps de ballet scenes, when Siegfried and Odette float among serried ranks of posed swans, their elegantly waving arms perfectly delineated through the magic spectacles.

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):